Personnel

This page lists all of the officers and men where records show they served at some point in 58th Bde RFA.  They are listed in alphabetical order by surname and then by forename.
IN DEVELOPMENT – I am adding some biographical information against each soldier listed here  For some, I have found a good deal, for others, sadly very little and that is usually due to a difficulty getting a positive identification of an individual.  Some soldiers are included simply because there is a reference somewhere to their name and finding which “Gunner Bale”, for example, is being referred to is not possible without further information.
UPDATE: 23 Jun 2019 – of the 673 men now listed here, some details of their service – and where it is available their civilian lives – are now given for 600 of them.  Just 73 more to go!
NEWS: 19 Mar 2019 – the Imperial War Museum’s project “Lives of the First World War” has now stopped taking any new contributions.  Those that have already been made are now being worked on by the museum and will be re-published as a permanent memorial in June.  
UPDATE 25 Apr 2018 – to commemorate ANZAC Day, I have added the details of two officers who served in 58th Bde: William Noel Pharazyn, a New Zealander, and Bruce Baynton Watchorn, an Australian.
Rank
Name
Forenames
Number
Battery
Biographical information
Bdr.
Adams
Frederick Arthur
10979
58 Bde AC
Born in 1888, Frederick Arthur Adams was an iron moulder from Great Heath, Coventry.  He married Gladys Maud Adams in the Free Methodist Chapel, Coventry, on 3 Oct 1908 and they had had three children by the time he enlisted, aged 26, in Nuneaton on 3 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 58 Bde AC on 13 Sep 1914.  He was promoted to Bdr the following day and appointed A/Cpl on 13 Nov 1914.  He was posted to D/58 on 21 Jan 1915 and was punished by Lt Col Drake by being reverted to Bdr on 26 Apr 1915 having been absent from parade.  He went Absent without Leave between 5 and 7 May 1915, so was further reduced to Dvr by a District Court Martial on 26 May 1915 by Lt Col Drake, but was re-appointed a Bdr same day (so the effect was that he lost his seniority as a Bdr).  He embarked at Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance with influenza on 8 Oct 1915 and was discharged back to duty on 13 Oct 1915.  After the evacuation from Gallipoli, he arrived at Alexandria on 27 Dec 1915.  He was admitted to 5th Canadian Hospital with heat stroke on 14 Jan 1916, and to 27th General Hospital, Cairo on 7 Mar 1916 with enteric fever.  As A/Sgt he was tested and passed as “superior” as a moulder on the Military Railways at Kantara (now El Qantara) near the Suez Canal.  He was posted to 3rd Division Ammunition Column in Palestine on 25 Dec 1918 and sent to Fovant Dispersal Centre for demobilisation in 1919.  He probably died in 1947.  
Dvr.
Adams
William
635242
A/58
From Dundee, William Adams enlisted on 23 Sep 1914.  He was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on 2 Oct 1917 and was discharged from the Army on 12 Feb 1919.
Bdr.
Addis
Samuel
66749
 
Samuel Addis enlisted on 22 Aug 1911.  He was discharged due to wounds on 29 May 1918 and awarded a Silver War Badge.  
Lt.
Aikenhead
David Francis
n/a
D/58
The son of Capt (later Lt Col) Frank and Mabel Louise Aikenhead, David Francis Aikenhead was born on 29 Jun 1895 in Liverpool and was educated at Cheltenham College. He followed his father into the Royal Artillery and was commissioned as a 2/Lt having been a gentleman cadet at the Royal Military Academy Woolwich, on 12 Aug 1914, at the same time as another future 58 Bde officer, William Noel Pharazyn. He married Margaret Clotilda Bayne in 1917 and they had a son and a daughter. He joined D/58 on 9 Oct 1917. Capt Aikenhead was wounded slightly in the knee by shrapnel but remained at duty on 8 Dec 1917 but was unable to accompany D/58 when it moved for a specific operation next day. He went to the Corps Rest Station on 12 Dec 1917. He went to England to attend a course at the School of Gunnery on 24 Dec 1917, returning on 25 Jan 1918. He went on 4 days’ leave on 12 Feb 1918, returning on 27 Feb 1918. He took part in – and won – an 11 Division Artillery horse jumping competition on “Charlie” on 2 June 1918. He became the OIC of D/58 the same day. Maj Aikenhead was recalled from leave in Paris 2 days early on 29 Aug 1918. He assumed command of B, C & D/58 plus D/59 (one subaltern and 4 ORs per gun) to cover the front of 32 Infantry Brigade on 25 Sep 1918. The following day he reconnoitred their route, which the after day “proved invaluable”. Went on 14 days’ leave to England on 15 Oct 1918. He was awarded the Military Cross on 12 Nov 1918 for gallantry in the field, the citation reading: “On September 27th, 1918, the brigade advanced across the Canal du Nord to a position near Marquion. During the advance the battery came under heavy shell and machine gun fire which threatened to delay the battery. Owing to the personal gallantry of this officer and the fine example which he set to his battery the guns were brought into action without delay and with the greatest credit to all concerned.” He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 3 March 1919, returning 19 March 1919. He left 58 Bde on 20 April 1919 when he went to England for service in either the RFA or RHA abroad. He served throughout WW2 as well and ended up as a Brigadier with the Distinguished Service Order before retiring in 1947. He died in his home village of Great Elm, Somerset on 19 May 1955 aged 59 and is commemorated on tablets in the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Great Elm. His brother Robert had served as a private in a Canadian infantry regiment and had been killed at 2nd Ypres on 24 April 1915.
Sgt.
Aindow
George Townley
25163
C/58
Born in 1892 in Litherland, Liverpool, George Townley Aindow enlisted on 5 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No. 2 Depot at Preston.  On 12 Sep 1914 he was posted to 60 Bde Ammunition Column, and then posted as a driver to D/60 on 22 Jan 1915.  He became a gunner on 28 June 1915.  He was posted to XI Division Howitzer Bde on its formation on 26 April 1916 in Egypt and was appointed A/Bdr next day.  This became 133 Bde.  When that brigade was split up, he was posted as an A/Bdr from 133 Bde to 58 Bde on 4 Dec 1916.  He was promoted to Bdr on 12 Feb 1917.  After the death of his friend, Ernest Inch on 29 Sep 1917, he wrote a touching letter to the dead man’s fiancée, Miss R Colliss to express his “deepest sympathy”.  He had served alongside Ernest throughout their military service from training to Gallipoli, Egypt and France.  He was appointed A/Cpl on 19 March 1918 in C/58.  He was promoted to Cpl on 22 March 1918, and then to Sgt on 7 Aug 1918 (all still in C/58).  He was mentioned in dispatches according to the London Gazette of 16 March 1919.  After the war ended, he was sent to the dispersal centre at Prees Heath on 22 March 1919.  His address on demobilisation was 49 Tattersall Road, Liverpool.  He had married Margaret Wareham at St Philips, Litherland in 1917.  She passed away aged 53 in 1945.   He died aged 66 in 1959.  His brother Frank Norman Aindow was a sapper in the Royal Engineers (89th Field Company) and was killed on 29 June 1915.  
Gnr.
Alford    
Charles 
10574
C/58
Charles Alford first went overseas with his unit to Egypt, arriving on 14 July 1915.  He was serving in C/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal, which was gazetted on 20 Aug 1919.
Bdr.
Allen
   
A/58?
Bdr Allen was one of the witnesses to the absence of Gnr Jonathan Kerr (81) from camp while the brigade was at Milford on 7 Jun 1915.
Capt.
Allen    
Robert Hall
n/a
D/58
Born in Calcutta, India on 11 Jun 1886 Robert Hall Allen was a professional soldier. In 1911 he was a Lt in India with No.4 Ammunition Column. On 25 Sep 1914, Lt Allen was appointed as Officer of Company of Gentlemen Cadets, Class B, to be advanced to class A, at the Royal Military Academy. He was promoted to Captain on 30 Oct 1914 and was to remain seconded at the academy. He was replaced at the academy on 19 March 1915 and it is likely that this was when he joined 58 Bde. He embarked SS “Karroo” in Devonport on 5 July 1915 as a Captain in 58 Bde. He was in action with the brigade in Gallipoli, being mentioned in the War Diaries for the unit on 20 Aug and 18 Sep 1915. He must have left the brigade in late 1915 or early 1916 because he was replaced as a staff captain on 2 March 1916. He was promoted to Major “and to remain seconded” on 29 Dec 1916. He was awarded the Military Cross on 1 Jan 1917. He was appointed as Deputy Assistant Adjutant General (DAAG) having previously been a Brigade Major on 2 May 1917 and was replaced as DAAG on 12 March 1918. He stayed on after the war and became a student at the Staff College on 22 Jan 1920. It is likely that he was the same R H Allen who became a Major General in command of 5th Anti-Aircraft Division during 1940 protecting much of southern England and Wales during the Battle of Britain.  
Gnr.
Ambler
Alfred
18851
A/58
Born in Cleckheaton, Alfred Ambler enlisted in Leeds.  He died of wounds on 12 Oct 1917 and was buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, near Poperinge, Belgium.  
2/Lt.
Anderson
Richard Galbraith
n/a
D/58
2/Lt G R Anderson joined the brigade on 19 Jan 1917 and was posted to D/58.   On 2 June 1917 he was serving in C/58 when he was awarded 4 days leave to Paris.  
Bdr.
Andrew
David
6993
D/58
Born in Airdrie, David Andrew enlisted in Hamilton, Lanarkshire.  He was known to his family as Davie.  He was killed in action on 26 Sep 1916 during the first day of the Battle of Thiepval Ridge.  His commanding officer, 2/Lt Richard Blaker, wrote to Bdr Andrew’s family the following day to express his sympathy, and in reply William Andrew, the dead man’s brother, wrote back on 3 Oct 1916: “No words of mine can convey to you, the deep gratitude which we feel towards you for your kindness, at this time.  There was none of us at home, but thought he would survive the war.”  He is buried in Pozières British Cemetery, Ovillers-La-Boisselle, France.
Capt.
Angus
Reginald George
n/a
HQ
Reginald George Angus was born in Gateshead on 21 Jul 1880, the son of leather merchant William Mathwin Angus and his wife, Julia Anne Angus (née Dutton). In 1891 he was a boarder at Sea Bank House school in Alnmouth, Northumberland. His younger brother William Gordon Angus was killed in action in the Boer war on 3 Jun 1901. Reginald served in the Royal Garrison Artillery and in 1902 was a Lieutenant. After the war broke out he was made a temporary Captain in the Royal Field Artillery on 12 Oct 1914. By January 1915 he was serving in 58 Bde’s Ammunition Column and while training at Chapeltown Barracks, Leeds, he married his cousin Norah Bindley Dutton on 16 May 1915 at West Didsbury Parish Church. He was aged 35, Norah, who was 24, was from Newcastle-on-Tyne. They moved to 24 Rufford Drive, Yeadon, Yorks, where they lived with Norah’s mother. Captain Angus sailed on SS “Knight Templar” from Devonport on 1 July 1915. He was the brigade’s Adjutant and so wrote the unit’s war diaries when it was posted overseas and while it was in Gallipoli. The barge he was on as they landed at Suvla Bay on 9 Aug 1915 got caught on the boom. On 20 Aug 1915 a Turkish sniper tried to kill him, but instead he was only hit with a shower of dirt as the bullet kicked up dust near him. He relinquished his commission on 18 Aug 1917 due to ill health contracted on active service and was granted the honorary rank of Captain. After the war he was living at 8 Norfolk Gardens, Chapel Allerton, Leeds. Reginald and Norah had a son, George Dutton Angus, who died in 1937, aged 20 whist serving as a pilot officer in the RAF. In 1939 he and Norah were living in Yeadon, Leeds, and he was working as an engineer’s clerk. He died on 8 March 1963 in Yeadon, Yorks, a retired physiotherapist, Norah died on 25 April 1969.
Dvr.
Archman    
Samuel
93460
B/58
Samuel Archman was granted 10 days leave to England on 26 Oct 1916 and was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on 2 Oct 1917.  
Gnr.
Armitage 
Alec
152294
A/58
From Leeds, Alec Armitage was killed in action on 25 Aug 1917, alongside his six comrades – Gnr John Barber (91942), Gnr Howard Denley (74517), Dvr Frederick Thomas Leathard (109178), A/Bdr William Monks (67578), Gnr Arthur Noble (L/5762) and Gnr Herbert Taylor (141267) – were killed.  He is buried alongside them in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium.  His mother, Mary, was his sole legatee.
A/Bdr.
Armitage 
Willie
120363
A/58
Willie Armitage died of his wounds on 12 Jan 1917 and is buried in Varennes Military Cemetery, France.  He was the son of Herbert and Emily Armitage of Marsden, near Huddersfield.  He is commemorated on Holme Valley War Memorial. 
Gnr.
Ashman
Charles
11172
A/58
Born in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, Charles Ashman was the son of Mrs Julia Ashman of Ickworth Park, Horringer, Bury St. Edmonds.  He enlisted in Oxford as one of the original members of the unit.  He was the mess butler for A/58 and was killed instantly by a shell on 27 July 1917.  He was described by his battery commander, Maj Hutton, as having “a courage far above the average” and his death was “very much regretted by all”.   He is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium.
Gnr.
Askew
Harry Owen
11281
A/58
Harry Owen Askew was a labourer from North End, Leamington, Warks.  He enlisted in Warwick on 3 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  He was posted to 184 Bty, 58th Bde on 10 Sep 1914.  This was renumbered as A/58 in Jan 1915.  His battery commander, Major Crozier, sought a separation allowance for him on the basis that he had become engaged on Aug Bank Holiday 1914 to a Minnie Stokes from Worcester and had intended to marry her on 1 Oct 1914, but before that had been able to happen he had joined the Army.  He had got leave of absence to marry her on 13 Dec 1914 because she was expecting.  The War Office though did not regard this as sufficient proof to merit her being granted a separation allowance.  On 10 June 1915, Cpl Moore and Bdr Allen reported that he had overstayed the leave he had been given before being posted overseas so was fined 3 days’ pay by the Brigade’s Commanding Officer, Lt Col Drake, on 17 June 1915.  He was the mess cook for A/58 officer’s mess and on 18 Jul 1917 was wounded in the right arm and abdomen during a period of heavy shelling.  He was evacuated to the UK and was in the East Suffolk and Ipswich Hospital in Aug 1917.   He was posted to another unit on 3 Jan 1918 and was in 435 Battery when he was transferred to Class Z on 1 Oct 1919, before being formally demobbed on 31 March 1920.    
Sgt.
Aspinall
John S
L/18212
B/58
John S Aspinall was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 11 March 1920.  The citation read: “On 11 October 1918, he was in charge of a convoy of six ammunition wagons.  The column came under heavy fire and suffered several casualties.  He got all the teams safely under cover, and finally delivered the ammunition at the battery.  He has on many occasions shown great coolness under fire, particularly at Guissigny, on 8 November 1918.”  His 4 medals (DCM, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal) were sold at auction in 2007 for £916.
Lt.
Atchley
Reginald St George
n/a
HQ
Reginald St George Atchley was born on 16 July 1893 in Brighton, Sussex.  He was living with his mother in both 1901 and 1911 Census.  He was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt in the infantry on 19 Nov 1914 and promoted to temporary Lt in 11th Battalion Alexandra, Princess of Wales’s Own’ (Yorkshire Regiment) on 29 Dec 1914 when he transferred from a Reserve to a Regular battalion as a temporary officer with seniority from that date.  He transferred to the York and Lancaster Regiment on 12 Sep 1915 and served with them overseas.  At some point he transferred to the RFA and joined 58th Bde on 15 Dec 1916.  He was assigned to the Brigade HQ.  On 21 Jan 1917, he assumed the duties of the Orderly Officer in the HQ of 58th Bde, but on 3 Feb 1917 he was evacuated sick and transferred back to England the following day, so was stuck off the strength of the brigade.   He recovered and was promoted to Lt in the RFA on 4 April 1918 (though this was subsequently antedated to 1 July 1917).  He was appointed an Acting Captain on 29 Aug 1918 while acting as an adjutant.  He was awarded the Military Cross in the King’s Birthday Honours for 1919 (gazetted on 3 June 1919) while serving in the HQ of 45th Bde, RFA, and ceased to act as adjutant on 13 June 1919 so reverted to Lt.  He resigned his commission on 20 April 1920 and was granted the rank of Captain and admitted to the General Reserve of Officers. After the war he became a stockbroker and sailed on 9 July 1921 to New York from Southampton on the Cunard liner, Mauretania.  He returned to Southampton on 2 Aug 1921 on the Aquitania.  In spring 1923 he was living at Leckhampstead, Reigate Road, Reigate, Surrey.  He sailed again to New York in 1936 on the Bremen, returning on the Queen Mary.  From the mid-1950s, once Reginald had reached 60, he was living with his wife Kathleen Helena (born 5 Oct 1900) in Hurstpierpoint, Sussex.  They took regular cruises to Madeira.  He died in Devon in 1974.
2/Lt.
Atwill    
Herbert Frederick
n/a
A/58
Born on 7 Dec 1890 in Kent, Herbert Frederick Atwill was brought up in Beckenham.  He joined the 2nd County of London (Westminster Dragoons) Yeomanry as a trooper on 29 Apr 1910 but left on 14 Oct 1911 to go to live in Australia.  After war was declared he returned to the UK and presented himself to a Capt Leverson at the War Office seeking a commission.  He was appointed as a 2/Lt on probation in the RFA on 8 June 1915 and confirmed in rank a few months later.  He went overseas on 11 Oct 1915 and sailed for Mudros where he was posted to join 10 (Irish) Division’s artillery on 25 Oct 1915.  On 7 Nov 1915 he then sailed from Mudros to Alexandria, arriving on 11 Nov 1915 and was posted to join 58 Bde at Zahrieh Camp on 20th.  He sailed to France with the brigade and was posted to join the new X/11 Trench Mortar Battery on 23 Jul 1916.  A week later, on 31 Jul 1916, he was involved in an accident: he was being instructed at VI Corps Toby Mortar School when a practice round (“drill shell”) was fired from the Toby mortar.  The friction tube (Tube friction L.S. short) used to detonate the mortar flew back and struck him just below the right eye, embedding itself in his cheek.  He went to the Casualty Clearing Station and had the wound dressed before returning to duty and the Court of Enquiry concluded that this was an unforeseeable accident.  He re-joined 58 Bde on transfer from 11 Division’s Trench Mortar battery on 22 Dec 1916 and was assigned to A/58.  He was sent on a signalling course at the 11 Division Signalling School at Yvrench on 25 Jan 1917.  He went sick on 23 Feb 1917 and was admitted to 22 Casualty Clearing Station, rejoining the unit on 1 March 1917.  In late April 1917 A/58’s mess received a direct hit and he was badly shaken, though unwounded; all of his kit was blown to pieces.  He was granted a few days’ leave in Paris along with 2/Lt Lewis in mid May 1917.  He had 10 days’ leave to the UK between 21 Jun and 4 Jul 1917, but again had a near miss on 13 Jul 1917 when he was “strafed out of his dugout”.  He was appointed an A/Capt between 1 Oct and 29 Nov 1917, some of which period (21 Oct to 3 Nov 1917) he spent on leave back in the UK.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 17 Dec 1917, the citation saying: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  Twice during an attack when one of his guns was hit and an ammunition dump set on fire it was due to his prompt action that serious loss of life was averted and the rate of barrage fire maintained.  Later, when another gun pit was hit he succeeded in putting out the fire and saving a number of wounded men from being burnt to death.”  He went on leave on 4 Feb 1918, returning on 20 Feb 1918.  He left the brigade on 3 March 1918 when he was sent to the UK with a recommendation of a tour in UK, so was struck off the strength of the brigade.  He was sent home for a tour of duty and rest on 8 Aug 1918, was demobilised on 11 Nov 1919 as part of “C Group” from the Officers’ Wing of the Repatriation Camp at Pirbright and relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920. He probably returned to Australia after the war to continue his work as a sheep and cattle farmer.  He died in Tonbridge, Kent in 1951.
S/Smith
Aubrey
Caradoc
82429
 
While serving at Gallipoli, Caradoc Aubrey was evacuated on the HMHS “Assaye”.  He had been born in Treherbert in the Rhondda valley in South Wales, the son of a blacksmith.  After the war, he married Lydia Owen in 1920.  He died on 21 Feb 1952, his address at the time being the Tunnel Hotel, Blaengwnfi, Glam.  He left £1434 1s 2d to his widow, Lydia, and to Gordon Ivor Aubrey, a ropesmith.
 
Austin 
H
 
D/58?
H Austin was a close friend of Bdr Davie Andrew (6993) and after Andrew’s death, his brother asked 2/Lt R S Blaker to pass on a note to Austin.
Gnr.
Ayres
R F
   
Gnr R F Ayres (possibly Richard F Ayres, service number 55073) was found guilty of sleeping at his post and of conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline while at Zahrieh Camp, Egypt, so was awarded 14 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by a Court Martial held on 29 Aug 1915. 
Dvr.
Bache   
Bert 
101430
D/58
Born in Quarry Bank, Staffs, in 1896, the son of William and Elizabeth Bache, Bert Bache worked as a farm hand when he was 14 and then as a collier.  The family home was 113 Two Gates, Cradley Heath, near Halesowen and Bert enlisted aged 19 on 25 Oct 1915 in Brierley Hill.  He was posted initially to No. 5 Depot in Athlone, Ireland on 4 Nov 1915.  He was posted to 5A Reserve Brigade on 5 Nov 1915.  While at Athlone, he disobeyed an order on 14 Feb 1916 and was sentenced to 3 days being confined to barracks.  He was posted to 4A Reserve Brigade on 1 March 1916 and then to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force in Egypt on 14 March 1916.   He embarked at Devonport on 15 March 16 and disembarked in Alexandria on 26 March 1916.  Once there, he was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 10 April 1916 and to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 20 July 1916.  He was then posted to D/58 on 25 April 1917.   He remained in 58 Bde until he sailed from Dieppe on 30 Jan 1919 to go to No.3 Dispersal Unit at Clipstone on 31 Jan 1919 in preparation for being demobbed.   He was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 28 Jan 1918 and returned to the UK to live in Cradley Heath.
Sgt.
Bacon
C W
 
A/58
Sgt Bacon witnessed Dvr Robert Sutherland (92248) being absent from camp near Acheux, France, on 24 Feb 1917. Two weeks later, on 7 Mar 1917, he was wounded near Miraumont. He was admitted to No.1 General Hospital in Etretat and was described as dangerously ill on 17 Mar 1917 and “may be visited”. 
Ftr.
Bailey 
John E
51793
D/58
John E Bailey went to France with 118 Bde in March 1915 and fought at the 2nd battle of Ypres.  He then transferred with his battery into 58 Bde when it became the new D/58 in July 1916.  He served with them at Agny and Courcelette, and ended the war as a Staff Sergeant.  In 1932 he was unemployed, single and living with a sister in Crewe when he wrote to former 2/Lt RS Blaker about his book, “Medal without Bar” saying that he was the Fitter (“Tiffy”) mentioned in it and asking for help in finding employment.
Maj.
Baines
John Hardcastle
n/a
OIC C/58
John Hardcastle Baines was born in 1884 in London.  His father was a solicitor.  He studied at University College, Oxford, and was a member of the Inner Temple.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in 1911 in the Territorial Force.  He was mobilised on 4 Aug 1914 but didn’t go overseas until 3 Nov 1916 when he went to France.  He was the brother-in-law of fellow 58th Bde officer, Capt Harold Francis Cartmel-Robinson, having married his younger sister, Gladys Ada Cartmel-Robinson, in 1912.  They lived in Lewes in Sussex and had a daughter in 1914 called Loris M. Baines.  It is not clear when he joined 58th Bde, since the first reference to him is that he returned from sick leave in England on 4 Oct 1917 and reported back for duty with 58th Bde when he was “given back command of his old battery (C/58)”.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 1 Jan 1918.  He was sent on the Overseas Artillery Course in England on 17 Jan 1918, returning to the unit on 4 March 1918.   The following month, along with several other members of the brigade, he was gassed on 9 April 1918 and so had to retire to the wagon lines.  He was sent to 1 Corps Officers Rest Station on 4 May 1918.   When the CO, Lt Col Bedwell, was away standing in for the 11 Division’s Commander Royal Artillery (CRA), Major Baines acted as Brigade Commander for 10 days from 9 July 1918, and again when Bedwell went on 7 days’ leave on 11 Aug 1918.  Major Baines then went on leave to Paris on 5 Sep 18, returning after 3 days’ travelling on 15 Sep 1918.  He again assumed command of the brigade on 24 Oct 1918 when Bedwell went to be CRA for 14 days.  On 3 Nov 1918, he was given command of the division’s “Right Group” which comprised 29th Bde, 58th Bde and 175th Army Bde RFA, though went on leave to England 5 days later so was away when the Armistice was declared.  When he returned on 28 Nov 1918, he again assumed command of the brigade though on 1 Dec 1918 he went to 11 Division HQ to act as the Divisional Education Officer.  He returned to the brigade in Jan 1919 and then proceeded on leave to England for demobilisation.  He relinquished his rank of Major and reverted to being a Captain on 3 Jan 1919 on ceasing to command a battery.  He appears to have stayed in the Territorial Force because he was promoted to Major in 1920 when serving in 1st Home Counties Bde and promoted from Lt Col to Colonel in 1928 with 57 (Home Counties) Field Bde RA.   He retired as a Colonel on 11 Dec 1945 and died in Sussex in 1967 aged 84.
Lt.
Baines 
H or N
n/a
C/58
Lt Baines joined 11 Division Ammunition Column on 11 Nov 1916, and then posted to 58 Bde a few days later, on 19 Nov 1916.  He was sent on a gas course on 11 Feb 1917.  He reported Cpl John Gunson (20605) for neglect of duty on 23 Mar 1917.  
2/Lt.
Baird
William James Stirling
n/a
185 bty
William James Stirling Baird was born on 18 May 1891 in Midlothian, Scotland, and attended George Heriot’s School in Edinburgh, leaving in 1910, and then studied science at the University of Edinburgh.   He was commissioned on 15 Oct 1914 as a Temporary 2/Lt having been a cadet at the Officers Training Corps.   He joined 185 Battery of 58 Bde soon after and helped with the paperwork of men joining that battery such as Cpl W S S Lewis (11163) on 10 Sep 1914.   By Nov 1915, he was in 58 Bde AC, and signed the service record for Dvr F Chaplin (11143) on 3 Nov 1915.  He was promoted to Lt on 20 May 1916 and made an Acting Captain while 2iC of a battery on 26 Oct 1916.  He was made an Acting Major between 17 and 29 Jan 1918.  He was awarded the Military Cross, which was gazetted on 26 July 1918, the citation reading: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in charge of the battery wagon line, when hostile infantry suddenly opened with machine guns and rifles at short-range.  He displayed great ability and resource in getting all away to a place of safety, and subsequently in maintaining touch with his gun line under difficult circumstances.”    He ceased to be a Captain on ceasing to be 2iC of a battery on 27 Jan 1919.  After the war his address was Forglen, Corstorphine, Midlothian, Scotland.  He was confirmed in his rank of Major on 25 Feb 1925 while serving with 57th (Lowland) Medium Bde.  On 11 June 1941, having attained the age limit, Major Baird relinquished his commission, retaining his rank of Major.
2/Lt.
Balderston
Chester Thomas
n/a
C/58
Chester Thomas Balderston was born on 24 Oct 1893 in Mount Albion, Prince Edward Island, Canada.  His father was Murdock Balderston, of Southport PEI was a farmer, and his mother was Maggie J McRae who pre-deceased him.  Chester was educated at McDonald Consolidated, Mount Herbert, Prince Edward Island, and Prince of Wales College.  He entered the service of the Canadian Bank of Commerce on 28 Dec 1911.  He enlisted in Aug 1914 into 1st Battery Canadian Field Artillery (RCA) as a gunner, with service number 40140, and drafted his will on 10 March 1915.  Having been a Bombardier in the 1st Battery, 1 Bde, RCA, he was commissioned into the Royal Field Artillery as a 2/Lt having been in an Officer Cadet Unit.  On 18 Aug 1916 he was posted from the Divisional Ammunition Column to A/133 Bde.  When A/133 was split up and distributed across 58 Bde on 29 Nov 1916, Chester was assigned to C/58.   He returned from leave on 22 Jan 1917 and was sent on a gas course at Yvrench on 31 Jan 1917.   He was wounded on 25 June 1917 when he was walking along a trench and some infantrymen were playing with an enemy grenade when it went off badly smashing his leg.  He died the following day of his wounds in No. 53 Casualty Clearing Station.  He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension.
2/Lt.
Baldwin
C L
n/a
A/58
C L Baldwin joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from 58th Bde on 2 May 1917 and then rejoined 58th Bde – joining A/58 – on 6 June 1917.  He was in Bailleul with Capt Rowbotham of D/58 on 2 Jul 1917 when a bomb was dropped injuring them both.  He lost his left arm from the shoulder but was described as being “plucky” and the following day in hospital was “wonderfully cheery”.
Dvr.
Baldwin 
Fred
73250
A/58
Fred Baldwin had been absent without leave from the brigade since 23 May 1917 and was fetched from the Assistant Provost Marshal over a year later on 17 July 1918 and brought back to the brigade under escort.
Gnr.
Bale
   
C/58
Gunner Bale passed as a 2nd class signaller by XIII Corps school on 22 March 1917.  
 
Ballantyne
   
D/58?
When Gnr Edward Tilbury (1128) wrote on 21 Sep 1917 to 2/Lt R S Blaker who was recuperating in the UK from sickness, he passed on good wishes from another soldier called Ballantyne.  
Dvr.
Ballard
Ernest
10994
B/58
A 22-year old pattern cutter from Bristol, Ernest Ballard had been born in the city in St Werbergh’s parish and was baptised as William Ernest Ballard on 10 Aug 1892 at St Simon’s in the city.  He was living at 32 Marlborough St with his parents, William and Jane Ballard, when he enlisted in Bristol Recruiting Office No.2 on 2 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to RFA’s No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there was posted to 185 Battery, 58 Bde, on 10 Sep 1914.  This became B/58 in early 1915.  During his training at Chapeltown Barracks in Leeds and at Milford Camp in Surrey, he managed to be absent from the camp or from his duties on at least 7 occasions.  He was first reported absent from barracks at 10pm on 1 Dec 1914 by Bdr Southey and Bdr Daw, so was awarded 3 days confinement to barracks by Capt C W Hince.  He was again absent from roll call on 30 Dec 1914 until 9.30pm on 1 Jan 1915, according to Bdr Theakston and Bdr Daw, so was awarded 7 days confinement to barracks by 2/Lt Cecil H Borthwick.  On 13 Jan 1915 he was reported as being absent from stables and was subsequently found in bed at 7.15am.  He was awarded 3 days confinement to barracks by Maj Rupert J C Meyricke and those who had witnessed his offence were Sgt Cornford, Cpl White, Bdr Blackburn.  He was absent again from roll call on 18 Jan 1915 until roll call the following day according to Bdr Blackburn and Bdr Hargist so was awarded a further 5 days confinement to barracks by Maj Meyricke.  He was absent from 10pm 1 Feb 1915 to 7.15am the next day, so was awarded 5 days confinement to barracks by Maj Meyricke, witnesses Cpl White and Bdr Daw.  He was again absent from 10pm 2 March 15 until roll call at 8pm the next day so was awarded 10 days confinement to barracks and was deprived 10 days’ pay by the OC 58 Bde, witnesses Bdr Lewis, Bdr Crocombe and Cpl Burgoyne.  While at Milford Camp, he went absent without leave from 5.30am on 3 May 1915 until he was apprehended by the police in Bristol on 13 May 15, so was awarded 21 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by the brigade’s commanding officer, Lt Col Drake and he was fined 11 days’ pay.  His field punishment was conducted between 15 May and 4 June 1915.  On 3 Nov 1915, Ernest’s mother wrote to the War Office to enquire whether he might be awarded extra pay now her husband had died.  It is not known how the War Office responded.  Ernest was lightly wounded in April 1918 by a gas shell so was admitted to 7 General Hospital at St Omer, France, on 18 April 1918, and from there to 3rd Western General Hospital.  He went absent without leave from Catterick on 9 July 1918.  It was initially thought he may have deserted, and a Court of Inquiry was held on 2 Aug 1918 which identified all of the Army equipment he had failed to return.  This comprised all of his uniform and kit, with a total value of just under £8.  But he was found and tried before a District Court Martial which sentenced him to 84 days detention.  While he was in detention, he was posted to 4 Reserve Brigade and he returned to duty a few days after the Armistice, on 16 Nov 1918.  He was posted back to France on 20 Nov 1918 and assigned to 464/179 Army Brigade.  He was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Chisledon on 31 Jan 1919 in preparation for demobilisation.  
2/Lt.
Balston
Montagu
n/a
A/58
Montagu Balston was born in Harrington, Middlesex, on 18 Jan 1889.  He was educated at Eton College and served for two years between 1904 and 1906 in the Eton College Volunteers.  He had moved to Australia where he was an “independent gentleman” who worked as a grazier, but part way through the war he returned to the UK and was given a letter of introduction to the War Office from the Australian High Commission.  He enlisted at St John’s Wood, London on 13 Mar 1916 attended the Royal Artillery Cadet School, Topsham Barracks, Exeter.  He was commissioned there on 28 Jul 1916, as a 2/Lt in the Special Reserve aged 27.  He was posted to A/58 from 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 29 Sep 1916.  He was sent on a course at V Army School on 24 Nov 1916 and then posted back to 11 DAC on 2 Dec 1916.  Three days later he was posted to join the artillery units of 3rd Division, joining 3 Division Ammunition Column on 24 Dec 1916.   He had leave to the UK between 20 and 30 Jan 1917 and was posted to 40 Bde RFA on 30 Mar 1917.  He had a further spell of leave to the UK between 7 and 16 Aug 1917, before going on a month’s course to learn to become an observer with the Royal Flying Corps on 23 Oct 1917, being assigned as an observer on probation three days later.  He was demobilised from the RAF on 4 Jul 1919 in Blandford and returned to Australia where he got engaged on 2 Feb 1920 to Doris May Estil Duffield.  By 1930 he was Chairman of Directors of Katanning Grammar School, Western Australia.  
Gnr.
Banks
Cecil Louis
54726
 
Cecil Louis Banks enlisted on 14 Dec 1914 and was appointed a Driver.  He was discharged due to sickness on 12 June 1919 and was awarded a Silver Badge.  
Gnr.
Banks
John Henry
55900
C/58
A colliery repairer from Blaina, Monmouthshire, John Henry Banks served in the Royal Garrison Artillery from 1893 to 1902 with service number 96730 and was then in the Reserves until 1905.   He married Lilly Hatherall on 15 Feb 1908 in Blainavon Church, Monmouthshire, and they had 2 children but his younger child, a daughter, Doreen, died of measles in Feb 1915, aged 2.  He enlisted on 25 Nov 1914 in Newport, Monmouthshire, aged 35.  He was posted initially to the depot at Preston and then on 16 June 1915 was posted to C/58.  He had been evacuated back to Alexandria (from either Mudros or Gallipoli), but by 24 Oct 1915 was again fit for duty.  He was reported as being drunk just once during the war, on 1 April 1916.  He was posted to 87th Company of the Labour Corps as a Private with service number 396271 on 14 Oct 1917.  He was absent from tattoo at 9pm on 6 Oct 1918 so was fined 3 days’ pay and confined to barracks for 3 days.  After he was discharged, he was awarded a pension of 5s 6d a week from Feb 1919 for at least a year due to rheumatism which made him 20% disabled.  
Gnr.
Barber
John
91942
A/58
John Barber was the son of Joe Allatt Barber and Margaret Alice Barber of 13 Heywood, Great Harwood, Blackburn, Lancs.  He served first as a Private in the Royal Army Medical Corps with service number 10543, before at some point transferring to the RFA and into 58 Bde.  He was killed in action on 25 Aug 1917 in the Ypres salient alongside his comrades Alec Armitage, Howard Denley, Frederick Thomas Leathard, William Monks, Arthur Noble and Herbert Taylor.  He is buried alongside them in the New Irish Farm Cemetery. 
Bdr.
Barber
W I
W/1347
D/58
Bdr W I Barber was from Stockport.  He was serving in D/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal on 7 Oct 1917.  He finished the war as a Cpl.  
Gnr.
Barker
   
D/58
Gunner Barker passed as a 2nd class signaller by XIII Corps School on 22 March 1917. 
Gnr.
Barnard
Samuel
L/37807
 
Samuel Barnard was the son of George and Marie Barnard of 5 Harrey’s Cottages, Upminster Road, Rainham, Essex.   He died of his wounds in the 32nd Casualty Clearing Station and is buried in Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty, near Arras, France.
Dvr.
Barnard
William Henry
10589
C/58
William Henry Barnard was a 24-year old labourer from Middlezoy, Bridgwater, Somerset, living with his mother Emily, brother Henry and sister Mary when he enlisted on 3 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.   From there he was posted to 186 Battery, 58th Bde, on 10 Sep 1914, which became C/58 in early 1915.  He went overseas with 58th Bde and served at Gallipoli but appears to have been evacuated on about 13 Dec 1915 and was transferred out of the unit as a result.   He was at the Dispersal Centre at Fovant on 11 Feb 1919, serving in 63 Reserve Battery at the time, ready for demobilisation.  
Bdr.
Baron
Thomas Ernest
148993
B/58
Thomas Ernest Baron, known as Ernest (or more usually Ernie) was born on 24 Jan 1890 in Nafferton, Yorks, the son of Thomas and Violetta Baron (née Hope). The family moved to Bridlington where Ernie worked as a gardener and then as a commercial traveller in the fruit trade. He married May Smith on 4 June 1911 in Bridlington, and they had a son, Robert Sefton Baron, born 29 June 1912. He enlisted on 9 Dec 1915 in Bridlington aged 27, but was not mobilised until 15 May 1916 in Beverley, Yorks, and was posted initially to No.1 Depot, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He went overseas on 11 Oct 1916 to France and was posted to A/133 Bde RFA on 21 Oct 1916. Two months later, on 26 Dec 1916, when A/133 was broken up he was posted to B/58. On 27 Jan 1917 he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance with rheumatism, rejoining his unit on 10 Feb 1917. He was awarded 14 days’ leave to the UK on 9 Nov 1917. On 18 Jan 1918, he was awarded 7 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by his battery commander, Capt A L Cameron, for “making an improper reply to an NCO”. The witnesses for this charge were Sgt Fry and Cpl Cole. He was appointed a paid L/Bdr on 4 Apr 1918, replacing L/Bdr Farley (2996) who reverted to the ranks. On 28 Jun 1918 he was appointed a paid A/Bdr, replacing A/Bdr Hawkes (22826) who was appointed A/Cpl. On 7 Jul 1918 he was promoted to Bdr to replace Bdr Chapman (48154) who was promoted to Cpl. He was severely reprimanded by his commanding officer, Maj H R Lodge, on 3 Dec 1918 for irregular conduct in making a complaint contrary to procedure in Army Act Section 43, an offence witnessed by Sgt McCannah and BSM Varney. On 21 Jan 1919 he was appointed a paid A/Cpl. He returned to the UK for demobilisation on 19 May 1919 and attended No.1 Dispersal Unit, North Camp, Ripon on 24 May 1919. He returned to Bridlington and to the fruit trade working as a greengrocer and market gardener and he and may had three more children. Ernie died in Bridlington in 1969, aged 79.
Gnr.
Barr
Ernest Marshall
77797
D/58
According to the Absent Voter List for Greenwich, Ernest Marshall Barr was serving with D/58 in October 1918.
Gnr.
Barr 
James
92497
A/58
James Barr was born in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, and enlisted there.  He was killed in action on 1 Nov 1916 and is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery.
Dvr.
Barraclough
Lawrence
72992
A/58
Lawrence Barraclough was born in 1890, the son of Uriah Barraclough of Beeston, Yorks.  Before enlisting he worked as an apprentice draughtsman at the locomotive manufacturer Kitsons of Leeds’ Airedale Foundry.  He enlisted on 11 Jan 1915 and was posted initially to No.1 Depot at Newcastle-upon-Tyne.  From there he was posted to 2B Reserve Bde on 28 Apr 1915 and then to 4A Reserve Bde on 5 Jun 1915.  Shortly afterwards, he was posted to A/58 on 16 Jun 1915 just a couple of weeks before 58 Bde went overseas.  He sailed with the brigade on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He served at Suvla Bay between 6 Aug and 24 Sep 1915.  He was evacuated back to Alexandria, arriving there on 1 Oct 1915 and staying until 4 Dec 1915.  He was deployed to the Egyptian frontier between 15 Jan and 25 Mar 1916 before going to Salonika, sailing on 2 May 1916 and arriving on 6 May 1916 to join 54 Bde RFA where he joined 29 Infantry Bde’s Small Arms Ammunition (29 SAA) Column on 20 Jul 1916.  He was sent to Base on 20 May 1917, then back to 29 SAA on 3 Aug 1917, back to Base on 28 Oct 1917, then to 98 Battery, 1 Bde RFA on 1 Nov 1917.  He was granted furlough between 17 Sep and 7 Nov 1918.  He finally left Salonika on 10 Jan 1919 because he was posted to join the British Military Mission to South Russia.  He served in Russia between 16 Jan and 16 Feb 1919, at which point he was taken ill with typhus fever.  He was treated at 40 British Field Ambulance in Baku, 27 Casualty Clearing Station in Batum and 43 British General Hospital back in Salonika.  he was evacuated back to the UK and was admitted to Kitchener Military Hospital Brighton on 5 May 1919.  A week later on 12 May 1919 his application for a pension for having suffered typhus fever which was due, in his opinion, to “climactical and insanitary conditions” was rejected.  He was demobilised on 10 Jun 1919.
Dvr.
Barrett
Arthur William
2767
A/58
Born in Camberwell, Arthur William Barrett was the son of Alice Barrett of 23 Arnott Rd, Peckham and of the late W H Barrett.  He enlisted in Leeds and was killed in action on 25 Sep 1916, aged 22, along with 5 horses when a 60 pdr premature burst over his team.  He is buried in Bouzincourt Communal Cemetery Extension.
Sgt.
Bartlett    
Robert Walter Harry
695285
D/58
Robert Walter Harry Bartlett was a Bdr in the Territorial Force with service number 686, when he went overseas on 15 March 1915.  By Oct 1918 he was serving with D/58.  He ended the war as a Sgt and was eligible for a Silver War Badge.   He was discharged from the Army as being Surplus to Military Requirements on 11 May 1919.  
Dvr.
Bartlett    
William George
40940
D/58
A farm carter, from Dunfield, near Fairford, Glos, William George Bartlett enlisted in the Army aged 18 on 1 Jan 1906 for a period of 3 years with the colours and a further 9 in reserve.  He served in 141 Battery, until he had served his 3 years and was transferred to the reserves on 1 Jan 1909.  He married Laura Lydia Oatley on 24 Feb 1913 in Ashton Keynes, Wilts, and they emigrated to Australia.  When war was declared he was still in the reserves so was recalled to the UK in December 1914.  He was posted to 59th Howitzer Battery on 25 Jan 1915, with whom he went to France on 12 March 1915 then he was posted to 461 Battery, 118 Bde, on 18 May 1916 which became D/60 on 15 July 1916.  He was posted to D/58 on 29 Jan 1917.  He was wounded in action on 23 July 1917 with a bruised leg and ankle and was admitted to 133 Field Ambulance the same day, rejoining his unit on 5 Aug 1917.  He was awarded the Military Medal on 28 Jan 1918 for bravery in the field.  He was wounded again on 18 Sep 1918 with concussion to his head and a fractured spine and admitted to 4th Canadian Casualty Clearing Station, he was transferred to 14 Stationary Hospital in Wimereux who sent a telegram to his wife on 22 Sep 1918 to tell her that he was dangerously ill in Wimereux. He was transferred to the UK on HMHS “Princess Elizabeth” on 7 Oct 1918 and was transferred to Tooting Hospital where he died at 2pm on 19 Oct 1918.  He and Laura had no children.  In Jan 1919, Laura was sent his personal belongings which comprised 2 French half-pennies, a pay book, a diary, a tobacco pouch, a leather belt, a pocket knife, his identity disks, a match box holder, a cap badge, 2 pipes, a packet of letters and a medal ribbon.  She was awarded a widow’s pension of 13s 9d a week and returned to Australia towards the end of that year.   William is buried in St Swithin’s churchyard, Quenington, Glos.
2/Lt.
Barton
 
n/a
A/58
2/Lt Barton was posed to 58th Bde posted and assigned to A/58 on 28 Feb 1917, but just 3 days later, on 3 March 1917 he was posted to 11th Division Ammunition Column.  
Dvr.
Barwell
George Edwin
11831
58 Bde AC
A stable-hand from Burton-on-Trent, Staffs, George Edwin Barwell was born in Burton in 1895 and in 1911 was working as an errand boy, aged 16.  He enlisted in Coventry on 3 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.   He was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Sep 1914, and then to D/58 on 21 Jan 1915.  He was posted to B/99 on 7 Feb 1916, and finally to a Reserve Brigade on 30 Dec 1918.  He was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Chiseldon on 12 Feb 1919 and was demobilised on 13 March 1919.  After the war he was awarded a 7s 6d allowance for 70 weeks for a 6-14% disability due to malaria, and in late 1919 he married Doris Gostick.  He died in 1954 in Wellingborough, aged 59. 
Maj.
Batchelor
Vivian Allan
n/a
A/58
Vivian Allan Batchelor was born on 24 Aug 1882 in Caerleon, Monmouthshire, the only son of George Benjamin Batchelor, and his wife Mary (née Lewis).  He went to Rugby School (1896-1899) and was baptised in Holton, Oxfordshire on 13 April 1897.    He was commissioned on 21 Dec 1900 and 4 years later his mother, Mary, died.  Vivian joined A/58 from 59th Bde in Gallipoli on 7 Oct 1915 as the battery commander but was replaced by Capt Hayley three days later (10 Oct 15) and told to return to 59th Bde.  On 17 Feb 1916 he assumed command of 59th Bde when the OIC went sick and again briefly on 25 Feb 1917 until the new commander arrived the following day.    He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, which was gazetted on 17 Sep 1917, whose citation read: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at all times. During an intense bombardment of his battery, with H.E. by day and gas by night, he continually moved about, with an utter disregard of danger, extinguishing dumps that had been set on fire and warning his men at the outset of gas attacks. He brought his battery up in exceptionally quick time, and kept them in action by his magnificent example, and, although badly gassed and wounded, refused to leave them. He has also made daring and valuable personal reconnaissances on several occasions.”  He was awarded a bar to the DSO in the New Year’s Honours 1919, and the Belgian Croix de Guerre which was gazetted on 4 Sep 1919.  He was Mentioned in Despatches three times.  In 1928 he was a Lt Col when he retired from active service and joined the Reserve of Officers, and fully retired in 1932.  In 1965 he sold his home, The Old Rectory, Combe Florey, Somerset, to Evelyn Waugh.  He died on 20 Oct 1960.
Gnr.
Batten
Henry Charles Frederick
233475
D/58
Henry Charles Frederick Batten was the son of Henry and Mary Batten, from Caterham, Surrey.   In 1911 he was a 22-year old nurseryman and had been married to Mabel for 3 years. They had a son, Henry, aged 2.  All had been born in Caterham.  He enlisted in Redhill, Surrey.  He was killed in action on 3 Oct 1917 and is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery.  
Cpl.
Beale
Percy Ernest
10579
C/58
Percy Ernest Beale was born in 1886 in Bow, London, the 4th son of Frederick, a postal worker, and his wife Mary.  Percy became a grinder and married Elizabeth Carpenter, a photographic chemist, on 22 Oct 1910 at All Saints Church, Stepford.   While living at 26 Mount Pleasant, New Town, Yeovil with his wife Elizabeth and their 3-year old daughter Doris Lily, he enlisted in Yeovil on 1 Sep 1914, aged 28.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, then to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 1914.  He was appointed an A/Bdr in Nov 1914 and then a paid A/Bdr on 6 Feb 1915.  By this time 186 Battery had been re-numbered as C/58.  He was one of the witnesses to Gnr Walter Prince (10685) being absent between 10pm 3 Feb 1915 until found in bed at 7.05 am the next day, and for using insubordinate language to an NCO.  He was promoted to Bdr on 24 March 1915 and to Corporal on 19 April 1915.  On 15 May 1915 he was reprimanded by the OIC of 58 Bde, Lt Col Drake for neglect of duty, an offence witnessed by Sgt Copland.  He was promoted to Sgt on 6 Nov 1915 while serving in Gallipoli, with Bdr Chorley (10581) replacing him as A/Cpl.  He left 58 Bde on 24 June 1916 when he was posted to 5C Reserve Bde.  He was mobilised for active service on the North West Frontier of India on 6 May 1919 and was posted to 90th Battery on 24 Aug and then to 74th Battery four days later.  For this service he was awarded the Indian General Service campaign medal with the “Afghanistan NWF 1919” clasp.  He was demobbed on 31 March 1920.
Lt. Col.
Bedwell
Edward Parker
n/a
Bde Cdr
Born on 19 March 1878 in Southport, Lancs, Edward Parker Bedwell was the son of Staff-Commander Edward Parker Bedwell RN, a veteran of the Crimean War.  He served in the South African War 1899-1901 and NW Frontier of India in 1908.  He was promoted to Major on 30 Oct 1914.  He arrived in France with 28 Bde RFA on 10 Jan 1915.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches on 14 Dec 17 and then promoted to Lt Col on 22 March 1918.   He joined 58 Bde on 17 June 1918 and took command of the unit 2 days later, replacing Lt Col Wray who was sent home for 6 months’ rest.  On 9 July 1918 Lt Col Bedwell went to 11 Division Artillery (11 DA) HQ when the CRA was away for 10 days (presumably to act as the CRA), returning to the brigade on 21 July 1918.  He went on 7 days’ leave to Paris on 11 Aug 1918, returning on 21 Aug 1918 but remained at 11 DA HQ because the CRA was away again.  He rejoined the brigade on 23 Aug 18.  He went to 11 DA again on 24 Oct 1918, returning on 7 Nov 1918.  He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 22 Nov 1918, returning on 12 Dec 1918.  He again assumed command of 11 DA on 16 Dec 1918.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches again on 23 Dec 1918.  He fell sick and had to go to hospital on 7 Jan 1919, not returning until 27 Feb 1919.  He went on leave to the UK on 10 March 1919 but was struck off the strength of 58 Bde on 21 March 1919.  He was formally promoted to Lt Col on 1 March 1920, though with seniority dating back to 25 Oct 1916.  On 19 March 1933 he reached the age at which he would not be re-called, so was removed from the list of the Reserve of Officers.
Gnr.
Beech
Herbert George
970333
HQ?
The Absent Voters list for Wandsworth for October 1918 state that Herbert George Beech was a member of 58th Bde at the time.  There are civil records for a man of that name giving his birth and baptism in 1892, and he is also present in the Census for Wandsworth before the war.  His marriage certificate of 1916 gives his profession as “soldier”.  However, the only military records that appear to have survived list him as Henry George Beech.   
Dvr.
Beesley
Harry
10674
C/58
Henry Beesley was born on 6 April 1894 in Walsall Wood, Walsall, Staffs, the son of Richard and Annie Elizabeth Beesley.  His father was a coal merchant and Henry was a horse driver from at least the age of 16.   By the time he enlisted in Birmingham, aged 20, on 1 Sep 1914 he was calling himself Harry Beesley.  Harry was posted to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which was renamed as C/58 in Jan 1915.  While training at Milford Camp, he was reported by Sgt Copland as having overstayed his leave from midnight 25 May 1915 to 4.30pm the following day.  He was therefore sentenced by his battery commander, Capt Franklin, to being confined to barracks for 3 days.  Along with the rest of his battery, he embarked at Devonport on 1 July 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 14 Aug 1915.  While there he was found to be “absent from 10pm 24 Jul 15 to 11.50pm 24 Jul 15” so was sentenced to 7 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by Lt Col Drake.  He embarked at Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  He left Gallipoli a few weeks later on 8 Sep 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 23 Sep 1915, presumably due to sickness or injury.  On 21 Nov 1915 he was posted to 146 Bde Ammunition Column and so sailed from Alexandria on 30 Dec 1915, arriving at Salonika on 4 Jan 1916.  He joined 146 Bde’s 84 Small Arms Ammunition Column (SAAC), which became 84 SAAC of 3 Bde on 28 Aug 1917.  He was admitted to 148 Field Ambulance on 26 Sep 1918, was transferred to 48 General Hospital the following day, and then to 9 Convalescent Depot on 7 Oct 1918.  He was posted back to active service with 130 Bde Ammunition Column on 29 Oct 1918.   He returned to the UK in 1919 and was demobbed on 31 March 1920.  He married Millicent Hodson in 1924.  They had three children.  Harry passed away in 1972 aged 77.
Dvr.
Bell
James
144669
B/58
James Bell was posted away from the brigade on 9 July 1918 since he was found to be insufficiently fit for duty at the front so was sent to the Base.  He was subsequently posted to the Labour Corps, with a new service number: 571571.
A/Cpl.
Bell
James Thomas
710204
C/58?
James Thomas Bell was a member of the Territorial Force (service number 949) who was sent to France on 25 Sep 1914.  (Yet despite this date he was only awarded the 1914-15 Star rather than the 1914 Star for reasons that are not clear).  At some later point in the war he joined 58th Bde under his new service number and was replaced as an A/Cpl in the unit on 29 Jan 1919 because he was posted back to the UK for demobilisation. 
Gnr.
Bell  
Joseph
74801
C/58
Joseph Bell enlisted in Manchester.  On 15 Feb 1917, he was awarded the French Croix de Guerre for gallantry on the Somme.   He was killed in action on 25 Aug 1917 and is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery.
Gnr.
Bellaby
Ernest Alfred
L/23065
D/58
Ernest Alfred Bellaby was born on 15 Jan 1887, the son of William and Victoria Ann Bellaby.  He was a waterside labourer from 40 Lanelinch St, New Cross, SE London, when he enlisted on 24 April 1915 in Camberwell, aged 28.  He married Fanny Beatrice Cattrell the day before he enlisted.  He was posted initially to D/167 (How) Bde and was appointed Bdr on 31 Aug 1915 but reverted to Gunner on 19 Oct 1915.  He was wounded in his left leg and neck by shrapnel on 15 April 1917 and admitted to 32 Stationary Hospital Wimereux.  He was evacuated back to the UK on 22 April 1917.  On 20 Oct 1917 he was posted to D/58.  He was reported as being dangerously ill with multiple gunshot wounds on 23 Aug 1918 by 22 Casualty Clearing Station and his wife was informed by wire the next day.  His health improved and he was transferred to 13 (Harvard USA) General Hospital Boulogne on 26 Aug 1918.  On 7 May 1919 he was sent to the Convalescent Hospital Roehampton SW, and on 19 June 1919 he was discharged from the Army due to his wounds and awarded a Silver War Badge.   Fanny died in 1950, aged 60, and Ernest died in 1963, aged 75.
2/Lt.
Benham?
 
n/a
 
2/Lt Benham acted as the Liaison Officer with “the light battalion” on 4 Oct 1917.
Dvr.
Beschenkowsky
Joseph G C
87128
C/58
Joseph Beschenkowsky was born on 29 Nov 1896 in Dunkirk, France.  His father was living at 58 rue Neuse, Dunkirk.   He worked as a tailor and enlisted, probably in Devizes, Wilts, on 10 April 1915, aged 18 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there he went to 3A Reserve Bde on 13 April 1915, and then to Instruction Battery at Larkhill, Wilts, on 20 May 1915.  He was sent overseas that October and was assigned to C/58 on 26 Oct 1915.  On 21 March 1916, while at el Ferdan, Egypt, he committed the offence of “disobeying a lawful command given by a superior officer in execution of office” and was sentenced by a Field General Court Martial (FGCM) on 8 April 1916 to 6 months’ hard labour.  At some point thereafter he was posted to A/116 because on 30 Sep 1916, he committed a similar offence of insubordination and was again tried by FGCM, presided over by the Commander Royal Artillery of 26th Division.  That FGCM sentenced him on 6 Oct 1916, and after spending some of his sentence in Maidstone Gaol, in 1919 he was discharged from the Army for misconduct.   Because of his discharge, unlike other soldiers, he was not awarded his campaign medals.  On 21 Oct 1921 he arrived in Bristol as a seaman on the “Woodmansie” from Norfolk, Virginia. 
2/Lt.
Bevan   
Edgar Cyril
n/a
C/58
Edgar Cyril Bevan was born on 22 April 1895, the son of the Rev Canon William Bevan of Niagara Falls, Ontario.  Known as Cyril (or Cy).  He was a law student when war broke out and he enlisted on 4 Dec 1914 to join the Canadian Field Artillery in which he was promoted to Bdr.  He decided to seek a commission in the RFA, so attended and passed the 22/2 Royal School of Artillery course on 29 April 1915.  He was commissioned on 15 June 1915.  He was posted to C/58, arriving to join them in Gallipoli on 26 Oct 1915.   He acted as the Forward Observation Officer for his battery for the British attack along the Ancre on 3 Sep 1916.  He went on 10 days leave on 8 Dec 1916, and then while resting at Montigny-les-Jongleurs was sent on a signalling course at 11th Division’s Signalling School at Yvrench on 25 Jan 1917.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 15 May 1917.  He reported to the War Office in London prior to 6 weeks’ leave to Canada on 4 June 1917 so was struck off the strength of 58th Bde that day.  However, he returned to re-join C/58 on 1 Oct 1917 after having spent 5 weeks doing nothing in England causing the brigade’s Adjutant to fume “during this time when we were badly in need of officers”.  He was a candidate for the Commander Royal Artillery’s “examination of 2/Lts for promotion (1st sitting)” on 16 Dec 1917.   Four days later he was court martialled for drunkenness and “severely reprimanded”.   He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 23 Jan 1918, returning on 6 Feb 1918.  On 9 April 1918, along with many others in the unit, he was gassed and had to retire to the wagon lines.  He was therefore in hospital on 12 May 1918 as one of several officers sick.  He rejoined C/58 from hospital on 9 Aug 1918 but returned to hospital 2 days later.  He was appointed A/Capt on 14 Nov 1918 and was posted to 39 Division Ammunition Column.  He returned to Canada from overseas on 21 Feb 1920 and was demobbed on 13 Feb 1920.  He returned to his law studies at Osgoode Hall Law and graduated in 1924.   He married Olive Waddington later that year in Ontario, Canada, and they subsequently moved to Detroit, Michigan, USA, where Cyril practised as an attorney and was sometime a Democratic National Committeeman.  They had two daughters.  Olive passed away in 1964, aged 66, and Cyril died shortly afterwards on 5 Jan 1965, aged 69.  
Gnr.
Biddel
   
HQ
Gunner Biddell was a signaller who was wounded whilst mending telephone lines on 6 Nov 1916 and so had to be evacuated for treatment.  
Dvr.
Birch
William
11284
A/58
A fitter from Coventry, William Birch enlisted in Warwick on 3 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 184 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which became A/58 in Jan 1915.  He was absent from rollcall at Chapeltown Barracks on at least three occasions: 15 Nov 1914, 31 Jan 1915 and 17 Feb 1915. He was also absent without leave for 22 hours on 9-10 Jan 1915.  As a result, he was confined to barracks on each occasion by either the battery commander, Maj Crozier, or by 2/Lt Ellison.  He spent 3 days in hospital in Leeds between 2 and 5 Feb 1915 due to a boil.  He was awarded 10 days’ confinement to barracks and forfeited 2 days’ pay by Lt Col Drake for being absent from rollcall at 6 a.m. on 4 April 1915 and missing the same roll call the next day when “a prisoner at large”.  He was admonished by Capt Angus on 18 June 1915 for not complying with an order.  He embarked at Devonport to go overseas on 1 July 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 14 July 1915.  He sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  He was admitted to hospital on Gallipoli on 23 Nov 1915, rejoining his unit in Egypt on 26 Jan 1916.  He was wounded on 11 Sep 1916 with gunshot wounds to his left scalp and left hand.  Although both wounds were described as “slight”, he was evacuated to the UK from 13 General Hospital Boulogne on HS Jan Breydel on 13 Sep 1916.  He was in Westminster Hospital, London between 14 Sep and 7 Oct 1916, after which he was posted to 4C Reserve Bde on 20 Oct 1916.  He was again twice absent or overstayed his leave while with 48 Reserve Battery at Weedon (on 7 Nov 1916 and 16 Jan 1917).  He sailed from the UK on 23 Jan 1917 arriving in Salonika on 3 Feb 1917, where he was posted to B/XII Corps Ammunition Column on 31 July 1917, and then to 114 Bde Ammunition Column on 21 June 1918.  He was finally posted to 116 Bde on 5 Oct 1918, before being sent back to the UK on 28 April 1919 for demobilisation.
Capt.
Bird
Walter
n/a
A/58
Capt Bird joined 58th Bde on 2 Dec 1917 but the same day was selected to go to RA V Corps and went there the next day (along with 2/Lt Graham) and so was struck off strength.
Sgt.
Blackburn
Edward Colston
11151
B/58
Edward Colston Blackburn was born in 1893 in Bristol, the son of Edward John Blackburn and Lavinia Adelaide Blackburn (née Coram).  The family were living in Canterbury St, St.Phillips, Bristol at the time.  In 1911 Edward was working as a porter in a woollen warehouse and living with his widowed mother and five siblings in Barton Hill, Bristol.  He enlisted into the RFA in Bristol on 3 or 4 Sep 1914 and by January 1915 had been appointed a Bdr and was serving in B/58.  He was one of the witnesses to offences committed by Dvr Harris (10607) on 6 Jan 1915 as well as Gnr Ballard (10994) on 13 and 19 Jan 1915.  Edward Blackburn went overseas with 58 Bde in July 1915 and was serving as a Sgt in B/58 in the Ypres salient when he was killed in action on 10 Aug 1917.  He is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery.  
Far. Sgt.
Blackshaw
Charles
58481
A/58
Charles Blackshaw left A/58 on 12 Nov 1917 when HQ 11 Divisional Artillery sent orders for him to be transferred to 11 Division Ammunition Column.  
2/Lt.
Blaker
Richard Sidney
n/a
D/58
Richard Sidney Blaker was born in Simla, India, on 4 March 1893, and attended Bishop Cotton’s school in Simla.  He served in the Simla Volunteer Rifles and then, while studying at Queen’s College Oxford, in the Oxford University Officer Training Corps but had to leave that due to having flat feet.  Nevertheless, on 30 March 1916 he attested in the Army recruiting office in Ealing, London.  He was 23 years old and gave his profession as artist.  He went for training at No.2 RFA Officer Cadet School in Topsham Barracks, Exeter, and was commissioned as 2/Lt in the Special Reserve on 7 July 1916.  On 27 July 1916 he was posted to B/58 and then on 2 Oct 1916 to D/58.  His time in D/58 is recounted in detail in his semi-autobiographical novel, “Medal Without Bar”.  While the brigade was resting at Montigny-les-Jongleurs, he was transferred from D/58 to the Brigade HQ on 4 Feb 1917 to replace Lt Atchley as Assistant Orderly Officer because he had been evacuated sick.   When the brigade left Montigny-les-Jongleurs, on 20 Feb 1917, he went ahead of the brigade to find billets at their next stop.  He returned to D/58 soon after.  On 12 April 1917 he was admitted to hospital and was discharged to duty by 1/3 Northumbrian Field Ambulance on 22 April 1917.  He was sick and so left 58th Bde on 10 July 1917.  On 1 Aug 1917 he sailed from Boulogne to Folkestone on sick leave granted by 14 General Hospital, Wimereux due to severe facial neuralgia and boils.   The Consultant Dermatologist to the Military Hospitals in London, diagnosed him on 22 Aug 1917 with furunculosis and that he needed a sedentary job due to a strained foot.  The boils had started in April 1917.  On 4 Sep 1917 he was posted to 1209 Battery RFA at Frinton-on-Sea and he reported for duty there on 13 Sep 1917.  He was promoted to Lt on 7 Jan 1918 and finished the war serving with 74th Division.  He was demobbed on 7 March 1919 and resigned his commission on 23 Jan 1920.   After the war he became a successful author and visited Hollywood to work on film scripts – though the films were never made.  In his private life, when he was 18, he started having an affair with his uncle’s wife Mamie with whom he had a daughter, Betty.  He and Mamie married in 1921 in Michigan but the divorced in 1938 and he married Agnes Mayo Owen.  He died on 18 Feb 1940 in Los Angeles, aged 46.  Some attributed his early death to wounds received during his wartime service.  He is buried in Inglewood Park Cemetery, Los Angeles.    
Dvr.
Blane
George Samuel
156294
A/58
George Samuel Blane was born in Southwark, London, in 1882.  He married Ellen Strong on Christmas Day 1901 and they had 4 children.  He enlisted in Woolwich and joined the Royal Army Veterinary Corps as a horse keeper with service number SE/6213.  At some point he transferred to the artillery and was assigned to A/58.  On 20 Aug 1918 he died of wounds received, aged 36.  He is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, France.
Bdr.
Boddington
   
C/58?
Bdr Boddington was one of the witnesses to Gnr Walter Prince (10685) being absent between 10pm 3 Feb 1915 until found in bed at 7.05 am the next day, and for using insubordinate language to an NCO.  He also witnessed the absence without leave between 14 and 21 Feb 1915 of Gnr Sidney Edwards (11256).  
Gnr.
Bolt
Harold
215839
A/58
Harold Bolt was born on 8 Feb 1883 in Birkenhead, Cheshire, the son of William John and Ada Mary Alice Bolt (née Oxton).  He was living in Stretford, Lancs in 1911 and working as a self-employed cabinetmaker.  On 1 Sep 1911, he married Annie Elizabeth French in St Agnes Church, Birch-in-Rusholme, Manchester and they had a daughter Ethel Elizabeth on 7 Oct 1913.  He was working as a self-employed home furnisher when he enlisted on 2 Jan 1917 in Chester.  He was posted to No.2 Depot at Preston on 2 Apr 1917 and was mustered on 9 Nov 1917 as a gunner in 6B Reserve Bde, Edinburgh.  He went to France on 7 Apr 1918 and joined A/58 as a driver on 17 Apr 1918.  He was appointed an acting paid Lance Bdr on 9 Aug 1918 and as a driver paid A/Bdr on 22 Dec 1918.  He was still serving in A/58 on 15 Feb 1919 when he was replaced as a paid A/Bdr by Gnr William Mathieson (104159).  This may have been because he was leaving the unit to return to the UK ready for demobilisation, because he left France on 5 Mar 1919, went to the Dispersal Centre at Prees Heath on 12 Mar 1919 and was demobilised on 10 Apr 1919.  He applied for a pension due to trouble with his right knee which had been caused by an injury sustained on 17 Feb 1918 during stables at Redford Barracks, Edinburgh, while he was serving in 36 Reserve Battery RFA.  That had caused him to be on light duties for a few weeks and the Medical Officer had thought at the time that the knee might “go” at any time and he would probably need an operation.  He was unsuccessful in his application for a pension since the injury was not deemed to be attributable to his military service.   After his demobilisation he returned to Cheshire giving his address as the Manor House, Heatley.  He and Annie had a son, William Duncan Bolt in 1920 by which point they were living in Devon.  In 1939 he and his family were living in Plympton St Mary, Devon, and he was working in the catering trade.  During World War Two he also served as an ARP warden.  Annie passed away in 1968 in Torbay, and Harold died in June 1972 in Torbay, aged 89. 
Gnr.
Bond
Albert
159994
A/58
Albert Bond was born in Crossens, Lancs.  He enlisted in Southport, Lancs, and on 3 June 1917 died of wounds.  He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France.
2/Lt.
Borthwick
Cecil Hamilton
n/a
B/58
Cecil Hamilton Borthwick was born on 3 July 1887. His father, Edward, was a clergyman. He studied at Cambridge University (1906-09). He was appointed a Temporary 2/Lt in the RFA on 23 Sep 1914 having been a cadet in an Officer Training Corps and was assigned to 185 Battery. He sat on the Court of Enquiry into Dvr Chaplin’s accident in Nov 1914, and punished Gnr Ballard for an offence on 1 Jan 1915. He sailed from Liverpool on 1 July 1915 on the SS “Empress Britain” for Alexandria. While serving at Gallipoli he was ordered on 4 Sep 1915 to be ready to take charge of 116 men being sent away from the peninsular. It may be at this point that he left 58th Bde. On 25 June 1916 he was made a temporary Lt. He was awarded the Military Cross which was gazetted on 18 March 1918 “for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the enemy carried out a destructive shoot on the battery position ammunition pit and one of the guns were set on fire. With two others he at once extinguished the fire, and saved the gun. He showed great coolness and contempt of danger.” He married Sybil May Morton Carter in 1919 and resigned his commission on 25 Jan 1920. After the war he played minor counties cricket (for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Kent 2nd XI) as a wicket keeper in the 1920s and 30s and was in partnership running a private school in Kent. On 29 July 1939, shortly before the Second World War broke out, he was commissioned as a Captain in a National Defence company. He died on 30 Dec 1977 in Diss, Norfolk, aged 90. His wife Sybil died in 1993, aged 96.
Gnr.
Bottoms
Ernest
150644
B/58
A 35-year old bricklayer originally from Borrowash, Derbyshire.  Ernest Bottoms had married Louisa Esther Walker (sometimes written as Esther Louisa Walker) on 15 Nov 1913 and they were living in Balham, London when he attested on 11 Dec 1915.  He did not enlist immediately, instead on 16 June 1915 he was instructed to report to the Town Hall, Wandsworth, on 30 June 1916: “You are hereby warned that you will be required to rejoin for service with the Colours on the 30 Jun 1916.  You should therefore present yourself at Town Hall, Wandsworth, on the above date, not later than 11am o’clock (sic), bringing this paper with you.”  He enlisted in Clapham, Kingston-upon-Thames that day.  He was posted to RFA No.6 Training School, Biscott, Luton on 3 July 1916 and then sent overseas to France on 10 Dec 1916.  He joined 19 DAC on 16 Dec 1916 and then A/87 on 1 Jan 1917 but was admitted to a Casualty Clearing Station on 15 March 1917 with inflammation of connecting tissue in his heel.  He was transferred to No.7 Canadian General Hospital on 17 March 1917 and evacuated to the UK on HMHS “Warilda” on 22 March 1917.  He stayed in East Leeds War Hospital from 23 March to 28 July 1917, and then in hospital in Royal Artillery Command Depot, South Camp, Ripon from 6 Aug to 14 Sep 1917 still with a problem with his foot.  He was posted to B/58 on 20 Oct 1917.  One year later he was granted 14 days leave with rations between 20 Oct and 3 Nov 1918.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance on 18 Dec 1918 with a fractured clavicle and was transferred to 3rd Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, from 31 Dec 1918 to 15 Feb 1919 with a “simple fracture to right clavicle”.  He was posted to 14 Reserve Bde at Larkhill on 25 Feb 1919 and then to the Dispersal Centre at Crystal Palace on 15 Apr 1919 ready for demobilisation.  
2/Lt.
Boulton
 
n/a
A/58
On 26 Sep 1916 he had a near shave during the battle of Thiepval when his horse was killed under him and he was “badly shaken up”.  On 10 Oct 1916 he was posted from A/58 to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC).  He must have returned to A/58 since he was again posted from there to 11 DAC on 2 Dec 1916. 
Gnr.
Bourne
Edwin George
815097
D/58
Born in Teddington, Middx, on 20 Dec 1890 to Anthony and Isabella Bourne, Edwin George Bourne was 27 years old when, on 23 Aug 1918, he was in a group of men trying to get a wagon out of a ditch.  As they worked, an enemy aeroplane swooped down and dropped 5 bombs on them.  Edwin was one of nine men who were killed with one more later dying of wounds.  He is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension along with 7 of those killed alongside him.
Maj.
Bowly
David
n/a
B/58
Born on 2 Oct 1865 in Siddington, Glos, David Bowly attended Marlborough College and joined the Army in about 1886, serving in 21st Lancers.  While serving with his regiment in Dublin, he was found to have been “connected” with the case of a young officer who was subjected to bullying and pressured to resign from the Army.  As a result, Maj Bowly was called on to retire from the Army which he did on 15 Aug 1903, aged 37, and joined the Reserve of Officers.  As a result of his “misconduct” his retirement pay was reduced by 20%.  In 1911 he was still single and living in Cirencester, Glos.   He rejoined the Army though was assessed on 31 Jul 1917 as only fit for light duties.  He was posted to join 58 Bde for duty in the horse lines just before the Armistice on 27 Oct 1918 and went on 14 days’ leave to England on 7 March 1919.  He died of chronic endocarditis in Hove, Sussex, on 16 Oct 1926 aged 61.  His sister, Maria Bowly, was with him when he passed away.
Gnr.
Boyland
   
A/58
Gnr Boyland was granted 10 days leave to England on 25 Oct 1916.   
2/Lt.
Bragg
Robert Charles
n/a
A/58
The son of British parents William and Gwendoline Bragg, Robert Charles Bragg was born in Adelaide, Australia on 25 Nov 1892 while his father was a professor at the University of Adelaide.  He attended Oundle School (1909-1911) and while studying at Trinity College Cambridge he enlisted into the territorial cavalry regiment King Edward’s Horse (with service number 227) on 28 May 1913.  He joined C Squadron and was appointed a L/Cpl on 31 Jan 1914 and after war was declared was mobilised on 5 Aug 1914.  He was promoted to Corporal on 24 Nov 1914, but he had decided that he was more likely to see action in the artillery so was discharged on 29 Nov 1914 and was commissioned as a Temporary 2/Lt in the RFA the following day and was assigned to A/58.  He represented his battery when King George V inspected 11th (Northern) Division on 31 May 1915 on Witley Common, Surrey.  He sailed from Devonport on SS “Knight Templar” on 1 July 1915 with his battery.  On 1 Sep 1915, while censoring letters in his dugout at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, he was struck by a Turkish shell which failed to explode but severed one leg and badly damaged the other.  He was evacuated onto HMHS “Nevasa” where he had the damaged leg amputated but he died on board the following day and was buried at sea.  He died shortly before his father and brother were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics.
Sgt.
Brasse
Horace Joseph
10541
B/58
Horace Brasse was born on 25 March 1889 in Northampton.  He enlisted in Coventry.  He was the husband of May Brasse and died of wounds on 15 Aug 1915, probably the first of 58th Bde’s casualties after they went into action.  He is buried on Gallipoli in Hill 10 Cemetery.  
BSM
Brice    
Frank Lea
32074
A/58
Frank Lea Brice was born in 1888 to George and Sarah Brice in Lea, Kent.  In 1911 he was serving in the RFA in India as a Bombardier.  He married Florence Maud Barnard in 1913.  He joined A/58 as their Battery Sgt Major in late August 1916 and was described by the commanding officer of his battery as “a real good man”.  During the night of 2/3 Jun 1917, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for “Conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  Although severely gassed and badly shaken by a shell which penetrated his gun-pit, he immediately carried a wounded comrade to the dressing station under heavy shell fire.  In view of his own condition, his conduct throughout the whole bombardment was particularly gallant.”  His award was confirmed on 10 Jul 1917 and gazetted on 25 Aug 1917.  He ended the war as a Warrant Officer 2nd Class and died in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, on 16 Dec 1935.  
Cpl.
Bricknell
C
   
Cpl C Bricknell was convicted of theft by a Court Martial held at el Ferdan, Egypt, on 29 and 30 Mar 1916 so was reduced to the ranks and awarded 1 month’s Field Punishment No.1.
Capt.
Bridge
Charles Edward Dunscombe
n/a
OIC C/58
Charles Edward Dunscombe Bridge (sometimes spelled Charles Edward Dunscomb Bridge) was born on 22 Feb 1886 in Aldershot, Hants.  In 1901 he was a 15-year-old student in the College, Army House, Aldershot.  On 21 Dec 1907 he was promoted to Lt, so must have been commissioned a few years previously.  He was promoted to Capt on 30 Oct 1914 and was graded for pay as a Staff Captain from 10 Feb 1915, relinquishing that role on 9 Sep 1915 when he was restored to the establishment and seconded for service on the staff as a General Staff Officer (GSO) 2nd Grade which resulted in him being made a temporary Major.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 14 Jan 1916 and was Mentioned in Dispatches on 1 July 1916.  He relinquished his role as GSO 2nd Grade on 17 July 1916 and was appointed instead as GSO 3rd Grade, resulting in him reverting to Capt.  He left that post on 16 Sep 1916 when he was restored to the establishment.  He married Florence Mildred Georgena Canning Hall on 10 Oct 1916.  He was promoted to Major on 1 Nov 1916 (though the promotion was antedated to 21 Oct 1916).  He was 11 Division Artillery’s acting Brigade Major in mid-Nov 1916.  On 29 Nov 1916, he took command of C/58.   Maj Bridge acted as 58 Bde Commander from 6 Dec 1916 while Lt Col Winter was acting as CRA, until about 29 Dec 1916 when Maj Bridge went on a course.  Maj Bridge MC was appointed GSO 2nd Grade on 12 Feb 1917 probably at the same time as he was posted as acting liaison officer with the Belgian Army.  He was appointed GSO 1st Grade on 28 Aug 1918 and made a temporary Lt Col as a result.  He was serving in Italy as British Liaison Officer to the Italian Third Army towards the end of the war.  Lt Col Bridge DSO MC relinquished his rank of Lt Col and reverted to Major on leaving his appointment as GSO 1st Grade on 16 Feb 1919 and was restored to the establishment as a supernumerary Major.  On 20 Jan 1920 he was made GSO 2nd Grade at the War Office.  As a result of his service in the war he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, the Military Cross and the Belgian Croix de Guerre.  He served as Assistant Military Attaché in Washington in the early 1920s.   In 1939, Lt Col Bridge was Secretary General of the British Council.  In 1948 Brigadier Bridge and his wife travelled to Kenya where he served as a District and County Councillor.   He died in London in 1961, aged 74.  
Gnr.
Bridgman
Herbert Septimus
10688
C/58
The son of James and Annie Bridgman, Herbert Septimus Bridgman was born in 1891 in Elmore, Glos.  He enlisted in Atherstone, Warks, on 1 Sep 1914, aged 23.  He had been a groom in civilian life.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which became C/58 in Jan 1915.  Along with much of 58th Bde he sailed from Devonport on 1 July 1915 arriving at Alexandria on 14 July 1915 and then went to Gallipoli.  He was admitted to hospital on Gallipoli on 4 Oct 1915 and was evacuated from there to Malta on HMHS “Nevasa” on 14 Oct 1915.  From there he was evacuated back to the UK on HMHS “Egypt” on 22 Nov 1915.  He was posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 29 Nov 1915 and appointed an A/Bdr on 23 July 1916.  He was sent to France on 29 July 1916 and was posted to join 29 Division Ammunition Column (DAC) on 6 Aug 1916, but 2 days later was attached to 20 DAC.  He was admitted to 2/2 London Casualty Clearing Station on 17 Feb 1917 with inflammation of connecting tissue in his heel.  Having been discharged to Base from No.2 Convalescence Depot on 20 March 1917, he was assigned to B/317 on 25 April 1917.  He was admitted to 149 Field Ambulance on 28 Dec 1917, transferred to 9 Australian General Hospital in Abbeville on New Year’s Eve 1917 and then evacuated back to the UK on Hospital Ship Panama on 4 Jan 1918.  He returned to France on 27 April 1918 and was assigned to C/78 on 9 May 1918.  He remained with them until 26 April 1919 when he was posted briefly to 17 DAC and then returned to the UK on 26 May 1919 for demobilisation.  He was formally demobbed on 31 March 1920.  
Bdr.
Briggs
   
B/58?
Bdr Briggs was witness to Dvr Herbert Franklin (10922) neglecting to obey an order while at Milford Camp on 15 May 15.
Gnr.
Brightman
Wesley
54259
D/58
Wesley Brightman was born in 1897 in Sittingbourne, Kent, to Thomas and Elizabeth Brightman.  He enlisted at Sheerness, on the Isle of Sheppey, Kent.  He was one of a party of men from D/58 under the direction of Capt C F Roberts who were trying to get one of their howitzers out of a shell hole on 16 April 1917 when an enemy shell fell nearby.  Wesley was badly wounded and was taken to a Field Ambulance where he died of his wounds, aged 19.  He is buried in Beaumetz Cross Roads Cemetery, Beaumetz-les-Cambrai, France.  
Lt.
Brittan
Charles Hugh
n/a
A/58
Born on 16 Oct 1893, Charles Hugh Brittan was commissioned on 18 July 1913 into the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA).  He went to France with 8th Siege Battery, RGA on either 14 or 16 Oct 1914.  He was awarded the Military Cross (gazetted on 25 Nov 1916) “For conspicuous gallantry in action. He carried out a daring reconnaissance under heavy fire, and obtained most valuable information. He has previously rendered valuable services”.  In 1916 he wrote a 12-page booklet “Notes on German Shells and Fuzes” to help fellow soldiers recognise German shells and fuzes.  He joined 60 Bde RFA on 22 Sep 16 and on 25 Jan 1917 he was posted from HQ 60 Bde RFA to join 58 Bde while they were resting at Montigny-les-Jongleurs, where he arrived two days later.  He probably left 58 Bde when was appointed an adjutant on 5 March 1917.   He ended the war as a Captain and stayed on in the Army, working probably at No.4 Officers Cadet School, Preston Barracks, Brighton as well as spending some time in Quetta.  He served again during WW2 and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in 1940 when a Lt Col in charge of 2 Medium Regt, RA.   At various times he was made an Acting Colonel, a Temporary Colonel and a Temporary Brigadier.  When he retired in 1948, he was granted the honorary rank of Brigadier.  He died in Hampshire in 1964.  
Lt. Col.
Broughton
Legh Harley Delves
n/a
Bde Cdr
Legh Harley Delves Broughton was born on 28 Oct 1873 in Punjab, India, the son of Maj Gen William Edward Delves Broughton.  He attended the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, was commissioned on 6 April 1893.  He was promoted to Lt on 6 April 1896 and to Captain on 14 June 1900.  He fought in the Boer War between 1900 and 1902.  The following year he married Constance Emily Randall Johnson on 3 June 1903, they had four children.  He had retired as a Major sometime before 1911.  He rejoined active service and on 21 Dec 1915 was made a Temporary Lt Col having previously been a Major in the Reserve of Officers.  On 12 July 1916 he was Mentioned in Dispatches for distinguished and gallant service during the period of Gen Charles Munro’s command of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  He commanded 60 Bde RFA until it was broken up on 25 Jan 17 at which point he was a supernumerary Lt Col in 11 Division Artillery.  During his time in 60 Bde he also was temporarily appointed acting Commander Royal Artillery of 11 Division on 31 Jul 16.  He arrived to take temporary command of 58 Bde on 17 Feb 1917 but left again 2 days later when Lt Col Winter returned.  A week later he left 59 Bde to return to the UK to take command of an Army Field Artillery Bde.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches three further times, on 18 May 1917, 14 June 1918 and 1919.  On 9 May 1919 he was promoted to Lt Col.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in 1919.  He died on 15 May 1942, aged 68, in Devon.
Gnr.
Brown
Cecil Charles
89441
D/58
Cecil Charles Brown was wounded on 17 Nov 1917, the same day as his friend Bdr Willie Loader (62538) was killed.   He wrote to one of his battery’s officers, 2/Lt Richard Blaker on about 29 Nov 1917 from Ward 6C, 4 Scottish General Hospital, Glasgow to tell him what happened to him after being wounded: he was in feeling “pretty well” but suffered “awful pain” when he coughed.  After being wounded he had walked from the Battery positions to Payien at which point he was “soaked through & through with blood”.  He didn’t recall anything further until he got to the Casualty Clearing Station, where he stayed for 2 days before going to hospital in Rouen for 4 days after which he was evacuated back to the UK.  He ended the war as a Bdr.  He had married Lisa E Brown who was living in Bourneville, Birmingham when he was wounded.   After the war their address was Holmlea, Fairmead Ave, Westcliff-on-Sea.  Cecil Brown was portrayed affectionately by Richard Blaker in his semi-autobiographical novel “Medal Without Bar” as Gnr Browne, the cook for the D/58 officers – though the fictional character was killed by the premature rather than surviving with a “Blighty”.
A/Bdr.
Brown
Charles  
11171
A/58
From Blankney, near Lincoln, Charles Brown was the son of Charles Brown of Harston, Grantham, Lincs.  In 1911 he was a servant at Measham Fields Farm, Measham, Derby.    He enlisted in Oxford on 31 Aug 14 as a 26-year old footman.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 184 Battery on 9 Sep 1914.  He was vaccinated on 15 Sep 1914, had his first TV inoculation on 26 Nov 1914 and his second TV inoculation on 7 Dec 1914.  In Jan 184 Battery became A/58.  He was appointed a paid A/Bdr on 8 June 1915 and sailed from Devonport on 1 July 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 July 1915.  He embarked at Alexandria on 25 June 1916, arriving at Marseilles on 3 July 1916.  On 17 Oct 1916 he was posted to 25 Division Ammunition Column but was posted back to A/58 on 2 Feb 1917.  He was appointed A/Bdr “vice Fergusson” on 24 Jan 17 when he was apparently in A/58 so the dates cannot be quite right.  He was wounded in action on 23 April 1917 but was discharged back to duty the following day.  He was granted leave to the UK between 18 and 29 May 1917, and again on 15 Feb 1918.  He joined 1st Army Anti-Tank School on 11 Aug 1918 but must have returned to 58th Bde at some point after that because he was posted from the brigade on 22 Jan 1919 for demobilisation to Harrowby Discharge Centre as “L.S. Man”.  After the war his address was given as Shot over House, Wheatley, Oxon, a large 18th century country house.
Gnr.
Brown
Ernest
76991
C/58
Ernest Brown was born in Walsall, Staffs, which is also where he enlisted.  He had been a corporal but reverted to being a gunner on 4 April 1917.  He was killed in action on 3 June 1917 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Dvr.
Brown
John
92744
D/58
John Brown was born in Keeney, Cavan, and enlisted in Glasgow.  He died of wounds on 30 Oct 1918 and is buried in Villers-en-Cauchies Communal Cemetery, France.
Dvr.
Brown
Walter H
696795
B/58
Walter H Brown had served in the Territorial Force with service number 3184.  In Oct 1918 he was absent from his home town of Preston and serving with B/58 so was entitled to a vote by proxy in elections.
Bdr.
Browne
Herbert William
39280
D/58
Herbert William Browne was serving as a Bdr in D/58 when he was wounded in early 1917 and evacuated to the UK.  His place was taken by William Isaac.  Herbert finished the war as an A/Sgt.  
Gnr.
Buckton
James
112099
B/58
James Buckton was absent from his home town of Hartshead, West Yorks, in Oct 1918 and serving with B/58 so was entitled to a vote by proxy in elections.
Gnr.
Bull  
Ernest James
68496
C/58
Ernest James Bull enlisted on 10 Jan 1915.  He was from Kingston-on-Thames.  He was sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917.  When an A/Bdr he was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 23 Feb 1918.  He ended the war as a Corporal and was demobbed on 24 Feb 1919.    
2/Lt.
Bull   
Roland Osborne
n/a
B/58
Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in June 1885, the son of Manlius and Mary Bull (née Nixon) both of Winnipeg, Roland Osborne Bull was educated at Trinity College, Port Hope, Ontario and the Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario where he was a Gentleman Cadet in 1914.  He was commissioned into the RFA on 22 Jan 1915 and joined 58 Bde.  He embarked on SS “Karroo” in Devonport on 5 July 1915 as part of D/58, arriving in Alexandria on 18 July 1915.  With his battery he served at Gallipoli.  It is likely that he transferred along with his battery to 133 Bde while in Egypt in the Spring of 1916 when D/58 became A/133.  He was promoted to Lt on 8 Aug 1916 and was awarded the Military Cross “For conspicuous gallantry as F.O.O., when for 80 hours he maintained communications by runner or telephone, thus being able to. supply most valuable information, which greatly contributed to the success of the operations.”  The award was gazetted on 14 Nov 1916.  When A/133 was split up towards the end of 1916, Lt Bull rejoined 58 Bde on 29 Nov 1916.  He transferred back to the UK to the home establishment on 14 March 1917 to provide training for recruits and cadets.  He sailed from Glasgow to New York 17-24 April 1918 to get married to Edna Weston Montgomery on 2 May 1918.  Then arrived back in Liverpool on board the “Metagama” from New York on 10 July 1918.  They had two daughters and one son.  (The son, Roland Montgomery Bull was killed in action in WW2 while serving in the RCAF flying Mosquitos).  Lt Bull was made an acting Captain on 11 Sep 1918 and resigned his commission on 4 April 1919.  In 1924 one of Edna’s sisters, Mary Elzina Montgomery, married one of Roland’s old comrades, Robert Rowbotham.  Bull and Rowbotham had served alongside each other for much of the war.  Much of Bull’s civilian career was in the investment business and he rose to become Vice President of Gairdner & Co. Ltd. and was a director in several other companies.   In World War 2 he was commissioned as a Major in the Veterans Guard in 1940, promoted to Lt Colonel in 1941 and to Colonel in 1942.  He was commandant of Prisoner-of-War Camps from 1941 until his retirement in 1944, and was in command of Camp 30 in Bowmanville, Ontario, when two German officers escaped dressed as workmen.  He died on 15 Nov 1972 (his wife having pre-deceased him and he having re-married).   A park in British Columbia is named R O Bull Memorial Park after him.  
BQMS
Bull    
   
C/58
BQMS Bull joined C/58 from 60th Bde on 2 Oct 1916 to replace BQMS Prestidge.  He was promoted to Temporary Regimental Sgt Major on 27 Nov 17 but with effect from 2 May 17.  RSM Bull went on 14 days’ leave to England on 12 July 1918.  
2/Lt.
Burd   
John Marsh
n/a
C/58
John Marsh Burd was born on 10 Sep 1896 in Okehampton, Devon.  He was commissioned into the RFA on 10 Feb 1915 after training at the Royal Military Academy and joined C/58.  On 1 July 1915 he sailed from Liverpool on the “Empress Britain” bound for Alexandria.  He was serving at Gallipoli with C/58 when he was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) for 1 month from 25 Oct 1915 and made a Flying Officer (Observer).  His apparent qualifications were that he was “light weight, can read morse slowly, permanent commission”.   He probably decided to stay in the RFC since he qualified as a pilot and obtained his Royal Aero Club Certificate on 1 Oct 1916 at the Military School, Huntingdon, qualifying on the Maurice Farman biplane.  He had been promoted to Lt on 8 Aug 1916 and was made a Flying Officer on 14 Dec 1916.  On 17 Aug 1917, he was promoted to Flight Commander (and so was made a temporary Captain) and served in 55 Sqn.  He was awarded the Military Cross, which was gazetted on 23 April 1918 “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a leader of long-distance bomb raids. When returning from a raid he attacked ten enemy aeroplanes which were engaged with another of our formations. He shot down two and his observer another, and he then brought his formation back without loss. In six raids he only lost one machine. He has been leader in seventeen operations and deputy leader in eleven.”  After the war, he was re-seconded to the RAF for a period of 2 years from 1 Aug 1919 and played hockey for the RAF in a game against the Army on 5 Feb 1921.  He returned to the Army when the two years were over but returned back to the RAF being granted a permanent commission as a Flying Officer on 1 Nov 1927 and was promoted back to Flt Lt from Flying Officer on 1 Jan 1928.  He died aged 34 on 12 Oct 1930 in the British General Hospital, RAF Hinaidi, Baghdad, Mesopotamia.
2/Lt.
Burdge
Reginald John
n/a
C/58
Son of Thomas George and Martha Hood Burdge, Reginald John Burdge was born on 5 Apr 1887 in Stroud Green, London.  He worked as a traveller for a blouse manufacturer.  He enlisted in the Territorial Force on 16 Aug 1915, joining 1/1 West Kent (Queen’s Own) Yeomanry (service number initially 245315, then 2047) as a private, later being promoted to L/Cpl.  He agreed to serve overseas and was posted to Mutrah in Egypt, on 16 Mar 1916.  He applied for a commission so went to Alexandria and sailed from there on 6 Dec 1916, arriving back in the UK on 22 Dec 1916 to attend Cadet School in Exeter.  He was commissioned into the RFA Special Reserve on 3 June 1917 and went to France, arriving in Le Havre on 21 Sep 17.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 26 Sep 1917 and was transferred to C/58 the following day.  Less than a fortnight later, 11th Division was taking part in the Battle of Poelcappelle on 9 Oct 1917 when 58 Bde was receiving little news of the progress of the attack, so 2/Lt Burdge was sent forwards.  He was hit in the stomach by a sniper and died shortly afterwards in 18 Corps Main Dressing Station.  He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.  
2/Lt.
Burdon-Sanderson
Richard Lionel
n/a
186 Bty
Born on 22 April 1894, Richard Lionel Burdon-Sanderson was educated at Charterhouse 1908-12.  He was commissioned into the RFA on 19 Sep 1914 and joined 186 Battery.  He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and passed his flying test on 29 Oct 1915 at the Military School, Brooklands, flying a Maurice Farman biplane.  He was made a 2/Lt on probation the same day and was made a Flying Officer on 19 Feb 1916.  He was promoted to Acting Lt on 1 Aug 1918 and to Acting Capt 3 months later on 1 Nov 1918.  His younger brother Guy was killed in 1917 serving in the Northumberland Fusiliers.  Richard died on 23 Dec1983.
A/Sgt.
Burgoyne
George Frederick Thomas
10594
B/58
Born in 1894 in Birmingham, George Frederick Thomas Burgoyne was working as a junior clerk in an insurance company in 1911 when he was 16 years old.  He enlisted in 1914 and had been promoted to Acting Sgt by 15 Mar 1915 but was a Cpl by 20 Mar 1915. While serving at Gallipoli he went sick and was replaced as Cpl by another man on 2 Sep 1915, so it is likely that he left 58 Bde at that point.  On 14 July 1918 he was commissioned as 2/Lt and joined 322(S) Battery RGA.  After the war a 29-year old insurance official from Birmingham called George Frederick Burgoyne sailed on SS “Baltic” from Liverpool for New York on 10 May 1924 intending to live in Mexico. 
Gnr.
Burke
Edward
10610
C/58
A 19-year old brazier from Walsall, Staffs, Edward Burke enlisted in Birmingham on 1 Sep 1914.  After initial posting to No.3 Depot at Hilsea he was posted to 186 Bty (later C/58) on 10 Sep 1914.  He embarked at Devonport on 1 Jul 1914, disembarking in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No.2 by Lt Col Drake for being absent between 10pm and 11.50pm on 24 Jul 1915 at Zahrieh Camp.  He re-embarked at Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.   He was admitted to hospital on Gallipoli on 28 Oct 1915 and transferred to 17 General Hospital Alexandria with diarrhoea on 2 Nov 1915, before rejoining his unit in Egypt on 22 Jan 1916.  He sailed from Alexandria on 25 Jun 16, arriving at Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  He was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK between 18 and 27 Jan 1917.  On 25 Mar 1917 he was awarded 2 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by his battery commander Capt Franklin for having dirty harness.  He was appointed a paid acting L/Bdr on 19 Apr 1918 but reverted to Driver a few weeks later on becoming surplus to the establishment.  He was granted 1 days’ leave to the UK shortly after the Armistice and was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Clipstone on 22 May 1919 ready for demobilisation, having served in 58th Bde throughout the war.  It is likely that he died in Walsall in 1957 aged 62.  
2/Lt.
Burton
Frank
n/a
 
2/Lt Frank Burton was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt on 23 Jan 1915.  He sailed from Liverpool on 1 Jul 1915 on the Empress Britain for Alexandria as part of 58th Bde.  While serving at Gallipoli he was wounded on 18 Aug 1915 and was probably evacuated and struck off the brigade’s strength.  Between 8 Jun and 11 Sep 1919, he was made an acting Captain while temporarily second-in-charge of a battery.  
2/Lt.
Burton
Henry John Topping
n/a
A/58
Henry John Topping Burton was born on 20 Oct 1883 in Worpenden, Sussex.  He worked as a billiard marker and then joined the Army aged 18 on 23 Jan 1902 at Woolwich.  He was given service number 21527 and he served as a gunner in the RHA, including in India between October 1903 and February 1909.  After returning to the UK he was stationed at Ipswich when he deserted on 12 Feb 1911.  After being found and tried by Court Martial, he spent 42 days in detention and was restored to duty on 15 May 1911.  While serving in “F” Battery RHA he was injured in an accident at Larkhill Camp on 1 May 1913 and a Board of Officers concluded that he was not to blame.  He married Kathleen Powell at Bulford Camp on 16 May 1914.  After war was declared he was swiftly promoted from A/Bdr to Cpl on 5 Aug 1914 and went to France with 23 Battery, 40 Bde RFA on 20 Aug 1914.  He was promoted on 10 Feb 1915 to Sgt, and left France when he was posted to join No.3 Depot at Hilsea on 25 Sep 1915 serving in 15 Reserve Battery from 30 Sep 1915.  He was posted to B/171 Bde (which became D/169) on 22 Dec 1915 but on 8 Jan 1916 he was posted to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and then just two months later he was sent to France where he stayed until he was commissioned in the field on 26 Feb 1917.  He married again, describing himself as a bachelor, on 17 Mar 1917 to Rose Porcher who before the war may have worked as a servant at the London County Lunatic Asylum, Hanwell.  The newly commissioned 2/Lt Burton joined 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 4 Mar 1917 and was posted at some point to 58 Bde, because on 6 Aug 1917 he returned to 11 DAC from the brigade.  He must have returned to 58 Bde at some point after that because on 11 Oct 1917 he reported sick from the A/58 and was sent to 63 Casualty Clearing Station with “general debility” after having spent 3 days and nights in a shell hole supporting the infantry, which his battery commander did not regard as “exceptional exposure”, instead commenting that he had “always had a nervous affliction of the eyes”.  From the clearing station he went to 1/2 South Midland Field Ambulance suffering from headaches, pains in his shins and a lack of sleep and was evacuated to England on 8 Nov 1917.  He joined D Battery No.6 Reserve Bde RFA T, Biscot Camp, Luton, on 14 Feb 1918 and was promoted to Lt on 26 Aug 1918.  After the war he served in 142 Battery, 36 Bde at Kildare, Ireland, from where he decided to retire on retirement pay from the Army, on 8 Jan 1920 and joined the Reserve of Officers.  However, he then briefly joined No.4 Depot at Woolwich for duty on 13 Apr 1921 and worked there until he was “relegated to unemployment” on 7 Jun 1921.   In 1923 he sought permission from the War Office to emigrate to Australia, which was granted on 27 Aug 1923 by another former 58 Bde officer, Maj T J Hutton, now serving in the Personnel Services directorate.  His wife Rose died in Perth, Australia in 1930, aged 42.  He may have married for a third time, because on 4 Aug 1936 he issued a notice in the “Western Australian” newspaper to say that from that date he would not accept responsibility for any further debts of his wife, F E Burton. 
Gnr.
Calcott   
John William
137952
B/58
Son of Richard and Sarah Calcott of Stourport, Worcs.   John William Calcott was known as Jack to his family and friends.  He was born in Cardiff in about 1894.  In 1911 he was a tin plate worker in Upper Mitton, Stourport-on-Severn, Worcs.   He worked at the Dunlop rubber works in Birmingham, having previously worked at Baldwins.  He enlisted on 24th May 1916, and at the time of his death he resided with his wife and child at 44 Manor Road, Stourport.  He died on 7 Nov 1918 just 4 days before the Armistice, having been in France for just over two years. He is buried in London Cemetery and Extension, Longueval, France.  He was posthumously awarded the Military Medal.  His only brother, Richard, had been killed a year earlier.  
Sgt.
Cameron  
Robert Ramsey
93125
A/58
Robert Ramsey Cameron was born in Dunbartonshire. He enlisted in Clydebank, Lanarkshire, shortly after war broke out. He was assigned to A/58 and had been promoted to Bdr by 17 Feb 1915 and had been promoted again to Cpl when on 4 Apr 1915 he witnessed offences by three men in the battery, Gnr Whitehouse (10652), Gnr Stratton (80791) and Dvr Birch (11284), during their training in Leeds. He was awarded the Military Medal on 20 Nov 1916 for swift action he and Lt Peel took when an enemy shell hit No.4 gun emplacement on 24 Oct 1916. The citation for his medal said: “Battery was being shelled and a 5.9″ hit a gun emplacement, wounding some of the detachment and burying the rest. Lt Peel and Sgt Cameron immediately rushed out and dug the buried men out, thereby saving their lives”. Eight men were badly burned by the explosion and one killed. He was still serving in A/58 when he was killed in action on 15 Sep 1917, and is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.
2/Lt.
Cameron   
Aylmer Lochiel
n/a
B/58
Aylmer Lochiel Cameron was born on 2 Nov 1895 in India to Ewan Duncan Cameron & Lelitia Emily Catherine Cameron (née Hight). In 1901 he was 5 years old and living with his 3 elder siblings at his grandparents’ house in Dover. His grandfather, Charles Hight, had been an officer in the Indian Army. Aylmer went to Wellington College. He was commissioned on 8 Aug 1914 into the Indian Army but was transferred to the artillery on 16 Mar 1915. He sailed from Liverpool on the “Empress Britain” on 1 July 1915 for Alexandria with 58 Bde and served in B/58 at Gallipoli. He was described by 2/Lt Robert Bragg as an “awfully nice fellow”. He was appointed as the Adjutant of the brigade on 6 Mar 1916 and so was promoted to be a temporary Lt, and was described by Maj Hutton that summer as nice, if a little young for the job. He went on 10 days’ leave on 24 Nov 1916, returning on 7 Dec 1916, and was awarded the Military Cross in the 1917 New Year’s Honours. He went for a few days rest to Paris with Maj Hutton on 23 Mar 17, returning on 26 Mar 17, and was wounded on 8 Apr 1917, but returned to the unit ten days later, 18 Apr 1917. He had 10 days’ leave from 25 May to 5 Jun 1917. He was promoted to be an acting Captain on 3 Jul 1917. On 4 Oct 1917 he acted as liaison officer with 34 Inf Bde. Capt Cameron returned from attending the Overseas Artillery Course on 8 Jan 1918. He was acting battery commander in late April 1918 when Maj Hutton returned and he was sent to 1 Corps Officers’ Rest Station on 11 May 1918 and was Mentioned in Dispatches on 24 May 1918. He took over command of B/58 on 4 Jul 1918 when Maj Hutton became Brigade Major of 34 Inf Bde, and was made an acting Major. Maj Cameron went on 14 days’ leave to England, on 12 Sep 1918, not returning until 30 Sep 1918 owing to a railway strike. After the Armistice he went for a week’s attachment to 32 Inf Bde in connection with VIII Corps Military Training Scheme, between 11 and 17 Dec 1918. He attended a course in the UK, returning on 13 Feb 1919. He left 58 Bde on 21 Mar 1919 when he was selected for an appointment in the RHA. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the King’s Birthday Honours, 1919, and had been twice Mentioned in Dispatches during the war. He joined the School of Equitation in 1925, finishing as Chief Instructor in 1937. He retired from the Army in 1938. He married Lowis Mary Maitland Rugge-Price (a baronet’s daughter) on 20 Sep 1932 in Wimborne, Dorset. She was 15 years younger than him. They sailed from Southampton to Port Said, Egypt, on board the “Johan van Oldenbarneveldt” on 6 Oct 1933, and they were living at Beaucroft, Wimborne, at the time. They had one son who followed his father into the Army and became a Brigadier. He and his wife spent their final years living in The Old Rectory, Anderson, Blandford Forum, Dorset. He died on 2 May 1982 aged 86, and was buried in Winterborne-Zelstone, His wife died aged 78 in 1990.
2/Lt.
Campbell
E M
n/a
B/58
2/Lt E M Campbell MC was serving as an officer in B/58 when he went to the hospital sick on 11 Oct 1917.  
Cpl S/S
Campbell
John
6930
A/58
John Campbell was born in Dudley and enlisted in Ashington, Northumberland.  He was married to Mary Ellen Campbell and their home was in Ashington.  He was killed in action on 16 or 17 Feb 1918, aged 27, and he is buried in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France.
Gnr.
Campbell
John
134414
D/58
Born in 1889, John Campbell’s trade was horse shoeing.  He enlisted in his home town, Glasgow, on 2 Sep 1914, aged 20 and was posted to initially to No.6 Depot, Glasgow.  From there he was posted to 73 Bde Ammunition Column on 6 Nov 1914 as a driver, then to 228 Bty on 30 Dec 1914, which became C/72.  Making use of his civilian occupation, he was appointed a Shoeing-Smith on 8 Jan 1915.  He was promoted to Cpl Shoeing-Smith on 7 Jun 1915 while still in C/72 and went to France on 9 July 1915.  At some point in the war he suffered a contused and fractured pelvis – this may have been the cause for him being posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 28 Sep 1915.  He was then posted to 29 Division Ammunition Column which was serving in Egypt, arriving there on about 21 Nov 1915.  While still in Egypt, on 10 Apr 1916, he was posted to A/58, with whom he stayed for the rest of the war.  He was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field, this was gazetted on 28 Jan 1918.  He was demobbed on 31 Mar 1920.
2/Lt.
Campbell
R G
n/a
A/58
2/Lt R G Campbell was attached to A/58 from RA HQ on 12 Mar 1917.  He was posted from the brigade to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 25 Jun 1917 but posted back to 58 Bde four days later on 29th.  He was wounded in the neck by a shell on 21 Aug 1917 and evacuated.  
2/Lt.
Campsie
Robert William
n/a
D/58
Son of Robert and Elizabeth Campsie, Robert William Campsie was born on 15 Jan 1893 in Islington, London.  He joined Springfield School in Lambeth on 24 Aug 1896, aged just 3 and a half.  Before the war he worked as a tailor’s shopman.  He was commissioned as 2/Lt on probation on 28 Jul 1916 having been an officer cadet.  He went to France on 5 Aug 1916 and joined D/58 on 18 Jun 1917.    Due to ill health contracted while on active service in the RFA, he retired from the Army on 13 Feb 1918.  In 1921 he was working as an assistant trader when he arrived back in the UK after a trip to Nigeria.  Also that year he was cited in a divorce case as having had an affair with Lady Grace Brisco.  A Robert W Campsie died in Yorkshire in 1957, aged 64.  
Dvr.
Carpenter
Richard George
10709
A/58
Richard George Carpenter was born in Coventry on 6 Jan 1889.  Before the war he worked as an iron moulder.  He enlisted in Nuneaton on 3 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.   From there he was posted to 184 Bty on 4 Sep 1914, which became A/58.  He was wounded by shrapnel in his left hip on 12 Aug 1915, very soon after he had landed at Gallipoli.  He was evacuated from there on Hospital Ship “Sicilia” and admitted to 15 General Hospital, Alexandria.  From there, he sailed on Hospital Ship “Asturias” on 15 Sep 1915 from Alexandria to go back to the UK where he was assigned to 5C Reserve Bde during his convalescence in hospital.  He stayed in Cambridge Hospital, Aldershot from 25 Sep 1915 to 1 Apr 1916.  After his wounding he suffered a nervous breakdown and stomach problems.  He did not return to active service, instead he was released for munition work at The Rover Motor Co Ltd, Garfield Rd, Coventry on 19 Apr 1916, so was able to live at home.  The company wrote to the War Office requesting that an extra ration allowance be granted since he was living at home.  The request was denied.   He died in Coventry on 11 Oct 1974, aged 85.
Sgt.
Carruthers
   
B/58
The adjutant of 58th Bde mentions a Sgt Carruthers in B/58 as being eminently qualified to act as BQMS and says that 3 successive battery commanders have put him forward to be so but he was passed over each time because he is too far down the seniority list (by about 300 places).  The adjutant asked, in exasperation: “Is this helping towards efficiency?”
Capt.
Cartmel-Robinson
Harold Francis
n/a
HQ
Harold Francis Cartmel-Robinson was born on 28 March 1889.   His father, Jacob, was a vicar, living in Stoke Newington.  Harold attended St Paul’s School Kensington and Merton College Oxford before taking up a post as an Assistant Native Commissioner and Justice of the Peace in Northern Rhodesia [Zambia] in September 1912.  He joined the Northern Rhodesia Rifles on 25 Mar 1915.  He left Northern Rhodesia in about November 1916 to return to the UK and joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps on 28 Feb 1917.  He married Beatrice Elizabeth Whittle in 1917, and applied for a commission, being ordered to report to the Royal Artillery Officer Cadet School, St John’s Wood, London, on 7 Jun 1917. He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA (Special Reserve) on 3 Nov 1917 and first arrived in France at Le Havre on 4 Jan 1918.  He joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from the Base on 10 Jan 1918 and was posted to the Headquarters of 58 Bde on 27 Jan 1918 where he would have met up with his brother-in-law, Maj J H Baines.  (Maj Baines having married Harold’s younger sister, Gladys Ada, in 1912).  After 10 men of D/58 were killed by a German bomber while trying to free a wagon from a ditch, he twice set a trap for enemy aeroplanes on 23 and 26 Aug 1918 in the hope of exacting revenge, but without success.  While serving in 58 Bde HQ, he signed a number of orders in the place of the adjutant in May and Sept 1918 and went on 14 days’ leave to England on 9 Sep 1918 though didn’t return until 26 Sep 1918.  He was appointed Adjutant on Armistice Day, replacing Capt T F Monks, and was appointed A/Capt.  On 16 Nov 1918 he was admitted to 57 Casualty Clearing Station with influenza, was transferred to No.20 General Hospital and was then evacuated to the UK on 25 Nov 1918 on the AT “Stad Antwerpen”, though the brigade only found that out on 5 Dec 1918.   He attended a Medical Board at the Queen Alexandra’s Military Hospital Millbank on 28 Jan 1919 which recommended him for demobilisation.  He relinquished the rank of A/Capt on 27 Apr 1919 on ceasing to be adjutant and relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920.  He returned to Northern Rhodesia after the war and sailed for South Africa from Southampton on the “Kenilworth Castle” on 1 Sep 1922 with his wife and 1-year old daughter.  He was awarded an OBE in the King’s Birthday Honours in 1933 while working as a District Commissioner in Northern Rhodesia, and a CMG in the 1942 Birthday Honours while working as Provincial Governor there.  Sir H F Cartmel-Robinson died on 18 Nov 1957, aged 68.  
2/Lt.
Castle
Arthur
n/a
A/58
Born on 25 Feb 1897, Arthur Castle attended St Paul’s School and Deal School, Deal, Kent.  In 1915 he was aged 18 and was living in Ealing and working as a clerk in the London County and Westminster Bank when he resigned to join the Army.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA Special Reserve on 16 Nov 1915 and was posted to France on 3 Feb 1916 where he served in 133 Bde RFA.  Presumably on 29 Nov 1916 he joined 58 Bde when the centre section of A/133 was transferred to A/58 to make it into a 6-gun battery.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 2 Dec 1916., but returned a few days later on 12 Dec 1916 and was assigned to A/58.  He was posted back to 11 DAC for a few more days between 27 and 31 Jan 1917, rejoining A/58 afterwards.  He was granted leave, returning on 16 Feb 1917 and must have been wounded or been taken ill because he attended a Medical Board at Lezarde Valley Camp, Le Havre, on 5 Jun 1917 where he was declared fit for service.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917 and during a major barrage by the battery on 31 Jul 1917 he achieved the feat of sleeping through it all.  On 16 Aug 1917 he was acting as Forward Observation Officer during the first day of the British attack of the Battle of Langemarck.  As he advanced, he was wounded in the back, right leg and left forearm from the British artillery barrage.  He was sent to hospital where the wound was found to be serious, so he left 58 Bde (“a great loss” according to his battery commander) and was evacuated from Calais to Dover on 19 Aug 1917.  After leave granted by a Medical Board for recuperation, he was passed fit by a Medical Board held at 1/5th Northern General Hospital, Leicester on 18 Jan 1918 so was ordered to report to AG6 at the War Office on 8 Feb 1918 ready for being posted back overseas.  He rejoined A/58 on 16 May 1918 and was sent on an artillery course at 1 Corps School on 17 Aug 1918.  He was one of the officers who formed part of a mobile battery on 26 Aug 1918 as the German Army began its final collapse and retreat.  He returned from more leave on 15 Dec 1918, and attended a course at 1st Army Artillery School, rejoining his battery on 28 Jan 1919.  He left 58 Bde on 10 Mar 1919 on being posted to 49 Divisional Artillery where he served in 245 Bde RFA as part of the Rhine Army occupying Germany.  He was demobilised on 9 Nov 1919 at No.1 Dispersal Unit, Ripon and relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920.  As tensions with Germany and the possibility of another war loomed, he joined the Territorial Army to serve in the ranks of 60th (City of London) Anti-Aircraft Bde on 11 Apr 1938.  He was allotted service number 1427878 and while serving in the ranks had to relinquish his rank of Lt.  
Dvr.
Caton
John
229173
C/58
John Caton was born in in about 1884 in Cherry Tree, Blackburn, Lancs.  Before the war he and his wife Catherine and their daughter lived in Audley, Blackburn, where they both worked in the textiles industry: John as a Heald examiner, while Catherine was a Heald knitter.   John was killed in action alongside two other members of C/58, Leslie Savage and Joseph Petty, on 20 June 1918.   John was 34.  All three are buried alongside each other in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe.
Gnr.
Cator
Herbert John
235138
D/58
Herbert John Cator was baptised on 18 Oct 1885.  He was the son of Charles and Caroline Cator of Ashill, Norfolk.  Before the war he had married Jane and was a waggoner on a farm in Ashill.  On 23 Aug 1918 he was one of a party of men from D/58 who were helping get a wagon out of a ditch when an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on the party.  Nine were killed, one later dying of wound.  He is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, France.  
Gnr.
Caunt
George
18997
 
George Caunt enlisted on 6 Sep 1914.  He went overseas, arriving in the Balkans theatre of war on 13 Oct 1915.  While serving with 58 Bde, he was discharged from the Army on 12 Sep 1918 due to wounds he had received and he was awarded a Silver War Badge.
BSM
Cavill
W
51106
B/58
Battery Sergeant Major W Cavill was the senior NCO of 185 Battery in the early months of the brigade’s training.  He made the following report about an accident that happened during training: “On the afternoon of the 9th Nov 1914, I was superintending the driving drill of the battery.  Sergeant Cornford was in charge and was moving in battery column and was wheeling to the right.  The team of which Dr. Chaplin was lead driver got out of hand, wheeled to the left down a slope and during the plunging of the horses Driver Chaplin came off and was dragged by his left foot in the stirrup for a considerable distance.  His foot then became free and he fell under the wheels.  He was picked up and taken to hospital.”  
Gnr.
Chambers
Ernest
11019
D/58
Ernest Chambers was the son of Ernest and Kate Chambers.  They lived in Church Lawford, Rugby, Warks.  He enlisted early in the war and was assigned to D/58.  He was wounded while serving at Gallipoli and died of his wounds on 7 Oct 1915, aged 19.  He was buried at sea.  He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial and on the Brandon village memorial, near Rugby.  
Dvr.
Chaplin
Frederick
11143
B/58
Frederick Chaplin was born in Bristol in 1893.   On 3 Sep 1914, he was a 21-year old milkman living at 22 Lansdowne Rd, Redland, Bristol, when he enlisted in Bristol.  He was 5’3″ tall with dark brown hair, blue eyes and a fresh complexion according to examination at the Colston Hall by a civilian doctor, E H C Pauli.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, then to 185 Bty.   On the afternoon of 9 Nov 1914, he was training as lead driver in driving drill on Sugarwell Hill, Meanwood, NE Leeds, when his team of horses got out of hand.  They went down a slope and during the plunging of the horses Fred Chaplin came off and was dragged by his left foot in the stirrup for a considerable distance.  His foot then became free and he fell under the wheels.  He was picked up and taken to Leeds Infirmary, where he was diagnosed with a fractured skull and dislocated shoulder.   He was in the infirmary between 10 Nov and 6 Dec 1914.  A Board of Enquiry was held on 18 Nov 1914 which exonerated him of any blame.   He married Eva Mildred House on 13 Mar 1915 at the Registry Office, Bristol, and was absent from 7 am reveille three days later on 16 Mar 1915 at Leeds and was absent for 2 days, for which he was awarded to be confined to barracks for 14 days by Maj Meyricke and forfeited 2 days’ pay.  He was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 17 Apr 1915.   His daughter Peggy Mildred was born 6 months after his wedding on 3 Sep 1915.  He was awarded 7 more days’ confinement to barracks on 7 May 1915 while at Milford Camp by Capt Marsden for hesitating to obey an order.  He was posted to 19th (R) Bty on 3 Nov 1915, then to the Expeditionary Force Base Depot on 22 Nov 1915, and to 40th Bde Ammunition Column on 26 Nov 1915.  He was posted on reorganisation to No.2 section, 3 Division Ammunition Column on 13 May 1916.  He went to 8 Field Ambulance with influenza on 27 Jun 1916, returning to duty a couple of days later.  He had leave to UK between 19 and 29 Jul 1917 and was then posted to C/40 Bde on 10 Sep 1917.  He had another spell of leave to the UK between 8 and 22 Mar 1918.  After the war ended, he was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Fovant on 25 Apr 1919, transferred to Section B Army Reserve on 23 May 1919, and discharged on demobilisation on 31 Mar 1920.   He expressed an interest in joining Section D Army Reserve after the war.  He died in Weston-super-Mare in 1965, aged 72.  
Bdr.
Chapman
George Henry
48154
B/58
George Henry Chapman was a pre-war regular soldier and was serving as a gunner in 29 Bde when he was sent to France as part of the original BEF on 23 Aug 1914.  On 7 Jul 1918 he was serving with B/58 as a Bdr when he was promoted to Cpl.  He ended the war as a Sgt and was still serving in the Army in 1920 as a paid acting Sgt when he was registered as an absent voter for Hammersmith & Fulham to enable him to vote by proxy or by post.
Dvr.
Chesterton
James William
23302
 
James William Chesterton was born in 1896 in Gilmorton, Leics.  He enlisted on 26 Apr 1915, aged 19.  He was discharged from the Army while serving in 58th Bde on 21 Nov 1918 due to wounds he had received.  He married Dorothea May Sharpe in Dec 1919 and they had 4 children.  He died on 4 Apr 1960, aged 64.
A/Bdr.
Chorley
William James
10581
C/58
Born on 14 Jan 1895, William James Chorley was a groom from Curry Rivel, Somerset.  He enlisted in Taunton on 2 Sep 1914, aged 19.  After going first to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, he was posted to 186 Bty on 10 Sep 1914, which became C/58.  He was appointed Acting Bdr on 8 Feb 1915.  He embarked on the SS “Knight Templar” at Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915 and landed at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.   He was appointed Temporary Bdr on 24 Sep 1915.  He caught jaundice and so was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance on Gallipoli on 31 Oct 1915, though was discharged back to duty on 2 Nov 1915. Shortly after, he was appointed A/Cpl on 6 Nov 1915.  Shortly after leaving Gallipoli he was re-admitted to hospital in Egypt on 4 Jan 1916 with albuminosis so was transferred to Nasareth School Cairo next day.  He embarked on Hospital Ship “Valdiva” to be returned to the UK for treatment on 24 Mar 1916 and was put on the invalid list.  He was posted to 5C Reserve Brigade on 5 Apr 1916, then to 20 Reserve Bty on 4 Jul 1916, and then sent back overseas to join A/57 which was serving with 10th (Irish) Division on the Salonika front.  He was admitted to 43 General Hospital Salonika on 26 Sep 1916 and evacuated on Hospital Ship Llandovery Castle to Malta in October 1916.  He was promoted to Sgt on 10 Mar 1918 and was demobbed on 15 May 1919.  After his return to civilian life, he got a job 4 weeks later as a porter with Great Western Railways on 16 Jun 1919 at Cardiff Railway Station.   He stayed working for GWR until at least 1931.  He married Ethel Worthy in 1919.  
Cpl.
Clark
George
54164
HQ
A pre-war regular soldier, George Clark had been a shuttlemaker in Dundee before he joined the Army in Dundee on 7 Jan 1909, joining at Seaforth 4 days later.  He qualified as a signaller and telephonist.  He was appointed A/Bdr with 135 Bty on 1 Aug 1913, reverting to gunner on 13 Oct 1913 due to misconduct: he had been absent from duty while in charge of a hospital guard.  His commanding officer in 135 Bty described him as “A good signaller.  Accustomed to the care of horses.  A keen & cheerful worker.”  He was again appointed A/Bdr on 4 Jul 1914.  His battery was part of 32nd Bde RFA in 4th Division.  He went with them to France on 23 Aug 1914.  He was wounded on 18 Sep 1914, with shrapnel in his left buttock so was evacuated back to the UK and stayed in London General Hospital, Denmark Hill, between 27 Sep and 29 Oct 1914.  He was posted to 4B Res Bde on 25 Jan 1915, and then was posted to join the HQ of 118 (Howitzer) Bde on 1 Mar 1915 and was promoted to Bdr the same day.  He left the UK to join his new unit, landing at Le Havre on 11 Mar 1915.  He was promoted to Cpl on 30 Dec 1915. On 15 Jul 1916, he was posted to No.2 Camp, Sanvic, Le Havre, and from there was assigned to 58th Bde HQ on 27 Jul 1916.  He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal in the New Year’s Honours, 1917, “For conspicuous gallantry in action.  He remained at his post continuously for three days and nights, in order to maintain a complicated system of signal communication. He set a fine example throughout.”  He was granted leave to UK between 19 and 28 Jan 1917.  On 7 Jun 1917, he was severely wounded in action with gunshot wounds (probably actually shrapnel) in his right hip and thigh.  He was admitted to 113 Field Ambulance the same day and died of his wounds on 14 Jun 1917 in 14th General Hospital, Boulogne.  He is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.  The Ministry of Pensions granted his widow a pension of 27 shillings and 6d a week from 24 Dec 1917. He and his wife, Cissie Kitchener had had three children, including a son, George Augustus Kitchener born in 1913 before they were married, a daughter Alice Clark born on 15 Jul 1914, a month after they were married, and a third, name and date unknown.  They lived in Woolwich.  In July 1918, Cissie Clark asked that her late husband’s DCM be posted to her rather than have it awarded publicly.    
Cpl.
Clark
Joseph
6395
 
Joseph Clark enlisted on 28 Aug 1914.  On 18 Sep 1919 while serving in 58th Bde, he was discharged from the Army as being “surplus to military requirements having suffered impairment since entry into the service” and so was awarded a Silver War Badge.
Gnr.
Clark
Leonard Frank
945474
B/58
Leonard Frank Clark was a young draughtsman working in the Royal Arsenal Woolwich when he enlisted there on 19 Aug 1914 into the Territorial Force aged just 17 years and 4 months.  He was posted to France on 22 Jan 1917 and was there until 5 Mar 1917.  He returned to the UK, presumably due to illness or wounds, and stayed in the UK until 16 Oct 1917 when he returned to France where he was posted to B/58.  He suffered gas poisoning and was invalided home from France on 5 Jul 1918 and admitted to hospital.  He was discharged from the Army while in hospital on 1 Aug 1918 and was awarded an Army pension until his death 2 years later on 30 Jun 1920 from tuberculosis.  He is buried in Wimbledon (Gap Road) Cemetery.  His father applied for a commemorative plaque (sometimes known as the Death Penny) and scroll on 4 Oct 1920 to demonstrate that he had died as a result of his war service.  This was approved just three days later. 
Gnr.
Clarke
Oliver
11258
58 Bde AC
A carter from Acton Turville, Glos, Oliver Clarke enlisted aged 21 on 5 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there he was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Sep 1914. and from there to the new D/58 on 21 Jan 1915.  He badly wounded his hand while training so was in Leeds Infirmary from 8 Feb to 26 Mar 1915.  He sailed from Devonport with his battery on 3 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  He sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  After the evacuation of the division from Gallipoli, he arrived back in Alexandria on 17 Jan 1916.  Along with the rest of D/58 he was posted to A battery of the new 11 Division Howitzer Bde on its formation, on 26 Apr 1916, which became 133 Bde.  When that unit was broken up, he was posted to B/58 on 4 Dec 1916.   He was gassed on 9 Apr 1918, so having left 58th Bde and after a period of recuperation in 56, 73 and 74 General Hospitals he was sent to the Base depot on 8 Jun 1918 and posted to A/251 on 17 Jun 1918.  He was wounded again on 27 Sep 1918 with a gunshot wound to his knee.  Again, after recuperation in the South African General Hospital Abbeville, he again went to the Base Depot on 30 Nov 1918, and was sent to the Dispersal Centre Fovant for demobilisation on 26 Jan 1919.  
Sgt.
Clarke
William
50462
D/58
While training with D/58 at Milford Camp, Surrey, Sgt William Clarke contracted acute laryngitis, from which he died in Milford on 5 May 1915.   He is buried in Godalming New Cemetery.
Gnr.
Clarke
   
HQ
Gnr Clarke of HQ 58th Bde passed as a 1st class signaller by XIII Corps School on 22 Mar 1917.
Sgt.
Clarke
   
A/58?
On 20 Jul 1915, a Sgt Clarke witnessed Gnr McGuire (93021) being drunk and his “conduct to the prejudice of military discipline” at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria.  
Bdr.
Clarke
   
A/58
Bdr Clarke was serving as a signaller in A/58 when he was wounded on about 26 Sep 1916 during the Battle of Thiepval.  
A/Sgt.
Clarke  
George H 
44408
C/58
Gnr George H Clarke was a pre-war regular soldier and so went to France as part of the BEF on 16 Aug 1914 while serving with 48 Bde.  By 15 May 1917, he had been promoted to Sgt and was serving in C/58, when he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He extinguished two fires in the gunpits of the battery.  The pits were full of ammunition, and were being heavily shelled.  His gallant action saved many lives, and probably all the guns of the battery.”  He was promoted subsequently to BQMS, the rank he was serving in at the end of the war.
Bdr.
Clarkson   
Philip 
50858
B/58
A pre-war regular soldier, Philip Clarkson was serving with 32 Bde RFA when he went to France on 23 Aug 1914 as part of the BEF.  By mid-1917 he had been promoted to Bdr and joined B/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 22 Jul 1917.
Dvr.
Clements
Frank
112768
B/58
Frank Clements was born on 14 Dec 1892, the son of Charles and Ellen Clements of Liverpool.  Before the war he worked as a labourer.  He enlisted in Liverpool.  He was serving in B/58 when he was killed on 28 May 1917 and was buried in Loker Churchyard Cemetery, Flanders, Belgium
 
Clough
C
 
C/58
C Clough served in C/58 at some point during the war.  In later life, while serving together in the Home Guard in Nantwich, Cheshire, during World War 2, he befriended another former member of the brigade, Bernard Shackleton.
Cpl.
Cole
   
B/58?
Cpl Cole was a witness to an improper reply made by Gnr Baron (148993) of B/58 to an NCO on 18 Jan 1918.
Dvr.
Coleman
Leonard  
64902
C/58
Leonard Coleman was born in about 1896 in Aston, Birmingham, the son of Charles Joseph and Charlotte Coleman.  He was working as a blacksmith when he enlisted in Birmingham on 13 Jan 1915, aged 19.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 106 Bde Ammunition Column (BAC) where he was appointed a shoeing-smith on 30 Jun 1915.  On 29 Aug 1915 he went to France.  He was in hospital between 24 Dec 1915 and 8 Jan 1916 due to inflammation of connecting tissue.  He missed a 6.30am parade and as punishment he reverted to being a driver on 10 Apr 1916 and a few days later, on 21 Apr 16 he again missed morning parade so was awarded 7 days’ Field Punishment No.1.  He was admitted to 72 Field Ambulance with an abscess on his neck on 13 May 1916.  On 13 May 1916, 106 BAC became 24 Division Ammunition Column (DAC).  He was posted to 11 DAC on 20 Jul 1916 and was awarded 3 days’ Field Punishment No.2 on 19 Nov 1916 for neglect of duty.  On 4 Jan 1917, he was awarded a further 4 days’ Field Punishment No.2 for not complying with an order.  On 24 Apr 1917 he was posted to C/58.  Six months later, he was killed in action on 9 Oct 1917 aged 20 and is buried in Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Belgium.
Gnr.
Coling
Harry 
45119
D/58
Harry Coling was the son of John and Jane Coling of Normanton, West Yorks.  He was born in 1896 in Normanton and baptised on 10 May that year.  In 1911 he was working as an errand boy for a pawn shop.  He enlisted into the Army early in the war in Normanton and was first posted overseas on 18 Apr 1915 when he went to France.  While serving with D/58, he was killed in action on 23 May 1918.  He is buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery.
 
Collins
A
   
A Collins was serving in 58 Bde near Arras when he was court-martialled on 7 Apr 1917.
 
Collins
     
While 58th Bde was fighting at Gallipoli, Collins had been due to report to Suvla Bay on 26 Oct 1915, but he was sick so an unnamed BQMS was sent in his stead.
Capt.
Colson
George Henry
n/a
B/58
Born on 30 Apr 1878, George Henry Colson was a career soldier.  He married Ella Mary Craig on 17 Aug 1903 in Bangalore, India.  In 1911 he was serving as a BQMS in P Battery, Royal Horse Artillery in India.  He went to France on 7 Nov 1914 as a Sgt Maj in the HQ of Asquith’s Bde, RHA, but was commissioned as 2/Lt shortly afterwards on 17 Dec 1914.  On 24 Apr 1915 he was made a temporary Capt while training artillerymen at a depot, but he was promoted to Lt on 23 Jul 1916.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column from the Base depot on 9 Jan 1918, and was then posted from there to B/58.  He assumed the duties of 58th Bde’s adjutant on 6 Mar 1918, but a month later he assumed command of C/58 on 9 Apr 1918 after so many officers had become gas casualties.  In his turn he too had to go to wagon lines suffering from gas on 18 Apr 1918.  He acted as the liaison officer with an infantry battalion of 32 Inf Bde for a raid they undertook on 9 May 1918.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches on 24 May 1918 but was struck off 58th Bde’s strength due to being found unfit for duty at the front on 4 Jul 1918.  However, two weeks later on 17 Jul 1918, he was appointed to be the adjutant of an unspecified artillery unit and on 5 Mar 1919 he was again appointed as an adjutant.   He relinquished the role of adjutant on 14 Dec 1919, and he retired from the Army on 20 Mar 1920.   He died in Vancouver, Canada on 1 Feb 1967, aged 88.  
Lt.
Constable
John Hugh
n/a
 
Lt John Hugh Constable was born on 27 Feb 1896 in Carlow, Ireland.  He was the great-grandson of the artist John Constable, and he went to Clifton College.  He attended the Royal Military Academy and was commissioned on 10 Feb 1915.  He was serving in 14 Division Artillery when he went to France in May 1915.  He was promoted to Lt on 8 Aug 1916.  He joined 58th Bde from 11 Division Ammunition Column on 27 Sep 1917.  He went on leave on 24 Dec 1917, returning on 9 Jan 1918.  He attended a veterinary course between 15 and 25 Jan 1918.  He was appointed Cl HH.  He stayed on in the Army after the war, serving with 6th Bde, RFA.  In 1920 and 1921 he served in Germany as a member of the Allied Control Commission and he married Eileen Saltmarsh on 25 Mar 1927.  He served in both World Wars, becoming a Lieutenant Colonel.  He retired from the Army in 1947 and settled at The Old Rectory, Kettleburgh, Suffolk, and died in 1974 in Blyth, Suffolk
Gnr.
Cooper
William Thomas Henry 
11164
B/58
William Thomas Henry Cooper was a 21 year old machine driller from Easton, near Bristol, when he enlisted in Bristol on 4 Sep 1914.  After being posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, he was posted to 185 Bty on 10 Sep 1914, which became B/58.  He sailed from Devonport on 1 Jul 1914, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 14, and then from Alexandria he sailed on 28 Jul 1914, landing at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1914.  He was admitted to 2 Australian Hospital on Mudros on 2 Oct 1915 with diarrhoea and urinary trouble.  He returned to the UK on Hospital Ship “Aquitania”, which sailed on 18 Oct 1915, arriving back in the UK on 26 Oct 1915, and he was admitted to the Military Hospital Winchester with dysentery.  He remained in the UK for the rest of war, though was hospitalised at least twice more: in Newcastle-upon-Tyne with tonsillitis on 26 Oct 1916 and in the Military Hospital Cambridge with syphilis between 6 Jun and 22 Aug 1918.   He was assigned to 5C Reserve Bde on 27 Nov 15, at later to 71 Division Artillery, which was a home service division.  On 5 May 1917, he and Elsie Roberts were married.  He was posted to 415 Bty on 5 Mar 1918 and sent to the Dispersal Centre at Chiseldon for demobilisation on 22 Apr 1919.
Gnr.
Copeland
 
99543
 
Gunner Copeland was promoted to acting Cpl on 30 Sep 1915.
Sgt.
Copland
George
84264
C/58
George Copland served as an NCO in C/58 while the battery was training in the UK.  On 8 Mar 1915 he was a Bdr when he witnessed Gnr Sidney Edwards (11256) missing a roll call, and 8 Mar 15.  By mid-May he had been promoted to Sgt when he witnessed Cpl Percy Beale (10579) neglect duty on 15 May 1915, and the same day he reported Gnr Harry Beesley (10674) for having overstayed his leave.  He in turn ran into trouble when he was court-martialled on 24 Jun 1915 while at Milford Camp.  
Gnr.
Cordery
Frederick
58079
B/58
Frederick Cordery was a gunner before the war serving in 72nd Battery in Bulford Camp in 1911.   He had been born in Cholsey near Wallingford, which was then in Berkshire (but since 1974 is now in Oxfordshire).  He enlisted in Benson and was married to Elizabeth Taylor Cordery when he was posted out to Egypt on 27 Nov 1915.  He died of wounds aged 27 on 18 Jan 1916 in the Military Hospital Cairo.  He is buried in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery.
2/Lt.
Cork
Stephen
n/a
 
Born in Rochester, Kent, in about 1877, Stephen Cork was a labourer who enlisted into the RFA in 1895 aged 18 (service number 9661) for a period of 7 years with the colours and a further 5 in the reserves.  He subsequently extended that first to 12 years with the colours and then to 21 years.  He rose through the ranks to become a Sgt Major on 29 Jan 1914 but was discharged as physically unfit for military service due to piles on 11 May 1915.  During his service he married Ellen Murray on 1 Dec 1900 in Fermoy and they had 6 children, two of whom died in infancy.  He served in India between 1906 and 1912 and was awarded the Long Service with Good Conduct medal.  He re-enlisted on 7 Jun 1915 in West Hartlepool, where he and his family had now settled, just a month after having had an operation to cure his piles and was appointed as Regimental Sgt Major of 176 Bde RFA (service number L/28834).  He arrived in France on 9 Jan 1916 and was assigned to 152 Bde on re-organisation on 28 Aug 1916.  He was posted briefly to 34 Division Ammunition Column on 6 Sep 1916 and then to 58 Bde on 1 Dec 1916.  He was granted leave to the UK between 27 Dec 1916 and 5 Jan 1917, and in January 1917 applied for a commission.  He was supported in his application by the acting commander of 58 Bde, Maj Griffin, and by the CRA of 11 Division, Brigadier General Lamont, who was keen to have him back in 58 Bde once he had been commissioned.  Stephen Cork therefore returned to the UK on 6 Feb 1917 to attend No.2 Officer Cadet School, Topsham Barracks, Exeter and was commissioned as 2/Lt on 9 Aug 1917, now giving his profession as horse trainer, and re-joined 58 Bde.  On 19 Feb 1919, he was promoted to Lt.  He was demobilised on 23 Mar 1920 at the Officers’ Dispersal Unit, London, and relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920.  
Sgt.
Cornford
David
8582
HQ
Sgt David Cornford was a pre-war soldier having enlisted on 23 Feb 1895.  He was in charge of training his battery’s driving teams on 9 Nov 1914 when one team got out of control and Dvr Fred Chaplin (11143) was injured.  Sgt Cornford provided a witness statement at the subsequent Board of Enquiry on 18 Nov 1914.   He was still serving with 58th Bde and was acting as the brigade’s RSM when he reported sick on 16 Sep 1916.  He was discharged from the Army on 12 Mar 1917, aged 43, from the Command Depot in Ripon having reached the end of his agreed period of service.   
Dvr.
Cornwell
Arthur Harold
211586
A/58
Arthur Harold Cornwell was a grocer from Saffron Walden, Essex.  He had married Alice Jones and they had had a daughter Joan Mary Isobel who was born on 10 Feb 1916.   He was conscripted on 9 Apr 1917 and called up for service the following day.  After postings to No.4 Depot and 4 Reserve Bde RFA(T), he was posted to France on 16 Jan 1918 and to A/58 on 27 Jan 1918.  He was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance on 4 Feb 1918 having fainted, returning to his unit on 14 Feb 1918, but then on 7 Apr 1918 he was admitted to a Casualty Clearing Station with epilepsy.  As a result, he was evacuated back to the UK two days later from 22 General Hospital and was admitted to Paisley War Hospital.  He had apparently suffered fits during childhood but these became more frequent while serving in France under regular shellfire.   He was discharged from the Army as being permanently unfit for military service aged 32 on 17 May 1918.  He died on 26 Nov 1951, aged 66.  
Bdr.
Cory
   
D/58
Bdr Cory was replaced by George Miller (65160) on 24 Jun 1917
Maj.
Cottrell    
Arthur Foulkes Baglietto 
n/a
OIC B/58
Arthur Foulkes Baglietto Cottrell was born on 4 Apr 1891 and was commissioned into the Royal Artillery on 20 Jul 1911. He was promoted to Lt on 20 Jul 1914 and after war was declared went to France with 54 Bty, 39 Bde, 1st Division on 18 Aug 1914.  He was Mentioned in Despatches on 17 Feb 1915.  He contracted flu at Festubert in early January 1915 so on 11 Jan 1915, he returned to the UK sailing from Boulogne to Dover on the SS “St David”.  He arrived in London on 15 Jan 1915 and contracted laryngitis as a result of the flu, so was awarded a month’s medical leave.   On 16 Mar 1915 he joined 60 Bde RFA and assumed the duties of their adjutant the next day.  He went before a medical board while at Witley Camp on 19 Apr 1915 which declared him fit for general service, so he sailed with 60 Bde from Devonport on 4 Jul 1915, arriving at Alexandria on 19 Jul 1915.  He left Alexandria on 18 Oct 1915, landing at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, on 25 Oct 1915.  During that journey he was appointed OIC B/60 on 21 Oct 1915 and granted the temporary rank of Captain.  He left Gallipoli on 20 Dec 1915 as the Army evacuated from there, arriving back at Alexandria on 29 Dec 1915.  After a period serving in the Egyptian Expeditionary Force defending the Suez Canal, during which he was appointed as Staff Captain RA for 11 Division on 8 May 1916, he embarked at Alexandria on 27 Jun 1916 bound for France.  He arrived in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  He was again Mentioned in Despatches on 12 Jul 1916 for distinguished and gallant service during the period of Gen Charles Munro’s command of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  He was granted leave to England on 20 Dec 1916, sailing from Boulogne to Folkestone, which was extended to 5 Jan 1917 on medical grounds, he having contracted laryngitis following flu again.  On 25 Jan 1917, as 60 Bde was being broken up, he was posted to command B/58 so was made a temporary Major while commanding a battery.  On 15 Feb 1917, the King of Serbia awarded him the Order of the White Eagle 5th Class with swords.  He went down to the wagon lines with Maj Hutton on 4 Mar 1917 for a couple of days away from the front line, and was admitted to No.1 British Red Cross Hospital with bronchitis on 16 Mar 1917 (so relinquished his rank of Major for commanding a battery the previous day) and was transferred back to the UK on Hospital Ship “Brighton” on 23 Mar 1917.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the King’s Birthday Honours on 5 Jun 1917, where he was described as “late B/58”.  He was again Mentioned in Despatches on 23 Jul 1917.  Towards the end of 1917 he was working at No.3 RFA Officer Cadet School, Weedon.  He acted as an adjutant with the Territorial Army between 29 Apr 1921 and 31 Oct 1924, the next day he was restored to the establishment, and between 30 Oct 1925 and 31 Oct 1928 he was an adjutant again before being promoted to Major on 25 Feb 1929.  On 9 Aug 1934 Maj Cottrell was appointed Inspector of the Artillery of the Iraqi Army as an O.S.O.2 with the British Military Mission attached to the Iraqi Army, a post he held until the end of 1937.  The King of Iraq awarded him the Insignia of the Fourth Class (Military Division) of the Order of Al Rafidain on 6 Dec 1937.  He was promoted to Lt. Col. on 1 Feb 1938 and awarded the OBE in the King’s Birthday Honours of 1938.  On 1 Mar 1941, while he was a temporary Brigadier, he was promoted from Lt Col to Col.  He and his wife, Mary Barbara Nicholl, had a son Donald William Foulkes Cottrell who was serving as Sgt in the RAFVR as an air gunner in a Baltimore of No. 55 Sqn flying out of Malta.  He was killed during a raid over Sicily on 25 Jul 1943.  A few weeks later, on 11 Sept 43, their daughter Anita got married.  Arthur Foulkes Baglietto Cottrell died in 1962.   
Gnr.
Cousins
   
HQ
Gunner Cousins passed as a 1st class signaller by XIII Corps school on 22 Mar 1917.
2/Lt.
Cox
Frank Ernest
n/a
C/58
Frank Ernest Cox was born on 19 Mar 1884 in Isleworth, London.  He was educated at Percy House, Isleworth and married Daisy Amanda Stanley on 11 Jan 1908.  He worked as a messenger before enlisting into the RFA in Camberwell on 23 Feb 1915 and was assigned service number L/6117. He was posted to A/156 Bde RFA and was rapidly promoted through the ranks to become Battery Quartermaster Sergeant on 6 Nov 1915.  On 11 Dec 1915 he sailed from Southampton, arriving in Le Havre the following day and was posted as BQMS to B/156 on 12 Sep 1916.  He applied for a commission and returned to the UK being posted initially to 50 Reserve Battery on 14 May 1917.  He was sent to the Royal Artillery Cadet School at Exeter on 14 Jul 1917, the commander of 33 Division Artillery noting that he had little knowledge of gunnery so should be thoroughly trained in this at the Cadet School.  He was commissioned into the RFA on 6 Jan 1918.  He arrived back in France at Boulogne on 23 Mar 1918 and was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 14 Apr 1918.  He was then posted to C/58 on 25 Apr 1918.  He went on leave on 19 Oct 1918, returning on 7 Nov 1918.  He assumed the role of 58 Bde Adjutant on 15 Nov 1918 and was formally appointed as adjutant with acting rank of Captain on 23 Dec 1918 “with effect from 25 Nov 1918”.   He went to the UK for demobilisation on 13 Feb 1919 and a report on his fitness for promotion by Lt Col Bedwell noted him as “not for higher rank”.  In probably 1921, he applied for a commission in the Militia. 
Cpl.
Craig
Frank McCartney
7252
D/58
Frank McCartney Craig was born in 1895, in Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire, son of Robert and Annie Craig.  He enlisted in Streatheavan, Lanarkshire and went to France on 13 Jul 1915.  On 9 Apr 1917 he was the No.1 on a gun and died due to a premature exploding in the gun.  He is buried in the Faubourg D’Amiens Cemetery, Arras.
Gnr.
Craig
   
A/58
Gunner Craig was wounded on Gallipoli on 1 Sep 1915.
Bdr.
Crighton
Robert
1833
D/58
Robert Crighton was born in Winson Green, Warks.  He enlisted in Nuneaton, Warks, and died of his wounds on 15 Aug 1917.  He is buried in Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery.
Gnr.
Crockford
John
94307
C/58
William John Crockford was known as John.  He was born in 1891 in Alton, Hants, and became a butcher.  He was married to Eliza Amelia Crockford.  On the morning of 29 Sep 1917 he was resting in his dug out with some of his comrades when a shell struck, killing him as well as Cpl Ernie Inch and Bdr Harold Wragg.  He was 26.  They were buried the next day by the Chaplain, Rev Cecil G Ruck, and all are believed to be buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium.
Bdr.
Crocombe
   
B/58?
Bdr Crocombe (most likely Bdr William Crocombe, service number 51113) was one of the NCOs who witnessed the absence from roll call on 2 Mar 1915 of Dvr Ernest Ballard (10994).
Maj.
Crozier
Thomas Henry
n/a
A/58
Thomas Henry Crozier was born on 26 Feb 1868 in Monkstown, Dublin.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt on 17 Feb 1888, promoted to Lt. on 17 Feb 1891, promoted to Captain on 18 Apr 1898 and to Major on 12 Sep 1903.  By 1911, he was 43 and had retired from the Army and was now HM Inspector of Explosions at the Home Office.   He was living in Kensington in London with his wife Ethel Minnie Crozier, and they had three domestic servants – a cook, a parlour maid and a housemaid.  He was recalled to the Army and made OIC of 184 Bty, which became A/58.  As such he chaired the Court of Enquiry into Dvr Chaplin’s accident, on 18 Nov 1914.  On 31 May 1915, he acted as the Bde Commander when the King inspected 11 Division on Thursley Common.  He sailed on SS “Knight Templar” from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915 arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He may have been evacuated from Gallipoli on 13 Oct 1915.  After his war service he returned to the Home Office and became Chief Inspector of Explosives, for which he was knighted in the 1930 Birthday Honours.  He died in 1948 in Folkestone.  
Bdr.
Crump
Alfred Bray
56099
 
Born in Birmingham on 9 Feb 1891, Alfred Bray Crump was baptised on 27 Sep the same year.  He enlisted in the Army on 18 Feb 1909.  In 1911, he was serving in 134 Battery in Hampshire.  He was serving in 29th Bde RFA when he was posted to France on 23 Aug 1914.   He was discharged from the Army on 6 Mar 1918 due to wounds received.  After the war he married twice, Emily Mullet in 1919 in Coventry and Alice Ayton in 1946 also in Coventry.  He became a clerk in the Ministry of Labour in 1935.  He died in 1968 in Coventry.
A/Bdr.
Curtis
John
93523
B/58
John Curtis was born in Athy, Kildare, Ireland.  He enlisted in Glasgow and was an Acting Bombardier on 9 Jan 1917 when he was killed in action.
Saddler
Curtis
William John 
11274
C/58
William John Curtis was born on 21 Mar 1890 in Wolverton, Bucks.  Before he enlisted, he was a coach trimmer.  He enlisted in Oxford on 2 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  He was posted then to B/59 on 11 Sep 1914 and was appointed a saddler on 5 Mar 1915.  He sailed from the UK on 2 Jul 1915, arriving at Alexandria on 15 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 8 Aug 1915.  He left Gallipoli from Suvla Bay on 20 Dec 1915 arriving at Alexandria on 5 Jan 1916.  He was appointed Acting Corporal Saddler on 15 Feb 1916, posted to C/58 the same day and confirmed in that rank on 25 Jun 1916.  That was also the day he sailed from Alexandria, arriving at Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance with a fever of unknown origin on 20 Feb 1917 and was then transferred to the UK on Hospital Ship “Panama”.  He was admitted on 15 Mar 1917 to the Northern General Hospital, Leeds, and was transferred from there on 3 Apr 1917 to the civilian and military hospital Harrogate where he stayed until 1 Jun 1917.  He was posted to 5C Reserve Bde, to No.7 Depot and then to 4 Reserve Bde.  He was finally posted to 416 Bty on 27 Sep 1918 and then to 416 Ammunition Column on 3 Oct 1918.  He was posted to Dispersal Centre on 31 Jan 1919 for demobilisation.  He had five children with Emily Jane Watson between 1918 and 1932. He died in 1967 at the age of 77.
2/Lt.
Dalton
 
n/a
 
On 7 Oct 1915 while 58th Bde was fighting on Gallipoli, a 2/Lt Dalton was due to join them imminently as a reinforcement.
2/Lt.
Dane
 
n/a
 
2/Lt Dane had joined 58th Bde “during the reorganisation” (possibly in late November 1916 from A/133) and was posted on 2 Dec 1916 to 11 Division Ammunition Column. 
Maj.
Dane     
James Auchinleck
n/a
OIC D/58
James Auchinleck Dane was born on 18 May 1883, and was commissioned into the RFA in 1902, having been a Gentleman Cadet at the Royal Military Academy Woolwich.  He married Elgiva Mary Kathorn Fitzwilliam on 9 Oct 1909, and they had three children.  He was recalled to active service having retired from the Army as a Lieutenant.  On 1 Jan 1916 he was Mentioned in Despatches and described as a Captain in the Special Reserve.  He had been promoted to Major and was the battery commander of 461 (Howitzer) Battery, also known as C/118 (Howitzer) Bde, when that battery transferred to become the new D/60 at Croiselle on 15 Jul 1916.  He was still commanding D/60 when it was broken up to provide extra guns to 58 Bde, so he was posted to 58 Bde on 25 Jan 1917 and was appointed OIC D/58 on 13 Feb 1917.  In early April 1917 he was acting as OIC 58th Bde temporarily    He was again Mentioned in Despatches on 18 May 1917 and on 11 Dec 1917.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order on 26 Nov 1917 “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His battery came under a heavy enemy barrage, during which an ammunition dump was exploded, destroying two gun pits, burying an officer, and killing several men. He at once went through the barrage, and after half an hour’s work, with the help of three others, succeeded in rescuing the officer. During this time the barrage was so intense that no other help could reach the position. He set a magnificent example of courage and contempt of danger to his battery.” This may refer to a direct hit reported to have taken place on D/58 positions on 2 Oct 1917 which resulted in the deaths of 7 men.  On 7 Dec 1917, he returned to the brigade after a period of absence and again took over as OIC 58th Bde temporarily from Maj Hutchinson.  He reviewed the positions the brigade would take over from 46 Division Artillery on 20 Dec 1917.  At that time, 58th Bde was formed with other units into the “Cambrin Group” and Maj Dane went to the HQ of that group on 21 Dec 1917 but was replaced by Lt Col Wray on 27 Dec 1917.  He acted as Cambrin Group OIC from 6 Jan 1918 when Lt Col Wray went on leave, but only until a more senior replacement arrived 2 days later, though Maj Dane did continue to act as OIC 58th Bde until Wray returned on 21 Jan 1918.  Maj Dane went on leave between 4 and 20 Mar 1918, but after a major gas attack on 8 and 9 April 1918, he had to retire to the wagon lines and then go to No.55 Casualty Clearing Station.  He was struck off the strength of 58th Bde as of 11 Apr 1918 due to having been “wounded gas”, spending time recuperating at the GHQ Rest Home, Paris Plage.  After the war he was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of the County of Huntingdon on 30 Oct 1919 and served as a Commissioner in the Scouts with Baden-Powell.  He died on 20 Jan 1927, aged 43.
2/Lt. 
Daniel 
Emil McCarthy
n/a
D/58
Born on 29 Nov 1895, in Candy, Ceylon [Kandy, Sri Lanka] Emil McCarthy Daniel studied in the City and Guilds College, London, and was in the Officer Training Corps (OTC) of the University of London.  Having been a cadet in the OTC he was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt on 5 Oct 1914 and served in 58 Bde Ammunition Column in late 1914.  On 21 Jan 1915 he transferred into the new D/58, but he did not go overseas with the brigade in July of that year.  Instead, he joined 27 Bde near La Petite Douve on 9 Mar 1915 for instruction, leaving 27 Bde and returning to the UK on 22 Mar 1915, presumably to re-join 58 Bde because he was described as serving in that unit in August 1915 while convalescing in Millbank Hospital in London and was to report to 3A Reserve Bde in Athlone when he was fit.  He sailed from Marseilles on 4 Dec 1915 on the “Royal George”, disembarking in Basrah on 1 Jan 1916.  He was confirmed in rank on 29 Jan 1916, but a few months later, on 18 May 1916, he was made an A/Capt while in command of an Ammunition Column (AC), probably 134 Bde AC, relinquishing that rank on 8 Aug 1916 when he ceased to be in command of an AC.  He joined 61 Battery, 134 Bde RFA on 19 Sep 1916 was again made an A/Capt between 20 Sep and 5 Nov 1916 and between 22 Nov and 20 Dec 1916.  His unit was in Mesopotamia on 22 Feb 1917 when he was severely wounded in both legs, which necessitated the amputation of both legs below the knee.  After treatment at 135 Combined Field Ambulance and at 31st British Stationary hospital in Baghdad, he was evacuated back to the UK on Hospital Ship “Devanha”, sailing from Bombay [Mumbai] on 1 June 1917 and arriving at Avonmouth on 3 Aug 1917.  He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital on 5 Aug 1917, before being transferred to the Queen Mary’s Convalescent Auxiliary Hospital in Dover House, Roehampton on 20 Aug 1917.   On 8 Oct 1917, he married Agnes Sidney Wilkins, a widow, in St Phillip’s Kensington.  In March 1918 permission was given to spend £35 14 shillings for two artificial limbs for him, these were duly fitted though there was a delay in fitting one of them because the stump had not adequately healed  By Jan 1919 both legs were fitted satisfactorily so Daniel asked to be “gazetted out”, which was granted and so he relinquished his commission on 19 Jan 1919 due to ill-health caused by wounds and was eligible for a Silver War Badge, retaining the rank of Captain.  He and Agnes had a son in 1921 but separated soon after.  He married twice more, to Mabel Clara Alice Mitchell in 1924, who divorced him in 1929 due to an affair he had with Eileen Dora Page who he married the following year.  He was assigned to the Clerical Class of the Civil Service on 7 Apr 1923 and worked in the Home Office, before transferring to the Ministry of Labour the following year.  By 1939 he was divorced again and working as a clerk in the Post Office Engineering Department, and at that time, he was living in The Gables, Wroxham, Norfolk with an 18-year old hairdressing apprentice, Miss Enid Hilda Rust.  He died on 8 Apr 1941 at the Overdale Nursing Home, Westmount, Jersey.  Probate was granted to Enid Rust.  His son, Patrick, served as a Typhoon pilot in the Second World War with 247 Sqn RAF and was killed in action on 28 Feb 1944 over Brittany. 
Bdr.
Davidson
James
80771
C/58
James Davidson was the son of John and Margaret Davidson.  After his father’s death, his mother emigrated to Australia.  After he enlisted, he became a member of C/58 and sailed to Egypt probably with his battery in July 1915.  On 2 Aug 1915, while in Egypt he was tried for an unrecorded offence by Regimental Court Martial and was sentenced to 42 days detention.  He was killed on 5 Oct 1917 along with Gnr William Joynson while serving in the Ypres salient when an enemy shell scored a direct hit on the gun pit they were in.  He is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery.
Bdr.
Daw
   
B/58?
Bdr Daw had to report the absence from Chapeltown Barracks of Dvr Ernest Ballard (10994) on three occasions between 1 Dec 1914 and 1 Feb 1915, as well as the absence of Dvr Frederick Harris (10607) on 6-7 Jan 1915.   
2/Lt.
Dawson
H M
n/a
C/58?
2/Lt H M Dawson embarked at Liverpool on 1 Jul 1915 on the “Empress Britain” bound for Alexandria.    On 4 September 1915, while serving on Gallipoli, he was put in charge of a party of 116 men who were being sent off the peninsular, at which point he probably left 58 Bde.  It is likely that this is Herbert Henry Mawson Dawson, who was admitted to 17 General Hospital Alexandria, on 18 Sep 1915, with fibrositis, and was evacuated back to the UK on 21 Oct 1915 on Hospital Ship “Aquitania” with rheumatoid- and osteo-myalgia.  On 20 Nov 1915 Herbert Henry Mawson Dawson was posted to 2C Reserve Bde in Leeds, which was also his home town.  On 23 Feb 1916 he was posted to 150 Bde RFA but was admitted to 8 General Hospital Rouen with kidney trouble on 8 Mar 1916.  He was again evacuated to the UK on 14 Mar 1916 on Hospital Ship “St Andrew” and sent to the Convalescent Home for Officers at Osborne, Isle of Wight.  Herbert Henry Mawson Dawson was posted to 148 Bde RFA on 6 Jun 1916 but was killed in action less than 2 weeks later on 19 Jul 1916.  
Gnr.
Day    
Alfred
75794
D/58
Alfred Day was born on 21 May 1896 in St Mary’s Cray, Kent.  After he left school, he worked as a farm labourer.  He enlisted in Woolwich to join the pre-war regular Army on 21 Jan 1914 on terms of 6 years with the colours and a further 6 years in the Reserves.   He was posted initially to Preston.  On 30 Sep 1914 he “made a false statement to a superior officer” and so was punished on 2 Oct 1914 with being confined to barracks for 7 days.  On 7 Apr 1915 he was posted to 4A Reserve Bde, and from there to France on 30 Apr 1915, where he was posted to 118 Bde on 16 May 1915.  He joined D/58, most likely when a battery of that brigade was assigned to 58th Bde as the new D/58 on 15 Jul 1916.  He was awarded the Military Medal on 22 Dec 1916.  On 5 Jul 1917 he was absent from a 7.30pm watering parade so was docked 4 days’ pay by OIC 58 Bde.  On 20 Sep 1917 he was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK.  He was badly wounded on 1 Oct 1918, probably by shrapnel, with the wounds being described at different times as being in his chest, back and right side.   The OIC of 33 Casualty Clearing Station reported him “dangerously wounded” and a telegram to that effect was sent to his wife, Ivy Day (née Harry) though “permission to visit cannot be granted”.  He was admitted to 22 General Hospital Camiers on 13 Oct 1918 and evacuated back to the UK on 9 Nov 1918.  He recuperated at the Royal Herbert Hospital, Shooters Hill, Woolwich, and was discharged as “no longer physically fit for war service” on 6 Mar 1919.  He was awarded a weekly pension of 11 shillings because he was still 40% disabled.    After the war his MM was posted to him by registered post.  In 1921, he was living in Newtown, Exeter when he re-enlisted in Exeter for 90 days service as a signaller in the Wessex Division Signals Defence Force during the period of “national emergency”, from 15 Apr to 4 July 1921.  
Bdr.
Deamer
George
895200
 
George Deamer was serving in 58 Bde in late 1918 when the Absent Voter List for St Albans was compiled.  He had previously been a member of the Territorial Force where his service number was 526.
Lt.
Delaforce  
Victor Shore de Fleurriet 
n/a
C/58
Victor Shore de Fleurriet Delaforce was born in Oporto, Portugal, on 20 Jan 1896 into the family who owned the House of Delaforce port wine business.  After attending Radley School, he was commissioned into the RFA on 30 Dec 1915 aged 19 (under para 3 of Army Order 333 of 1915).  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917 and Mentioned in Despatches on 11 Dec 1917.  He was made an Acting Captain on 19 Dec 1917 “while specially employed”, and awarded the Military Cross in the New Year’s Honours 1918.  On 28 Apr 1918 he joined C/58 from 11 Division Ammunition Column and reverted to Lt because he had “ceased to hold a special appointment”.  He left 58th Bde just two weeks later on 12 May 1918 to become second in command of a battery in another brigade and made A/Capt again.  He stayed in the Army after the war, being a Lt in 1922.  That year he also married Joy Fleur Payne.  They had two children, but their marriage only lasted a few years.  In 1926 he became a partner in his father’s port wine shipping company and he designed the bottles in which the port was exported.  In 1939 he married Phyllis Joan Westray and they had two more children.   The oldest of his four children was Patrick Delaforce who followed his father into the Army and the port wine trade but in later life became a writer.  Victor Delaforce died in Porto in 1986, aged 90.
Gnr.
Denley
Howard
74517
A/58
Howard Denley was the son of William and Mary Denley of Wandsworth.  He served with 41st Bde RFA but was serving in A/58 when he was killed in action on 25 Aug 1917 in the Ypres salient alongside his comrades Alec Armitage, John Barber, Frederick Thomas Leathard, William Monks, Arthur Noble and Herbert Taylor.  He is buried alongside them in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium.     
2/Lt.
Denny
Robert Edward
n/a
B/58
Robert Edward Denny was the son of a doctor, Harry Ernest Denny who had been born in Ireland, and Mary who was from the USA.  Robert was born on 24 Apr 1897 in the USA but had moved to Longtown, Cumberland by the time he was 4 years old.  He was probably educated at Clayesmore School, at that time located in Winchester, Hants.  He applied for a commission on 18 Apr 1915 claiming to be a year older than he was and joined the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps on 15 Jul 1915, agreeing to serve overseas.  The following year he attested and joined the Royal Horse Artillery as a gunner (service number 127112) on 10 Mar 1916 and was commissioned on 17 Jun 1916 as a 2/Lt in Special Reserve of Officers having been in an Officer Cadet Unit.  He was posted to France in April 1917 and after a brief posting to 11 Division Ammunition Column (DAC), he was transferred to B/58 on 26 Apr 1917 and went on a gunnery course on 24 Jun 1917.  He must have returned to 11 DAC shortly afterwards because he was posted from there to 59 Bde on 24 Jul 1917.  He was promoted to Lt on 17 Dec 1917.  On 7 Apr 1918 he was serving in D/59 near Cambrin, France when he was wounded by shrapnel in three places: his head, left shoulder and left hand.  He was evacuated to 2/1 Wessex Field Ambulance and 58 Casualty Clearing Station the same day, then to No.1 British Red Cross Hospital at Le Touquet on 12 Apr 1918.  From there he was sent to the UK on 6 Jun 1918 where he was admitted to the Officers’ War Hospital, Exeter.  Over the course of at least a year he had several operations and received much treatment and massages for his wounds: there were three fractures to his skull, two of which needed trepanning, the wound to his shoulder had penetrated his lung and damaged the muscle in his scapula, and his index finger on his left hand had to be amputated.  He received treatment at Millbank Hospital, the Convalescent Hospital Morehampstead, in Exeter and in his new home town of Barnstaple.  On 13 Aug 1919, he was placed on the retired list on account of ill-health caused by wounds.  In 1939 he was working in Barnstaple as a furniture dealer and as an ARP sub-controller, and was married to Winifred, though she died on 29 Nov 1952 so on 1 Mar 1954 Robert married Christine.  Robert died on 23 Dec 1968 in Barnstaple, aged 71.
Lt.
Devenish
Charles Oliver Lloyd
n/a
B/58
Born on 11 Jun 1896, Charles Oliver Lloyd Devenish was the son of solicitor William Devenish and his wife Beatrice, of Kensington, London.  He went to Haileybury School between 1910 and 1914.  He graduated from the Royal Military Academy on 10 Feb 1915 and was commissioned as a 2/Lt.  He was promoted from 2/Lt to Lt on 8 Aug 1916.  He was posted to 58th Bde from 59th Bde on 24 Mar 1919.  After the war he stayed in the Army, was promoted to Captain and served in Iraq 1921-27.  He was bequeathed a property in Bath (along with his probable brother) in 1946 at which time he was living at 5 Herbert Road, Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset.  He died in 1977.
Bdr.
Dickson
Hamilton
63854
 
Hamilton Dickson was a pre-war regular who had enlisted into the RFA on 12 Jan 1911.  He was serving with 27th Bde when he went to France with the BEF on 14 Aug 1914.  He was discharged from the Army on 16 Aug 1918 due to wounds he had received while serving with 58th Bde.  
Sgt.
Dobby 
Frank
20929
C/58
Born in 1891, Frank Dobby was a railway clerk with North Eastern Railway from Leeming, N Yorks.  His father, Francis had been a tailor and publican.  Frank married Mary Jane Girdley of Bishop Burton, Beverley, Yorks in 1915.  He was serving as a Sgt in C/58 on 25 Apr 1918 while acting as clearing up party at C/58 wagon lines which had just been moved, when he was killed alongside Gnr McCarthy by enemy shellfire.  He is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension.
Gnr.
Doel
Arthur George
94977
 
Arthur George Doel (known as George) was born in 1881 in Oldham Lancs.  He was a bricklayer’s labourer and he married Alice Maud Rumble in 1910.  He enlisted into the RFA on 15 Mar 1915.  He was serving in 58th Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 12 Dec 1917 being unfit for military service due to wounds received.  Both he and Alice were killed on 2 Oct 1940 when their home at 130 Manor Park, Harlesden, London was destroyed in the Blitz.  
Sgt.
Doggett 
Albert Edward Victor 
74973
D/58
Albert Edward Victor Doggett was from Sipson, Middx.  He was born on 31 Jul 1897 to Charles and Emma Doggett.  After his father died while Albert was a boy, his mother remarried.  Albert was a pre-war regular having joined the Army on 17 Nov 1913, aged 16 years 3 months. He was promoted to Bombardier on 16 June 1914 and was posted to 57 (H) battery.  He was mobilised on 5 Aug 1914 into 43 (How.) Bde RFA in 1st Division.  He fought at Mons, during the Great Retreat, and on the Marne and Aisne.  He moved to Ypres in mid-October 1914 and was wounded by a German shell on 4 Nov 1914.  He was evacuated to the UK and treated at Norfolk Hospital, Norwich.  On 8 Jan 1915 he was promoted to Cpl, still aged just 17 years 5 months.  He was posted to A/81 Bde, part of 17 (Northern) Division at Swanage.  He was promoted to Sgt on 7 May 1915, aged 17 years 10 months.  His division moved to Winchester in June 1915 and proceeded to France on 13 Jul 1915. They went into the Ypres sector and on 5 Aug 1915 were in action at Hooge. On 11 Aug 1915, A/81, including Sgt Doggett and a portion of the Ammunition Column, were withdrawn and posted to 118(H) Bde, who were attached to 1(Canadian) Division at Ploegsteert. Between September and December, they shelled German trenches and rear areas around Ploegsteert including Petite Douve Farm and Messines Town.  On 25 Sep 1915, A/81 was renamed 460 Battery then on 15 Dec 1915, 460 Battery was renamed 461 Battery.  Albert spent Christmas 1915 in the line and as 461 Battery Sgt’s Mess Sgt Doggett was to sing “Old Soldiers Never Die”.  On 4 Apr 1916, 118(H) Bde moved north to the Ypres area and were engaged in shelling Hill 60 and St Eloi. On 15 July 1916, 118(H) Bde was broken up: 461 Battery (including Sgt Doggett) was transferred to 58th Bde RFA as the new D/58 just after the brigade had arrived from Egypt.  Sgt Doggett stayed with D/58 for the rest of the war and won a Distinguished Conduct Medal on 7 Nov 1918 at Eth Wood “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Eth Wood on 7th Nov 1918.  When only one subaltern was left in the battery, he carried out the duties of the other, and, on one occasion, took entire charge of the work of the battery under heavy shell fire. He invariably displayed the greatest skill and courage in carrying out whatever duties it fell to him to perform.”  As a regular soldier he left D/58 in February 1919 when he was posted to Cork and he transferred to the reserve in Dec 1920. He died in Bournemouth in 1991 aged 94. 
2/Lt.
Dolphin
William Heathcote
n/a
 
William Heathcote Dolphin was born in Blackheath, Kent, in 1882, the son of James (a stock and share broker) and his wife Jane.   He enlisted in the Honourable Artillery Company on 24 Aug 1914 and was discharged on 8 Feb 1915 after being commissioned as a 2/Lt.  He joined 58th Bde as a reinforcement from Mudros in late September 1915.   In Nov 1915 he suffered from ear damage while at Suvla Bay with 58th Bde.  On 3 Aug 16 he was attached to A/60 for instruction and appointed town commandant of Simoncourt the same day.  On 1 Sep 1916 he was still serving with 60 Bde on the Somme when he suffered damage in his other ear and left the Bde.  He was evacuated to England on “St Andrew” from Boulogne to Dover on 12 Sep 1916.  He was promoted to T/Lt on 1 Jul 1917.  He entered into a marriage bond with Jennie Harding on 3 Aug 1918.  On 21 Nov 1918 he wrote asking to resign his commission so that he could return to his civilian occupation of being an underwriter and insurance broker at Lloyds.  The request was approved and he resigned his commission on 4 Jan 1919, retaining the rank of Lt.   He died though 2 years later on 11 Apr 1921.  He was described as being “Late of Sudely, Kingsbury Garden Village, Willesden, Middx formerly of 10 Harewood House, Hanover Sq.”  
2/Lt.
Donne
Claude Harold
n/a
C/58
Claude Harold Donne was born on 22 Dec 1894 in Brighton, Sussex, the son of William John and Rose Maud Donne.  By the time he was 16 he was a clerk for a house agent.  He attested as a gunner in the Territorial unit, the 3/1st Home Counties Bde RFA on 10 Dec 1915 and was mobilised on 25 May 1916.  He served with the unit until he applied for a commission with service number 901443.  He attended No.1 Cadet School, St John’s Wood, London, from where he was commissioned into the RFA on 14 Jan 1918 as a 2/Lt in the Territorial Force having trained in an Officer Cadet Unit.  He was first posted to France on 2 May 1918.  He served initially in 11 Division Ammunition Column but was soon transferred from there to join 58 Bde on 19 May 1918.  He was initially assigned to C/58.   On 17 Aug 1918, he was serving in D/58 when he went on an artillery course at 1 Corps School.  He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 28 Oct 1918, rejoining from leave on 16 Nov 1918.  He rejoined from the “Hospital Dump” on 25 Feb 1919 and had a further 14 days’ leave between 2 and 19 Mar 1919.  He was granted furlough between 24 Jun and 22 Jul 1919, after which he was attached to 124 Company Motor Transport of the Army Service Corps until 20 Jan 1920.  He was promoted to Lt while serving with 1st Home Counties Bde RFA on 14 July 1919 and successfully applied to join the Territorial Force Reserve resigned his commission on 11 Aug 1920.  After the war he became a schoolmaster and on 23 July 1927 was living in Alexandra Park, Middx, when he married Elizabeth Mary Catherine Borman.   In 1939 they were living in St Ives, Huntingdonshire, where he continued to work as a schoolmaster and his wife was helping with evacuees.  He died aged 68 in 1963.  
Gnr.
Donnelly
Peter
103773
 
Peter Donnelly enlisted on 18 Aug 1915.  He was serving with 58th Bde when he was discharged on 2 Jan 1918 due to injuries he had received.  
Gnr.
Downall
Frederick
12686
A/58
Frederick Downall was born in Tattenhall, near Chester, in 1895, the son of Frederick Downall.  He was a butcher living at 6 Crown Terrace, Mill Lane, Newton-le-Willows when he enlisted in Warrington on 3 Sept 1914, aged 19.   He was posted to C/75 on 1 Oct 1914 and went to France with that battery on 2 Sep 1915.  On 23 Nov 1916 he was posted to 133 Bde RFA, then less than a week later to A/58 on 29 Nov 1916.  On 15 Jan 1917 he was admitted to 55 Field Ambulance with scabies and returned to his battery on 20 Jan 1917.  He was appointed an A/Bdr on 18 Sep 1917 and promoted to Bdr on 23 Sep 1917.  On New Year’s Eve 1917, he was the evening orderly and, when returning to the wagon lines from the gun lines, the roads were covered in snow and ice and he slipped, dislocating his left elbow.  He was posted to the Base depot between 20 Feb and 5 Apr 1918 (which included a period of leave between 8 and 28 March) before returning to A/58.  Three weeks later he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance on 27 Apr 1918 with a strained elbow.  On 23 Nov 1918 he was accused of illtreating a mule for which he was “severely reprimanded”.  He was sent to the dispersal centre at Prees Heath on 20 Jun 1919 ready for demobilisation.  On 30 Oct 1920 he married Mary O’Connel, who was known as Dolly.  They lived in Warrington which is where Dolly passed away in 1959 aged 65, and where Fred passed away on 10 Jan 1963, aged 68.
Lt. Col.
Drake
Henry Manning
n/a
Bde Cdr
Henry Manning Drake was born on 19 Dec 1869 in London.  He joined the Army and was commissioned into the RFA.  He was promoted to Capt while acting as an Adjutant on 15 Feb 1897 and he married Gertrude Eleanor Davis on 27 Jun 1899 in Liverpool.  On 3 Jul 1907 he was made a Captain again having been a supernumerary Captain By 1911 he was a Major and was commanding the 62nd Battery in Multan, in what was then India but is now Pakistan.  He was still there when war broke out in August 1914, and his battery was recalled to the UK as part of 3 Bde RFA.  He was promoted to Lt Col on 30 Oct 1914 and went to France in January 1915 though it is unclear with which unit.  He must have returned to the UK shortly afterwards because he was commanding 58th Bde by early April 1915. He sailed with 58th Bde on SS Knight Templar from Devonport on 1 July 1915 and arrived in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He landed at ‘B’ Beach, Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, on 9 Aug 1915 and set about getting his brigade into action.  It is not clear when he left 58th Bde – it may have been in about April 1916.  He later served under General Allenby in Egypt and Palestine, including acting temporarily as the Commander Royal Artillery of 60th Division.  On 27 Oct 1917 he relinquished the temporary rank of Brigadier General.  He was Mentioned in Despatches by Gen Allenby while serving in RHA between 19 Sep 1918 and 31 Mar 1919.  He retired from the Army as a Lt Col on 30 Apr 1920, aged 50.  He may have died in Bournemouth in 1944, aged 74.  
A/Bdr.
Drury
William Richard John
10661
D/58
William Richard John Drury was baptised on 15 Jun 1895 in Pucklechurch, nr Bristol, Glos, the son of Frederick William and Ada Jane Drury.  He enlisted into the RFA in Bristol, probably in early September 1914 and went to Egypt probably with 58th Bde in July 1915.  He was killed in action on 8 Oct 1917 and is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery.  
Dvr.
Duckworth
Frederic
781108
A/58
Frederic Duckworth was serving with A/58 when the absent voters list for Accrington was compiled in the autumn of 1918.  He had enlisted into the Territorial Force.
Bdr.
Duling
J
55961
A/58
Bdr J Duling of Gillingham, Kent, was serving with A/58 when he was discharged from the Army on 15 Jun 1916 as being no longer fit for active service due to wounds received.  
2/Lt.
Duncan
Charles Maitland
n/a
B/58
2/Lt Charles Maitland Duncan was posted to 58 Bde in Leeds on 14 Sep 1914 and was serving in 58 Bde Ammunition Column in January 1915 but had transferred to B/58 before sailing with the brigade on SS “Knight Templar” from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915. 
Gnr.
Dunn   
Albert
180938
C/58
Albert Dunn from Taunton, Somerset, was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field on 24 May 1918 while serving with C/58.  By the time his award was published in the London Gazette on 13 Sep 1918, he appears to have transferred to the RHA and been given the new service number of 606119.
Dvr.
Duthoit
Cyril
96491
D/58
Born in about 1879 in Leeds, Yorks, Cyril Duthoit worked as a potman in a public house and as a general labourer before the war.  He enlisted in Leeds and that must have been soon after war was declared because he went to France on 22 May 1915.  He was serving with D/58 on 23 Aug 1918 when he was one of a party of men helping get a wagon out of a ditch.  As they worked, an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on them.  Cyril was one of nine men killed, with one more later dying of wounds.  He is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension alongside 7 of his former comrades.
Sgt.
Dyer
Ernest Frank
22249
D/58
Ernest Frank Dyer was born in Islington, London on 31 Jul 1883, the son of Henry Francis and Anne M Dyer.  He attended Gayhurst Road School.  He was a farrier by trade, and he enlisted in Harringay on 8 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.6 Depot, Glasgow, and from there to 253 Battery, 81 Bde RFA on 30 Oct 1914 and appointed A/Bdr the same day.  He was promoted to Bdr on 16 Dec 1914, to Cpl on 20 Jan 1915 and to Sgt on 26 Mar 1915.  He landed at Le Havre on 14 Jul 1915 and his battery was transferred to 118 Bde RFA on 12 Aug 1915 and renumbered as 460 Battery before being re-numbered again as 461 Battery on 9 Dec 1915.  He was granted leave to the UK between 22 and 30 Jan 1916.  With the rest of his battery he was transferred to 60 Bde RFA to form the new D/60 on 15 Jul 1916 and then he transferred to D/58 when D/60 was broken up on 27 Jan 1917.  While serving in D/58, he was recommended for a commission on 5 Mar 1917.  He returned to the UK on 22 Mar 1917 to attend an Officer Cadet Unit to train him to be an officer and he was posted to No.4 Officer Cadet School, Preston Barracks, Brighton.  While there he bumped into his former battery commander, Capt Carlton Roberts who was convalescing after being wounded.  In a letter of 25 Jun 17, Capt Roberts says that he met Dyer on Brighton pier: “He is at a Cadet School here.  He was surprised to see me I think, we had a little heart to heart talk about the old firm.  I hope to see some more of him.”   Dyer was commissioned on 21 Sep 1917 and was posted to C/330 Bde RFA on 29 Apr 1918.  He was admitted to the New Zealand Stationary Hospital with sciatica on 2 Jun 1918, then to 8 British Red Cross Hospital on 7 Jun 1918 before being evacuated via Boulogne to Dover on 15 Jun 1918 on the AT “Pieter de Coninck”.  He was admitted to Fishmonger’s Hospital the same day.  He attended Medical Boards on 23 Jul and 25 Sep 1918 which estimated on both occasions that he would not be fit for general service for at least 3 months, recommending that he stay in a convalescent hospital.  A further board declared him permanently unfit on 12 Mar 1919.  He was promoted to Lt on 21 Mar 1919 but relinquished his commission a few weeks later on 24 Apr 1919 due to ill-health.  He died in London in 1974, aged 91.
BQMS
Eadie
Robert
715419
B/58
Robert Eadie was born in Maryport, Cumberland, the son of Francis (“Fanny”) Eadie.  He worked as a butcher’s assistant before the war.  He joined the Territorial Force with 1/4 East Lancashire Bde RFA.  At some point he joined 58th Bde and was serving as the BQMS of B/58 when, in early June 1918 he was transferred to C/58 to replace an inefficient BQMS in that battery.  On 26 Sep 1918 he was killed in action, aged 35, leaving a widow, Mary Jane Eadie.  He is buried in Sunken Road Cemetery, Boisleux-St. Marc, France.
Lt.
Eardley 
William Edward
n/a
A/58
William Edward Eardley was made a T/Capt while commanding a battery between 21 Dec 1915 and 20 Feb 1916.  During that period, he was formally promoted to Lt on 1 Jan 1916.   He was serving with 11 Division Ammunition Column when he was transferred to 58th Bde on 13 Sep 1917.  He joined A/58 though a few weeks later was transferred to C/58 on 5 Oct 1917.  He acted as Liaison Officer to infantry battalions during an attack on 9 Oct 1917.  He went on 14 days leave to UK on 30 Dec 1917, returning on 15 Jan 1918.  He was gassed on 9 Apr 1918 along with many others and retired to the wagon lines.  He was struck off the strength of the brigade on 14 Apr 1918 having been “wounded gas”. 
Dvr.
Edmonds
Samuel
100472
 
Samuel Edmonds served in 58 Bde as a Driver. He was demobilised in March 1919.
2/Lt.
Edney-Hayter
Edmund George
n/a
 
Born in about 1894, Edmund George Edney-Hayter was commissioned on 4 Jan 1915 having served in an Officers Training Corps.  He was serving with 13th (Western) Division at Gallipoli when he was temporarily attached to 58th Bde on 17 Sep 1915.  He left Gallipoli for Mudros on 8 Oct 1915.  After the war he became a planter and so on 13 Jul 1919 he sailed from Liverpool to Singapore.  His home in the UK was in Whitchurch, Hants, and it was from here that he sailed from Southampton to Penang, Malaya on 4 Dec 1929.   He may have gone bankrupt in 1939, but a few months after the Second World War started he was given an emergency commission as Lt on 31 Dec 1939.  After that war, he took up a post as a Government Officer and his wife, Anna Andree Edney-Hayter, sailed from Southampton on 25 Feb 1947 to Singapore.  His wife died in 1957, aged 59, in Essex.
2/Lt.
Edwards
C
n/a
B/58
2/Lt C Edwards served in 11 Division Ammunition Column and transferred from there to join B/58 on 26 Apr 1918.
Gnr.
Edwards
Cedric
10600
B/58
Cedric Edwards was born in Norwich and enlisted in Rugby soon after war was declared.  He was probably born in 1891 and was a clerk in a draper’s before the war.  He was appointed an A/Bdr but, for reasons unknown, reverted to Gunner.  He died at Mudros on the island of Lemnos on 10 Sep 1915 and is buried in the Portianos Military Cemetery, Lemnos.  
Cpl.
Edwards
2893
A/58
Cpl E Edwards was from Battersea.  While serving as a Bdr, he was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 17 Sep 1917.  He was serving in A/58 when he went to hospital and his place was taken by Bdr Donald Forbes (1581).  He finished the war as a Sgt.  
Gnr.
Edwards
Sidney George
11256
C/58
Sidney George Edwards was born in Petersfield, Hants in 1896.  As a 19 year-old shop assistant he enlisted in Portsmouth on 3 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.   From there, he was posted to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which became C/58.  He went Absent without Leave between 14 and 21 Feb 1915, so was admonished by Lt Col Kuper and fined 7 days’ pay.  He then missed a 10pm roll call on 5 Mar 1915 and as a result was confined to barracks for 3 days.  He embarked at Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He again embarked at Alexandria on 24 Jul 1915 bund for Mudros and then Gallipoli.  On Gallipoli, he was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance with dysentery on 11 Oct 1915 and was discharged back to duty a week later, on 18 Oct 1915.  He was slightly wounded on 9 Dec 1915.  After the evacuation, he arrived back in Alexandria on 1 Jan 1916.  He was due to be posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 10 May 1916, but the posting was cancelled the same day.  Instead, he embarked again at Alexandria on 12 Aug 1916 to join the forces at Salonika, arriving there on 15 Aug 1916.  He joined 129 Bde, part of 27 Division.  While at Salonika, he committed the offence of being “absent from his post at 11pm” on 5 Jan 1917 having left his post before he had been relieved.  For this, he was tried by Field General Court Martial on 15 Jan 1917 and was sentenced to 1 year imprisonment with hard labour which was commuted to 90 days’ Field Punishment No.1.  The sentence was confirmed by the Brigadier General Royal Artillery for 27 Division.  He was sent to prison at No.1 Con Camp, and then sent to Base depot on 14 Apr 1917 (having had 3 days of his sentence remitted for “good conduct whilst undergoing punishment”).  He was in trouble again soon after, when on 14 May 1917 he was sentenced to 7 days’ Field Punishment No.2 for not complying with an order.  He was admitted to 81 Field Ambulance on 13 Dec 1917 with a fever, rejoining HQ 129 Bde on 18 Dec 1917.  He returned to 81 Field Ambulance on 14 Feb 1918 again with a fever and was then next day sent to 2/1 Northumbrian Field Ambulance before being sent to 52 General Hospital, Salonika, on 21 Feb 1918 at which point it was clear he had malaria.  On 3 Mar 1918 he went to 1 Convalescence Depot and there he was admitted to the “Y” scheme on 20 Mar 1918.  He was discharged to Y Entrenching Battalion on 23 Apr 1918 and was then posted to No.4 Depot on 4 Jun 1918.  He was then sent to 1B Reserve Bde on 8 Jul 1918 ahead of being sent for demobilisation.  He had been employed as a cook in HQ 129 Bde and, despite his misdemeanours, was described as sober, reliable and intelligent by the Adjutant of 129 Bde on 19 Jun 1918.  
L/Bdr.
Egerton
Charles Edward
825191
 
Charles Edward Egerton had enlisted on 18 Jul 1912, probably into the Territorial Force as a Driver under service number 1174.  Having served in the South Midland Bde RFA, he was serving in 58th Bde on 11 Jul 1918 when he was discharged from the Army as no longer being fit for active service due to sickness.  
Dvr.
Elcock
Samuel
11320
 
Samuel Elcock enlisted on 5 Sep 1914.  He was serving in 58th Bde on 29 Jan 1918 when he was discharged from the Army as no longer being fit for active service due to wounds he had received.  
Dvr.
Ellis
Charles Ernest
73556
 
Charles Ernest Ellis was a pre-war regular who enlisted on 12 Jul 1913.  He was serving in 14th Bde RFA when he went to France with the BEF on 14 Aug 1914.  He was serving in 58th Bde on 29 Apr 1918 when he was discharged from the Army as no longer being fit for active service due to sickness. 
Dvr.
Ellis 
Richard Fred
240437
 
Richard Fred Ellis enlisted on 1 Mar 1916.  He was serving in 58th Bde on 24 May 1919 when he was discharged from the Army as no longer being fit for active service due to wounds he had received.
2/Lt.
Ellison
William Julius
n/a
A/58
William Julius Ellison was born on 26 Jun 1891 in Dalhousie India.  He went to Uppingham School and became a student in holy orders and also became a fellow of Clare College Cambridge.  On 10 Sept 1914 he applied for a commission in the Special Reserve, requesting to join the RFA, and was commissioned on the 16th.  He was posted to join 184 Battery, 58 Bde on 21 Sep 1914 and attended the Shoeburyness School of Gunnery in October 1914 and a telephone course at Aldershot in February 1915.  He also attended a course of instruction in France in Feb/Mar 1915.  He sailed on the SS “Knight Templar” from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, suffering sea-sickness on the journey, before arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  After a period in camp, William Ellison, together with 32 men, all 16 of the brigade’s guns as well as 32 ammunition wagons, four water carts and a telephone wagon sailed from Alexandria on the SS “Saldhana”.  These would all have to be man-handled since no horses went with them.  After a few days at Mudros, he and his party landed on 8th August slightly to the south of Suvla Bay, near the beachhead which the Australian and New Zealand troops had established in April.  By the following day he had managed to drag 6 of the guns into position to help the British and ANZAC troops who were attacking out of their beachhead.  This small party was commended for its actions having done “good work” in support of the New Zealanders.  On 1st September, a Turkish shell scored a direct hit on the dug-out where William Ellison was censoring letters.  His left elbow was wounded and his fellow officer, Robert Bragg, was mortally wounded.  He left 58th Bde when he sailed on HMHS “Letitia” bound for Southampton.  His sick leave expired on 21 Dec 1915, so he wrote to request a medical board.  He was staying at Sandacres, Parkstone at the time.  On 9 Feb 1916 he was posted to 41 Division Artillery at Aldershot and a few days later on 16 Feb 1916 was posted to D/187 Bde.  A year later, on 21 Feb 17, and by now a Captain, he was gassed with phosgene and a subsequent medical board identified “symptoms of nervous exhaustion”, saying that he “lies in bed looking happy but cannot be induced to stand or walk, he apparently thinks he cannot do so.”  After the war he married Alice Leich in 1919 and they had a son John Leich Ellison in 1922.  He served with the League of Nations staff and was an experienced mountaineer.  He was climbing the Grand Perron on 20 Sept 31 with a Miss Aline Burnett when they fell.    Miss Burnett died and William was grievously injured.  He crawled 12 yards to a safer spot and was found the next day but died of his injuries in Geneva on 28 Sept 1931.
Bdr.
Elliston
Frederick George
10959
A/58
Born in 1895 in London, Frederick George Elliston was living with his mother Catherine, a hotel proprietress in Gloucester in 1911.  He enlisted in 1914 and served in Gallipoli and Egypt.  He was killed in action on 3 Oct 1917 and is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery.
Dvr.
Elphinstone
James Rennie
10965
A/58
Born on 2 Oct 1892 in Bromley, Kent, James Rennie Elphinstone was a footman from Chislehurst, Kent, before the war.  He enlisted in Yeovil on 31 Aug 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 184 Bty on 2 Sep 1914.   He spent 5 days in hospital with a sprained knee between 5 and 9 Dec 1914.  After 184 Bty became A/58 in early 1915, he embarked at Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He embarked at Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  He left Gallipoli on 8 Sep 1915, arriving back at Alexandria on 23 Sep 1915.  On 21 Oct 1915, he was admitted to 17 General Hospital in Alexandria with diarrhoea.  From there he went to the Transit Camp Mustapha on 8 Nov 1915 and then to the Convalescence Depot Mustapha on 28 Dec 1915, rejoining his unit on 22 Jan 1916.  He was wounded in action on 27 Jul 1917 with a gunshot wound to his head and was admitted to 133 Field Ambulance the same day.  He was discharged to duty on 30 Jul 1917 from 35 Field Ambulance.  On 2 Oct 1917, he was appointed a paid A/Bdr and was promoted to Bdr on 13 Oct 1917.  A year later, on 22 Dec 1918 he was appointed a paid A/Cpl. He went to the Dispersal Centre at Crystal Palace on 19 Jun 19 ready for demobilisation, having served in A/58 throughout.  His character was described as very good.  He died in 1972 in Durham, aged 80.  
BQMS
Emmett
   
A/58?
BQMS Emmett witnessed Gnr McGuire (93021) being drunk and conduct to the prejudice of military discipline at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria, on 20 Jul 1915.   
Gnr.
Englefield
Albert
75988
D/58
Albert Englefield was born in Islington, London, and enlisted in Finsbury Barracks.  He died of wounds received on 1 Nov 1915 in 17th General Hospital, Alexandria, and is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery
Gnr.
Evans 
Andrew
10995
A/58
Born in Birmingham, Andrew Evans was a 21 year-old vice-hand when he enlisted in Coventry on 1 Sep 1914.  After being posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, he was assigned to 184 Bty on 3 Sep 1914, which became A/58.  He committed three offences while training with A/58: on 17 Feb and 3 Apr 1915 he was absent from roll call, being awarded 3 days’ confinement to barracks on both occasions, and on 10 Mar 1915 he was insolent and used “abusive language” so was confined to barracks for 7 days.  In Alexandria he was awarded 8 days’ Field Punishment No.2 for having been on guard duty on 20 Mar 1916 during which he was “concerned in breaking open a case of whisky.”  On 25 Jul 1916 he left 58th Bde when he was posted as a Bdr to join the newly set-up X/11 Trench Mortar Battery (TMB) and was promoted to Cpl the same day.  He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, the award being published in the London Gazette on 19 Feb 1917.  He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No.1 by the OC of 11 Division Ammunition Column for “not complying with a verbal order given him by his superior officer” on 2 Feb 1917.  He must have been wounded because he was severely reprimanded by OC 39 General Hospital that on 28 Jan 1918 “while on active service 1. Interfering with a policeman in the execution of duty, 2. Being in an unshaven condition at 3pm”.  He was posted to the Base depot on 3 Mar 1918. He received a bar to his Military Medal (gazetted on 6 Aug 1918) and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (gazetted on 15 Nov 1918) while still in X/11 TMB for which the citation reads: “He extinguished a fire in the ammunition recess at very great risk, thus saving a disastrous explosion. Two men who had been badly burnt by the explosion of the shell which started the fire ran out into the open, being delirious with pain, and were heavily fired on by the enemy machine guns. Regardless of his own safety, he ran out and got them back under cover. His very gallant and self-sacrificing conduct were admirable, and his example had a great effect on his comrades.”  After the war he went to the Dispersal Centre at Chisledon on 12 Mar 1919 and was demobbed on 9 Apr 1919.  His medals were to be awarded to him in a public ceremony after the war.  He died in Coventry in 1957 aged 64.
2/Lt.
Everill
 
n/a
 
2/Lt Everill joined 58th Bde during a reorganisation – probably the one in late November 1916 – and was posted from the brigade to join 11 Division Ammunition Column on 2 Dec 1916.  
Gnr.
Ewart
James
34518
C/58
James Ewart’s parents, William and Janet were Scots who had moved to Settle, Yorks, where William was a police officer.  James was born in Settle in 1894 and worked in the woollen mills before the war.  He was serving in C/58 when he was mortally wounded, dying on 9 Oct 1917.  He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery.
Dvr.
Fairclough
Herbert
136990
 
Herbert Fairclough enlisted on 26 Feb 1916 and was serving with 58th Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 15 Oct 1917 as being no longer fit for active service due to wounds he had received.
L/Bdr.
Farley
 
28996
B/58?
L/Bdr Farley was replaced in his position by Ernie Baron (148993) on 4 Apr 1918 and so reverted to the rank of Gunner.
Saddler
Farmer
Peter
91112
B/58
Peter Farmer joined 58th Bde from the Royal Artillery Reinforcement Camp on 4 Apr 1918 and was assigned to B/58.  
Gnr.
Farnham
Harry Leonard
177416
 
Harry Leonard Farnham was born in 1891 in Hastings, Sussex.  He worked as an assistant butcher before the war and enlisted on 21 Sep 1916.   He was serving with 58th Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 21 Dec 1918 as being no longer fit for active service due to sickness.  He married Hannah Murray in 1920 and died in 1961, in Hastings, aged 70.
Cpl.
Faughlan
F
   
Cpl F Faughlan (possibly Gnr John Faughlan, service number 38043) was convicted of drunkenness by a Court Martial held at Zahrieh Camp, Egypt, on 26 Feb 1916 and reduced to the ranks as a result. 
Gnr.
Featherbe
Alfred Herbert
168948
C/58
Alfred Herbert Featherbe was born in 1895 and went to Sidney Street Schools in Folkestone.  Aged 14 he was an errand boy and before he enlisted, he was working at the Reliance Laundry in Folkestone.  He enlisted in Dover and was serving with C/58 when he died of his wounds on 3 Oct 1917.  After he died, one of his comrades wrote to his parents to tell them that he died instantly “with his face to the foe”.  He is buried in Minty Farm Cemetery, Belgium.
Ftr S/Sgt.
Fellgett
Harold Clement
51825
C/58
Harold Clement Fellgett was born in 1888 in Lewisham, the son of George and Hannah Fellgett.  They moved back George’s home town, Ipswich, Suffolk, where George was a grocer’s manager.  Harold was awarded the 1914-15 Star for service in the Egyptian theatre of war with a qualifying date of 14 Jul 1915 – the same date as many of the men who were members of 58th Bde in the early stages of the war.  He was certainly serving in C/58 as a Fitter Staff Sergeant when he was killed in action on 19 Jul 1917.  He is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium. 
Bdr.
Fenton    
Arthur
77072
B/58
Arthur Fenton was from Walsall.  He qualified for the 1914-15 Star due to arriving in the Egyptian theatre of war on 19 Jul 1915.  He was serving in B/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, the award being gazetted on 23 Jul 1919.
Gnr.
Ferdinando
   
D/58
Gnr Ferdinando was instructed to accompany the brigade’s interpreter when the latter was obtaining billets in St Hilaire on 21 Oct 1917.  
Bdr.
Fergusson
   
A/58?
On 24 Jan 1915, Bdr Fergusson was replaced as a Bdr in A/58 by A/Bdr Charles Brown (11171)
Gnr.
Fisher
George
11107
A/58
George Fisher was born in Manchester.  He enlisted in Birmingham probably shortly after war was declared.  He was serving in A/58 when he died of wounds on 27 Apr 1917 and is buried in Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Tréport, France.
Gnr.
Fishstein
David
125225
D/58
David Fishstein was born on 11 Apr 1892 in Whitechapel, London.  In 1911 he was working as a compositor.  He served in the RFA and served in D/58.
Lt.
Fitton
Richard
n/a
 
Richard Fitton was born on 9 Jul 1890 in Shaw, Lancs.  He was commissioned into the RFA as a temporary 2/Lt on 23 Sep 1914 having been a cadet at an Officers Training Corps.  He served with 59th Bde RFA and sailed from Devonport with his brigade on the SS “Haverford” on 2 Jul 1915.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches for his service at Gallipoli and was made a temporary Lt on 1 Jan 1916.  He was awarded the Military Cross; the award being gazetted on 2 Feb 1916.  He was made an acting Captain on 11 Oct 1916 when made second in command of a battery, relinquishing that rank on 20 Apr 1917, because he joined 58th Bde from B/59 on 22 Apr 1917.  He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps some time soon after this and was made a Flying Officer (Observer) on 31 Oct 1917 with seniority from 23 Aug 1917.  He was transferred to the RFC General List at the same time.  He bought Whitehall in Sawtry, Huntingdonshire, in 1924 and lived there with his wife, Lily, and three children.  During the Second World War he served in the Home Guard (1st Bn Huntingdonshire Regt) as an acting Lt. Col.  He died on 17 Oct 1970 and is buried in Shaw, Lancs.
Gnr.
Fleming
Harry
84293
 
Harry Fleming was born in Gibraltar in about 1884.  He enlisted in Elgin, Aberdeenshire.  He was serving in 58th Bde when, on 27 Aug 1915, he died of wounds he received on Gallipoli and was buried at sea.  He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial.
Dvr.
Flowers
George Edward
42713
D/58
Born on 30 Dec 1896, the son of Edward John and Sarah Bertha Flowers, George Edward Flowers was the eldest of their 5 children.  He was born in Fulham and educated at Higher Grade School, William Street, West Kensington.  At 14 he was working as an errand boy while living in Hammersmith, and later as a tailor.  His father died in 1912 and he enlisted in November 1914.  His last letter home to his mother of 9 Mar 1917 was full of optimism: looking forward to an end of the cold and the coming of summer, and, after the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line, he believed the war “will finish about August”.  Three days later, while serving with D/58 at Arras, he was seriously wounded and died of his wounds the following day, 13 Mar 1917.  He is buried in Varennes Military Cemetery.  His commanding officer wrote to his mother saying “He was a great favourite with all, and was missed by everyone, especially by myself, as I always found him cheerful and willing to do whatever was given him, however irksome it may have been, and I shall find it difficult to fill his place.”
A/Bdr.
Forbes    
Donald
1581
A/58
Donald Forbes was a fitter from Newcastle, near Clonmel in County Tipperary.  He enlisted in Birmingham on 29 Aug 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.   He was posted to 3B Reserve Brigade on 9 Sep 1914 and then to A/58 on 12 Feb 1915.  He embarked at Devonport on the HMT “Knight Templar” on 1 Jul 1915, arriving at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He broke out of the ship at Alexandria and was severely reprimanded for doing so by Lt Col Drake.  He then re-embarked at Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  After service at Gallipoli and in Egypt, he sailed from Alexandria on 25 Jun 1916, disembarking in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  He was reprimanded by Maj Hayley for being absent off parade at El Ferdan on 5 May 1916.  He was appointed an A/Bdr on 5 Oct 1916 and was awarded the Military Medal on 8 Dec 1916.  Along with at least 6 other members of the brigade he was sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917 and he was appointed A/Bdr again on 24 Feb 1917 (replacing MacDonald).  He passed as a 1st class signaller by XIII Corps school on 22 Mar 1917.  He was appointed a paid A/Cpl on 13 Oct 1917 and was promoted to Cpl on 29 Nov 1917 (replacing 2893 Edwardes).   He was appointed an Assistant Signalling Instructor on 2 Mar 1918 which earned him an extra 2d pay a day, an appointment he relinquished on 3 Aug 1918 but reassumed on 7 Sep 1918.   He was reprimanded by Lt Col Wray for “when on active service: (1) not complying with an order; (2) neglect of duty in failing properly to maintain signalling communication” on 21 Mar 18.  He became a Signaller Cpl on 22 Aug 1918.  He had a medical examination at St Amand on 9 Mar 1919 and was sent for demobilisation to the Dispersal Centre at Coventry on 23 Mar 19.  He was therefore transferred to Class Z on 21 Apr 1919 and discharged on 31 Mar 1920.  
Dvr.
Ford
John
10653
B/58
John Ford enlisted in Bristol soon after the war was declared.  He was serving in B/58 when he was seriously wounded and died from his wounds.  He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.
Dvr.
Ford
Reginald Hugh
62622
B/58
Reginald Hugh Ford was born in Wickham, Hants in 1894, the son of Richard and Martha Ford.  He was a carter by trade.  He enlisted in Gosport on 11 Jan 1915, aged 20, and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there to 13 Reserve Battery on 15 Jan 1915.  He was posted to B/87 on 12 Feb 1915, but he sailed with 25 Division Ammunition Column from Southampton to Le Havre in September 1915.  He suffered a contusion to his thigh so was laid up in hospital between 19 and 24 Nov 1915.   A month later he had a fractured foot so was admitted to 25 DRS on 28 Dec 1915, and on 3 Mar 1916 he was discharged from No.6 Convalescent Depot at Etaples, to the Base Details Depot.   From there he was posted to 42 Bde RFA (part of 3rd Division) on 23 Mar 1916 and then the following day to the brigade ammunition column.  He was posted to Base on 7 Mar 1917 again from No.6 Convalescent Depot at Etaples and from there to B/58 on 14 Mar 1917.  After another period in hospital, he was discharged to duty from 109 Field Ambulance in June 1917 and suffered another contusion to a leg so was admitted to 25 Field Ambulance on Armistice Day, 11 Nov 1918.  He was demobilised from 58th Bde on 2 Apr 1919 and discharged from the Army due to “impairment since entry into active service” and was awarded a pension due to some disability in his left foot.  He probably died in 1953 aged 58.  
A/Bdr.
Foster
George 
67907
C/58
George Foster was born in South Norwood, London.  He enlisted in Croydon and was serving with C/58 when he was killed on 15 Feb 1917.  He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension.
2/Lt.
Foster
J
   
2/Lt J Foster joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from Base on 2 Apr 1917.  He then joined 58th Bde from 11 DAC on 9 Apr 1917.  
A/Capt.
Foster   
Thomas Charles
n/a
C/58
Thomas Charles Foster was from Jersey and was born on 23 Mar 1879.  He was serving as a BSM and was commissioned as a 2/Lt on 13 Jun 1915.  He first went to France on 24 Oct 1916 with 80th Bde RFA.  He had joined C/58 by 20 Jun 1917 when he was wounded by a shell but returned to duty the next day.  After the death of one of his men, Ernest Inch, on 29 Sep 1917, he wrote to the dead man’s fiancée, Miss R Colliss, to express his sympathy.  He went on 14 days’ leave on 7 Jul 1918, and then on 27 Sep 1918 he made a useful reconnaissance of potential crossings of the canal, along with a Lt Norton.  For this, he was awarded the Military Cross, his citation being “On Sep 27th, 1918, he went forward through continuous shell fire to reconnoitre the possible crossings of the Canal du Nord near Marquion, in order that the brigade might come into action on the east of the cavalry. He returned to headquarters brigade with full information and piloted the brigade safely into action. He afterwards organised the arrangements for the supply of ammunition between the ammunition dump and the guns, and-kept all batteries fully supplied throughout the engagement.  Throughout the day he repeatedly behaved gallantly under fire, disregarding his personal safety and unhesitatingly pursuing his duty for the welfare of the brigade.”  After the Armistice, he went to England on 13 Dec 1918 as the conducting officer for coal miners going home for demobilisation, after which he had 14 days’ leave.  He had a further 14 days’ leave to UK between 31 Mar and 18 Apr 1919.  He and his wife Mary (born 18 Nov 1885) had two children, Stella Mary Elizabeth Foster (born 7 Dec 1915) and Monteith Alastair Charles Foster (born 26 Dec 1922).  They lived in Jersey during the German occupation in World War 2, their address being given as Le Chalet, Havre des Pas, St Helier on their registration cards of 7 Jan 1941.  He died on 8 Apr 1946, leaving his presentation sword to his son Monteith.
Sgt.
Francis
Alfred Charles
68105
D/58
Alfred Charles Francis was born in 1894 in Salcott, Essex.  He was the son of Alfred and Eliza Francis.  He was a pre-war soldier who enlisted in Colchester and went to France with the original BEF as part of 37th (Howitzer) Bde RFA on 23 Aug 1914.  He was serving as a sergeant with D/58 when he was killed in action on 3 Jun 1917.   While recovering from a wound, his former commanding officer, Capt Carlton Roberts wrote back to another officer in D/58 on 25 Jun 1917 regretting the news of his death, saying “I was sorry to hear about Francis.  He was a nice boy and I thought he would be a great success.”  Alfred Francis is buried in La Clytte Military Cemetery.
Capt.
Franklin
Edgar John
6599
C/58
Edgar John Franklin was born in Colchester in 1880 into a military family – his father was a soldier – and he grew up in the married quarters of the barracks in Little Warley, Essex.  He followed his father into the Army when he attested for long service (12 years with the colours) on 25 Oct 1894, aged 14.  He joined the RFA and was posted as a “boy” to 1st Depot.  On 26 Jun 1895 he was posted to 78 Bty and on 10 Oct 1898 he was mustered as gunner and appointed A/Bdr the same day.  He served in the South African campaign in 1899 for which he was awarded the Queen’s and King’s South African Medals. He reverted to Gunner for misconduct on 23 Jun 1900 but was re-appointed A/Bdr the same day, so in effect lost his seniority.  He was promoted Bdr on 4 Dec 1900, to Cpl on 25 Jul 01 and to Sgt on 31 Mar 1902 for gallantry in the field.  On 13 Mar 1905 he re-engaged into the Army at Nasirabad “to complete 21 years” service.  He was promoted to BQMS and posted to 80 Bty on 16 Nov 09.  Svc nr 6599.  He joined the Freemasons while serving in Jubbulpore in 1910 but was back in the UK two years later when he married Elizabeth Alice Hooker at the Baptist Tabernacle, Manor Park, London on 2 Mar 1912.  Later that year he was posted to No.2 Depot on 12 Dec 1912, which was renamed as No.5 Depot on 1 Aug 1913 during a reorganisation.  A few weeks after the war broke out, he was commissioned as a 2/Lt on 26 Sept 1914.   He had joined 58 Bde by early 1915 and was a Temporary Lt while acting as the brigade’s adjutant.  He was promoted to Lt (while already acting as a Captain) on 9 Jun 1915.  He sailed on SS “Knight Templar” from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915 as the commander of C/58, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  Unusually for a battery, he kept a brief War Diary for C/58 between 29 Jun and 29 Oct 1915.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches on 12 July 1916 for distinguished and gallant service during the period of Gen Charles Munro’s command of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.  When Maj Hutton joined A/58 as the new battery commander in late July 1916, he praised Capt Franklin as a “good fellow”.  He was granted 10 days’ leave on 27 Oct 1916.  He returned from a subsequent period of leave on 19 Jan 1917, resuming command of C/58 two days later.  He was made an acting Major on 25 Feb 1917 due to his position as a battery commander.  He was wounded in action on 9 Apr 17 with shrapnel wounds to his left leg.  He was admitted to 96 Field Ambulance and from there was transferred to 3 General Hospital.  He relinquished the rank of acting Major due to being evacuated.  From 3 General Hospital he boarded the “Hospital Ship” Lanfranc for transfer back to the UK, but on 17 Apr 1917 a German U Boat torpedoed and sank HMHS “Lanfranc” and Capt Franklin was missing, believed drowned.  He is commemorated on Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton. 
Dvr.
Franklin
Herbert
10922
B/58
At 14, Herbert Franklin was working as a machinist in a cycle factory.  He had been born in Coventry in about 1895 and enlisted alongside his brother Thomas into the RFA in Nuneaton on 5 Sep 1914.  He claimed to be 19, like his brother, but was in fact only 17.  He was working as a gear cutter (for motors) at the time.  He was posted initially as a Driver to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there to B/58 on 10 Sep 1914.  He was confined to barracks for 7 days by Maj Meyricke for being absent without leave from 12pm on 26 Feb to 9.55pm on 28 Feb 1915.  He was punished again by Maj Meyricke for neglecting to obey an order while at Milford Camp on 15 May 1915.  He went abroad with the brigade on 1 Jul 1915.  Probably after illness or minor injury while serving in Egypt or Gallipoli, he was posted to 146 Bde Ammunition Column (part of 28 Division) in Egypt on 21 Nov 1915 which was sent to Salonika a couple of months later.  He was posted to 22 Bty on 14 Apr 1917, and then on 29 May 1917 was spotted by a mounted military policeman acting in breach of Salonika Standing Order No.3 (Trotting Transport Horses) for which he was awarded 3 days’ Field Punishment No.2.  He ended the war in 18 Division Ammunition Column and went to the Dispersal Centre at Fovant for demobilisation in May 1919.
Dvr.
Franklin
Thomas Reeves
10923
B/58
Born in 1894, Thomas Reeves Franklin was a tobacconist’s assistant from Coventry when he was aged 16.  As a 19 year-old shop assistant, he enlisted in Nuneaton on 5 Sep 1914 alongside his younger brother Herbert.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and a few days later on 10 Sep 1915 to 185 Bty, which became B/58.  He married Catherine Cunningham in Leeds Registry Office on 26 Sep 1914, and their son, Reginald, was born on 4 Apr 1915.  He was posted to HQ 58 Bde on 7 Oct 1915.  After the Armistice, he was sent to Chiseldon Dispersal Centre on 18 Feb 1919 while serving with 11 Division and was transferred to Class Z on 19 Mar 1919.  He died in 1980, in Coventry, aged 85.
Sgt.
Franklin    
Thomas
49159
D/58
Sgt Thomas Franklin was from Tottenham, London.  He was serving in D/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 3 Jun 1919.  
2/Lt.
Frazer
D?
n/a
 
2/Lt Frazer joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from Base on 9 Jul 1917 and a few days later was posted on 13 Jul 1917 to 58 Bde.
2/Lt.
French
Cecil Charles
n/a
C/58
Cecil Charles French was born in Poplar, London, on 29 Jan 1890, the son of William George and Helen Ann French.  He was a civil servant, working as a clerk, initially in the Board of Trade from about 1905 and then from about 1909 in the Labour Exchange.  He joined the RFA Territorial Force on 14 Jul 1908, aged 18, for a period of 4 years’ service.  He joined 1st Essex Battery in 2nd East Anglian Bde, RFA, and attended their annual camps at Lydd, Kent, leaving at the end of his service on 13 Jul 1912.    He enlisted into the RFA as a driver on 26 Nov 1914 in Stratford, London, and was assigned service number 46338.  He was posted initially to No.6 depot at Glasgow and from there to A/102 Bde on 19 Dec 1914.  He was promoted to Corporal on 1 Jan 1915.  He was serving with A/102 in Canterbury when he applied for a temporary commission.  He was commissioned into the Special Reserve of Officers as a 2/Lt on probation on 19 May 1915.  On 7 Oct 1915, he was reported as about to arrive from Mudros to join 58th Bde while they were at Gallipoli.  He passed his probation and so was confirmed in rank on 9 Feb 1916.  On 20 Nov 1916 he was serving in C/58 when he was granted 10 days leave, returning from leave on 7 Dec 1916.  However, shortly afterwards, on 17 Jan 1917, Cecil French left 58 Bde to transfer to the Royal Flying Corps’ Kite Balloon Section and he subsequently joined the RAF after its formation in 1918.  He was diagnosed with neurasthenia dating from 8 Mar 1918 and so spent 3 months n hospital followed by 2 months of leave after which he returned to hospital.  A Medical Board held at the RFC Auxiliary Hospital, Shirley Park, Croydon, on 20 Sep 1918 found that he was still suffering from neurasthenia and would get giddy so decided he was no longer fit for any service.  He was awarded a Silver War Badge on 10 Dec 1918.  He returned to living in Manor Park, London, and obviously recovered to at least some extent because on 16 Dec 1920 he wrote to the War Office enquiring whether he was still a member of the Armed Forces and if so whether he could be appointed to a commission in the new Territorial Force (TF).  He was informed he had no further obligation of military service but given instructions as to what to do if he did want to join the TF.  He died in Bournemouth in 1975, aged 85.  
Bdr.
French
Edward John
97362
C/58
Edward John French was the son of Edward and Emma French.  He was serving in C/58 when he died of wounds on 27 Jul 1917, aged 23.    He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.  
Sgt.
Fry
   
B/58?
Sgt Fry witnessed a misdemeanour by Cpl Ernie Baron (148993) when the latter “made an improper reply to an NCO” on 18 Jan 1918.  
Cpl.
Fryer
Edgar E
10823
C/58
Cpl Edgar E Fryer was sent to 5th Army Artillery School to go on a gunnery course on 15 Feb 1917.  He ended the war as a Sgt.
Gnr.
Fuller
Henry John
97957
 
Henry John Fuller was born in Bacton, Suffolk.  He enlisted in Bury St Edmonds, Suffolk, and was serving with 58th Bde when he died on Malta on 13 Dec 1915.  He is buried in Pietà Military Cemetery.
BSM
Fuller   
Jonathon
28646
C/58
Born in Gorleston, Norfolk in 1878, Jonathan Fuller enlisted in the militia on 26 Apr 1898, serving in the Prince of Wales Own Norfolk Artillery.   He was 19 years old at the time and worked as a labourer.  However, 3 months later he enlisted in the Army on 5 July 1898, joining the RFA and so was posted initially to No.2 Depot in the Eastern Division RA.  In 1909 he was a corporal serving with 18th Battery in Nowshera, India [now Pakistan] and decided to re-enlist to serve the full 31 years with the colours.  He was still with 18th Bty when he was promoted to Sgt on 31 Oct 1914 but returned to the UK shortly afterwards with his unit.  He went to France on 15 Jan 1915, but received a gunshot wound to his leg on 8 May 1915, so went to 4 General Hospital and was then evacuated back to the UK on 15 May 1915.  He stayed in Cambridge Hospital, Aldershot, between 16 May and 21 Aug 1915.  He was posted to C/181 Bde on 17 Oct 1915, being appointed Acting BSM on 26 Oct 1915 and being confirmed in rank the same day.  He went back to France on 1 Jun 1916 and was posted to Base on 9 Oct 1916 and from there to No.2 Section 11 Division Ammunition Column on 12 Feb 1917.  He joined C/58 as their BSM on 11 Apr 1917.    He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal which was gazetted on 3 Jun 1918 “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  This W.O. has served throughout the operations with his battery, and by his example, hard work, and untiring energy has maintained a high standard of efficiency amongst the NCOs and men.  In particular he rendered valuable service during two months’ heavy fighting, when there were many casualties to the officers of the battery.”  He was gassed on the final day of the war, 11 Nov 1918.  After the war, he was sent to No.1 Dispersal Unit at North Camp, Ripon on 4 Jul 1919 and discharged on 1 Aug 1919.  He died in 1922, aged 43, in Gorleston and was buried in Great Yarmouth.  
Cpl.
Gadsby
Thomas
91064
B/58
Thomas Gadsby was born in Burton-upon-Trent in about 1885.  He was serving in B/58 and manning one of its guns on 29 Oct 1916, when a shell from a German 5.9″ howitzer scored a direct hit on the gun.  He was badly wounded, dying a little later, aged 30, while three other members of the gun crew, Gnr Frederick Leadbeater (11104), Gnr David Lloyd (99731) and Gnr Sylvester McCreath (104730), were killed instantly.  He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.  
Gnr.
Gall
Norman W 
167933
 
Norman Gall was born in about 1893 in Fetteresso, Kincardineshire, to Adam W and Mary Jane Gall.  By 1911 the family had moved to Northumberland where Norman worked as a butcher.  He enlisted in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and died of wounds on 11 Aug 1918.  He is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, France.
2/Lt.
Gardner
J
n/a
A/58
2/Lt J Gardner was attached to A/58 on 14 Feb 1918.  He had previously been serving with the 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC).  But less than a week later he was posted to join 11 Division’s Trench Mortar batteries and so left A/58 on 20 Feb 1918.  The trench mortar batteries were absorbed into 11 DAC on 8 Feb 1919, so 2/Lt Gardner was back within 11 DAC when he was sent back to the UK for demobilisation on 21 Apr 1919.
Bdr.
Garlick    
Thomas Edmund
12643
A/58
Thomas Edmund Garlick was born in Blyth, Notts, on 5 Apr 1892.  He worked as a hotel porter in Doncaster in 1911 but was working as a drayman when he enlisted on 30 Aug 1914 in Doncaster aged 22.  He was sent initially to No.2 Depot, Preston and posted from there to 212 Bty and then to 278 Bty, which became B/89 Bde. He suffered a contusion to his shoulder in Apr 1915 while training in the UK and was appointed A/Bdr on 10 Jul 1915.  He served in France between 7 Jul and 3 Nov 1915, during which time, on 3 Sep 1915, B/89 was renumbered as B/130 Howitzer Bde.  He was promoted to Bdr on 15 Oct 1915.  From France he went to Egypt, arriving on about 12 Nov 1915, where he was admitted to 15 General Hospital in Alexandria with venereal disease on 30 Nov 1915.  He was severely reprimanded for being in Alexandria town without a pass on 27 Mar 1916.  He joined A/58 Bde at El Ferdan on 5 Apr 1916 (his 24th birthday) having been posted to them from Base Depot Sidi Bishr.  With 58th Bde, he returned to France in July 1916 and was awarded the Military Medal for “bravery in the field”, the award being gazetted on 6 Jan 1917.  He returned from sick leave on 14 Feb 1917 but two months later, on 9 Apr 1917, he was wounded in his left thigh by a gunshot wound which fractured his femur.  After treatment at 44 Field Ambulance he was sent to 11th Stationary Hospital in Rouen and was then evacuated to the UK on Hospital Ship “Western Australia”.   He was given a surgical boot and transferred to King George Hospital, London, on 3 Jun 1917.  The injury was described as permanent and made him unfit for military service, so he was discharged on 3 Apr 1918, awarded a Silver War Badge and paid a pension of 30 shillings a week for 4 weeks then 24 shillings for 48 weeks.  He was described as of good character and “steady, sober and reliable”.   After the war he returned to working as a hotel porter, working in the Abbey Court Hotel, 15 Netherhall Gardens, Hampstead, London, NW3.  On 7 Jul 1919 he married Phoebe Valerie Kent.  They had four daughters and a son.   In 1960, the old wound to his leg resulted in the need to have the leg amputated.  Thomas passed away in 1975, aged 83.
Dvr.
Garvey
George
104728
D/58
George Garvey came from Liverpool.  He was serving in D/58 when, on 23 Aug 1918 he was helping get a wagon out of a ditch.  An enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on the party seeking to get it out.  Nine of the group, including George, were killed, one more later dying of wounds.  George was 37 when he died and he is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension.
Gnr.
Garwood
A E G
 
C/58
Gunner A E G Garwood joined C/58 in March 1918.
Gnr.
Gay
George Alfred Hewitt
141494
C/58
George Alfred Hewitt Gay was born in Bristol in 1893.  He was the youngest of Aaron & Maria Gay’s children.  In 1911 the family were resident at 1 Harding Barton, Bethel Road, St. George, Bristol.  Aaron, Maria and all three of their children, including George, were boot makers.  He enlisted in the Army and was serving with C/58 when he was killed in action on 25 Aug 1917, aged 24.  He is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery.
Gnr.
Gebbie
Robert
92496
A/58
Robert Gebbie from Darvel, Ayrshire, enlisted in the Territorial Force for a period of 4 years’ service when he was aged 17, in Kilmarnock on 6 Mar 1911.  In civilian life he worked as a compositor and he joined the 1/2nd Ayrshire Battery of the 1/2nd Lowland Bde RFA, was assigned service number 2216, and attended their annual camps.  On 24 Sep 1914, he agreed to volunteer to serve overseas.  On 9 Jun 1915 he sailed from Devonport, arriving in Port Said, Egypt with his unit on 23 Jun 1915.  On 6 Feb 1916 he went to the Base Depot in Alexandria ready to go back to the UK having completed his 4 years’ service, sailing on HMT Tunisian on 22 Mar 1916.   He was discharged on 4 Apr 1916.   He must have enlisted into the regular Army shortly afterwards because he was serving with A/58 seven months later when he was killed in action on 1 Nov 1916.  He is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery. 
Gnr.
Gibbs
David
10714
C/58
David Gibbs was the son of Charles and Sarah Ann Gibbs of Nuneaton, Warks.  He enlisted into the RFA shortly after war was declared and went abroad to Egypt with his unit in July 1915.   He must have been evacuated back to the UK due to illness or wounds because he died in Liverpool Highfield Hospital, aged 19, on 14 Oct 1915.  He is buried in Liverpool (Kirkdale) Cemetery.  
Gnr.
Gill
Lithgow
117458
 
Lithgow Gill was born in 1891 in Fylde, Lancs, to John and Jennie Gill.  He enlisted on 1 Dec 1915.  He was serving with 58th Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 21 Feb 1919 due to no longer being fit for military service on account of wounds he had received.  He died in 1962 in Blackpool, Lancs, aged 71.  
Gnr.
Gill
Noah
158564
C/58
Noah Gill was born 1879 in Wakefield, Yorks, the son of Henry and Eliza Gill.   He married Amelia Siddall on 27 Apr 1901 in Wakefield while working as a warehouseman at the time.  They had two daughters, Myra and Marjorie.  He was subsequently an agent and collector for the Provident Clothing and Supply Co.  He enlisted on 1 Dec 1915 and joined 1 Reserve Bde.  He was posted to France, arriving there on 1 Dec 1916.  He was posted to 2 Division Ammunition Column on 20 Dec 1916, then on 26 Jan 1917 he was posted to 34 Bde Ammunition Column.  He was admitted to 4 Australian DRS with an abscess on his buttock and was transferred to 2 Australian DRS the following day before being evacuated to the UK on Hospital Ship Lanfranc on 15 Mar 1917 and was admitted the following day to the Welsh Hospital Netley with burns to the right side of his face and his hands caused by petrol.  After being in 5C Reserve Bde and then at the Command Depot at Ripon, he was posted to C/58 on 26 Oct 1917.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK via Boulogne (with rations) between 21 Oct and 4 Nov 1918.  He was sent to Clipstone Dispersal Centre ready for demobilisation on 22 May 1919.   
Gnr.
Gill
Richard
16574
 
Richard Gill was from Salford and he enlisted on 5 Apr 1915.   He had been serving with 58th Bde when he was discharged on 24 Apr 1919 while at the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon as no longer being fit for active service due to wounds he had received, so he was awarded a Silver War Badge.
Maj.
Gilmore 
A E
n/a
 
Maj A E Gilmore returned from leave to rejoin 58th Bde on 5 Oct 1917.  Two months later, on 5 Dec 1917, he took a group of men to fetch remounts.  He went on leave to England on 7 Jan 1918 and was struck off the strength of the Brigade on 16 Feb 1918 following a medical board.  
2/Lt.
Glossop
Charles
n/a
A/58
Born on 17 Jul 1884 in Arundel, Sussex, Charles Glossop was a Corporal in C Battery, RHA in 1911.  He was based at Christchurch Barracks, Christchurch, Hants and had been married to Agnes Mary Glossop for less than a year.  He was subsequently promoted to Sgt (service number 28437) and was serving in Q Battery RHA when he went to France on 11 Nov 1914.  He was subsequently promoted to BSM and then was commissioned “for service in the field” on 16 May 1916.  He was promoted to Lt on 26 Nov 1917 and was awarded the Military Cross (gazetted on 17 Dec 1917) “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in volunteering to go out beyond our outposts and along our most advanced positions and bringing back the first definite information as to our line, all under very heavy sniping fire. Later, when gassed, he refused to leave the battery, but sent others away who had been wounded and gassed. Another time he did excellent work as forward observation officer, getting back information by visual under machine-gun fire from both flanks and from aeroplanes.”   It is not clear how soon after he was commissioned that he joined 58th Bde, but he was certainly a member of the unit by 5 Oct 1917 when he returned.  He had another two weeks’ leave between 27 Jan and 13 Feb 1918 but was gassed soon after on 9 Apr 1918 along with many others.  He reported to the Casualty Clearing Station and was struck off the strength of 58th Bde on 14 Apr 1918 having been “wounded gas”.   After the war he served in the British Military Mission to South Russia as part of the doomed Allied support for the White Russians.  He was made a temporary Captain “while acting as an instructor” from 4 Aug 1919, returning to be a Lt on ceasing to act as an instructor on 19 Jul 1920.  For this service he received a bar to his Military Cross: “For conspicuous gallantry near Boutourlinovka, on 2nd October, 1919, when with the 2nd Battery, Don Horse Artillery Division, accompanied only by an interpreter, he rushed an enemy machine gun which was hindering the advance, and captured the gun and crew, thus enabling the advance to continue. Capt. Glossop has on other occasions shown marked gallantly and enterprise.”  He was placed on the half-pay list on 17 Oct 1920 and retired on retired pay on 16 Nov 1920.   On his 50th birthday, 17 Jul 1934, he reached the age when he was no longer liable to recall and so ceased to belong to the Reserve of Officers.  
Gnr.
Goldie
Robert
142908
D/58
Robert Goldie was born in Cockpen, Midlothian, in about 1896.  His parents were William W and Helen C Goldie.  He enlisted in Edinburgh and he was serving in D/58 on 23 Aug 1918 when he was helping get a wagon out of a ditch.  An enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on the party seeking to get it out, killing nine of them, including Robert, with a tenth later dying of wounds.  He is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension.
Gnr.
Goodhind
Joseph Henry
10663
A/58
Joseph Henry Goodhind was born on 25 Aug 1890 in Bristol to Joseph and Susan Goodhind and was baptised on 14 Sep 1890 in St Philip and St Jacob’s Church, Bristol.  Before the war he was living with his parents and sister, Mary Jane Goodhind, in 1 Tower St, Temple, Bristol, while working as a tinsmith in T S Hall’s factory.  On 1 Sep 1914, he enlisted into the RFA at Bristol Recruitment Office No.2 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there, he was posted to 184 Bty, which became A/58, on 2 Sep 1914.  During training he was confined to barracks for 3 days by Maj Crozier for being absent from roll call on 27 Jan 1915.  He appears to have served with A/58 while they were at Gallipoli, but must have left the brigade, most likely due to illness, in late 1915 or early 1916 because on 2 Apr 1916 he was posted to Base.  This was probably the Base Depot   in Egypt since records imply that he stayed in the Mediterranean war theatre for the rest of his service.  Where he served for the following year is unclear, but on 29 Oct 1917 he was posted to A/54 Bde which had recently arrived in Egypt on its way to Palestine.  He was again posted to Base on 21 Jul 1918, and from there to an unidentifiable unit on 26 Jul 1918 and then to 130 Bde Ammunition Column at Salonika on 15 Nov 1918, leaving on 20 Dec 1918 to return to the UK, arriving there on 30 Dec 1918.  He was sent to Kitchener Military Hospital, Brighton to recuperate from illnesses that he had caught on active service and was awarded a pension of 5 shillings 6d a week from 23 May 1919 due to debility from malaria and dysentery contracted during his service.  He was formally demobbed on 31 Mar 1920 and his character was described as “v good”.   After the war, he married Edith Emily Welch in December 1921 (they had one son, Bertram John Goodhind) and he died in Bristol in 1974, aged 83.  
Sgt.
Gorman  
John
79013
A/58
John Gorman was from Preston, Lancs.  He was serving with A/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal, which was gazetted on 13 Jun 1919.  
Dvr.
Goulding
Matthew
4773
C/58
Matthew Goulding was born in St George’s, Lancs.  He enlisted in Wigan and was serving with C/58 when he died on 15 Aug 1917 of wounds he had received.  He is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.
Bdr.
Grafton
   
A/58
Bdr Grafton successfully completed a signalling course on 22 Mar 1917 at the XIII Corps school and was certified as a 1st class signaller.
2/Lt.
Graham
W T
n/a
C/58
2/Lt Graham was serving with 11 Division Ammunition Column when he was assigned to C/58 on 19 Jul 1917.  Along with Capt. Bird, he was selected to go to Royal Artillery V Corps on 2 Dec 1917, so left the brigade the following day and was struck off its strength.   
2/Lt.
Graham-Clarke
Leonard Warre
n/a
 
Leonard Warre Graham-Clarke was born in 1872 in Frocester, Glos, to Leonard John and Flora Eliza Graham-Clarke.  He lived at the Manor House in the village.  In 1905 when returning to the UK from Natal, South Africa, his profession was given as “Mounted Police”.  The following year he had his banns read to marry Evelyn Mary Davies of Stonehouse, Glos.  He was living in Amblangoda, Ceylon [Sri Lanka] at the time.  He, his brother and a number of others were each bequeathed £500 in the will of a Mrs Louisa Darell Brown in 1912.  On 24 Jul 1916 he was commissioned into the Reserve Cavalry as a temporary 2/Lt having been a cadet and was confirmed in that rank on 21 Dec 1916.   He was attached to the RFA and was serving with 58th Bde when he applied to resign his commission on 12 May 1917 and relinquished his commission on 25 May 1917, being granted the honorary rank of 2/Lt.   After the war, his wife Evelyn Mary Jenner Clarke petitioned in 1921 for “restitution of conjugal rights” but in 1923 filed for divorce. He re-married and in 1927 he returned from a trip to Madeira with his second wife May Lindsay Graham-Clarke.  At the time he was described as a landowner, living in Rhyadaer, Wales.  He died in Devon in 1950, aged 78.  
Gnr.
Gray
Arthur Edward
3681
C/58
Arthur Edward Gray was absent from his home town of Wandsworth and serving with C/58 so was entitled to a vote by proxy in elections. 
Dvr.
Gray
William
51498
B/58
William Gray was born in Liverpool.  He enlisted in Preston and was serving in B/58 when he died on 8 Aug 1917 of wounds he had received.  He is buried in Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, Belgium.
 
Grieves 
B   
   
B Grieves had worked as a “helper” in the south bank of Smith’s Dock Company Ltd, North Shields before he enlisted and joined 58 Bde.
Fitter
Griffin
David
79407
B/58
Born in 1895 in Chalford, Glos, David Griffin was the son of Francis (Frank) Edward and Kate Elizabeth Griffin.  Before the war he worked as a turner and fitter at the JES Motor Works, Worcester Street, Gloucester, whose owner described him as competent and trustworthy.   He enlisted in Bristol on 12 Aug 1914 claiming to be 21 years old, though he was in fact 18 or 19.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and then on 4 Feb 1915 to B/78 at Swanage as a fitter.  Two weeks later he went absent without leave for 10 days.  He was then posted to 68 Bde Ammunition Column at Bulford on 20 Mar 1915.  He sailed from Avonmouth on 17 Jun 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 5 Jul 1915.  He re-embarked at Alexandria on 11 Oct 1915, arriving at Salonika on 15 Oct 1915.  He was admitted to 4 Canadian General Hospital due to an injury to his legs on 17 Dec 1915.  Soon after this he caught influenza on 27 Dec 1915 and so he was sent on Hospital Ship “Dunluce Castle” to Malta, where he was admitted to St David’s Hospital, Malta on 27 Jan 1916.  He was transferred to All Saints Convalescent Camp, Malta, on 17 Mar 1916.  He was posted to the Base Depot at Sidi Bishr in Egypt and from there he was posted to B/58 on 5 Apr 1916.  From Egypt he would have travelled with 58th Bde to France in July 1916.  He was killed in action on 25 Oct 1916 aged 21 and he is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery.  
Maj.
Griffin      
Peter Gerald
n/a
OIC D/58
Peter Gerald Griffin was born on 29 Jun 1878 in Altavilla, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick.  Between October 1895 and 1898 he served as an officer in the Limerick City Artillery (Militia), first as a Lt then as a temporary Capt.  He then moved to India and served in the Northern Bengal Mounted Rifles between 1898 and 1909.  While in India he married Cara Lillian Ponsonby on 3 Jan 1907, they had 5 children.  He left the military when he left India in 1909 and became a gentleman farmer.  On 27 Aug 1914 he applied for a Commission in the Special Reserve and was appointed a Capt. in the RFA.   He served in Gallipoli and then “the desert East of Suez Canal”.  On 29 Nov 1916, Maj Griffin took over command of D/58, probably on transfer from A/133 when it was split up and its personnel distributed across 58th Bde.   He returned from leave on 7 Jan 1917 and took over temporary command of the brigade from Maj Hutton.  He again took over command of the brigade on 27 Jan 1917 when Lt Col Winter went on a special mission.  On 13 Feb 1917 he took over command of C/58 on 13 Feb 1917 and was officially appointed Lt Col Winter’s replacement whenever Winter was away.  He contracted bronchitis following influenza and left 58th Bde on 2 Mar 1917 and sailed on 12 Mar 1917 on “Princess Elizabeth” from Boulogne, arriving at Dover same day, and was admitted to the Russian Hospital, London.  On 17 Apr 1917 he was posted to 65 Division Artillery in Kildare, Ireland, because he was only fit for light duties.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the King’s Birthday Honours on 5 Jun 1917, being described as “late C/58”.  He was twice Mentioned in Dispatches, on 4 Jan 1917 and on 18 May 1917.  After the war he was serving in 140 Bty, 16 Bde, RFA in Palestine when he died of heart failure while playing polo on 26 Mar 1921, aged 43.  He was pronounced dead in Palestine General Hospital Ludd.  At the time, his wife Cara was living in the old family home of Altavilla and in 1927 she applied for a Kitchener Scholarship for their son; by that point she was living in Dollar, Clackmannanshire.
2/Lt.
Griffiths
E
n/a
D/58
2/Lt E Griffiths acted as D/58’s Forward Observation Officer on 4 Oct 1917 and was then a candidate for 11 Division’s Commander Royal Artillery’s “examination of 2/Lts for promotion (1st sitting)” on 16 Dec 1917.    He went on leave, returning on 14 Feb 1918.  On 11 May 1918 he and 16 “other ranks” went to 1 Army Royal Artillery Rest Camp for a week.  He attended a 2 day camouflage course at Wimereux and so was absent from the brigade between 28 Jul and 3 Aug 1918.  Then on 26 Aug 1918, soon after the “100 days” began, he was part of a mobile battery which 58th Bde assembled.  He returned to the UK ready for demobilisation on 27 Jan 1919.  
Bdr.
Griffiths
   
A/58?
Bdr Griffiths was one of the witnesses to Gnr George McGuire (93021) being absent overnight on 5 Jun 1915 at Milford Camp.
Lt.
Grinley
Geoffrey Chapman
n/a
C/58
Geoffrey Chapman Grinley was born on 30 Nov 1888 in Bromley, Kent.  He joined the territorial cavalry regiment, 2/County of London Yeomanry, on 19 Jun 1908, aged 22, and was given service number 384.  Five years later he was a Sgt in the regiment.  After war was declared, he applied for a temporary commission on 8 Oct 1914, and was commissioned into the RFA on 25 Jan 1915.  He was serving with 58 Bde by 1 Jul 1915 when he embarked on SS “Knight Templar” at Devonport with the brigade, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He was granted the temporary rank of Lt on 1 Jul 1916.  Lt Grinley returned to 58 Bde from leave on 26 Oct 1916.  He rejoined B/58 on 21 Jan 1917.  Capt Grinley went on 10 days leave on 14 Feb 1917 “on special grounds”, returning on 27 Feb 17. He was promoted to A/Maj to command B/58 from 18 Apr 1917, but only eight days later he received a flesh wound on 26 Apr 1917 from an enemy 4.2″ high explosive shell on his way back from an observation post with 2/Lt Stanley Taylor (also of B/58) who was similarly wounded.  They were both evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station.  He had suffered a ‘gunshot wound’ near Ecoust, France, and was admitted to 2/2 West Riding Field Ambulance.  As a result, he relinquished his temporary rank of Major on ceasing to command a 6 gun battery on 28 Apr 1917.  He was transferred to England on Hospital Ship “Western Australia” on 15 May 1917.  In a letter of 25 Jun 1917, Capt Roberts, formerly of D/58, said that he had recently heard from Grinley who was recuperating in Cornwall and should be fit again soon.  On 19 Sep 1917 he married Eleanor Gertrude Baxter in Chiddingfold, Surrey.  His home address at the time was given as The Cottage, Mayfield Rd, Sutton.  He was finally declared fit on 17 Dec 1918 and was reinstated as an A/Major and was posted to 342 Bde at Brooke, Norfolk.  In 1930 he was living at Claremont, Farnborough, and two years later he sailed to Lisbon, being described as an insurance official.  He died in 1974.
Dvr.
Guise
William Harold
11139
A/58
William Harold Guise was born in Droitwich, Worcs, on 12 Sep 1889.  In 1911 he was working as a domestic groom in Snelston, Ashbourne, Derbyshire.  He was still working as a groom three years later (though perhaps not still in Snelston) when he enlisted in Rugby on 4 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 184 Bty on 5 Sep 1914, which became A/58.  His subsequent service becomes hard to determine.  He stayed in the Mediterranean theatre of war from 2 Jul 1915 for 1 year and 90 days, so probably sailed with A/58 to Egypt and Gallipoli before at some point being transferred to another unit.  He returned to the UK in September 1916 and then spent at least two spells in France (one of which began on 25 Jun 1917) as well as at some point being posted to P Battery, No.7 Depot and 51st Reserve Battery at Charlton Park, Wilts.  He left the Army in 1919 and four years later he married Edith Annie Priddey in 1923 in Droitwich and died, aged 90, also in Droitwich in 1980.
Sgt.
Gunson
John Charles
20605
C/58
John Charles Gunson was born on 22 Feb 1895 in Walkley, near Sheffield, Yorks, to Sidney and Elizabeth Gunson.  He was working as a groom when he enlisted aged 19 in Sheffield on 5 Sep 1914 and was posted initially to No.1 Depot, Newcastle.  From there he was posted to 60 Bde RFA Ammunition Column and was transferred from there to the new D/60 on 22 Jan 1915.  He was appointed A/Bdr on 26 Jun 1915 and confirmed in rank on 15 Oct 1915.  Along with the rest of his battery he was posted to form the new C/133 on 26 Apr 1916.  On 23 Mar 1917 he was serving as a Cpl in C/58 when he neglected some duty so was reprimanded by his battery commander, Capt Franklin the following day. He was appointed A/Sgt in January 1918 and replaced as Cpl by Albert Johnson.  Later that year he was admitted to 1st Australian General Hospital and was sent then to a camp in Boulogne, but subsequently appeared to have returned to C/58.  He was demobilised at the North Camp, Ripon, on 26 Mar 1919.  In 1939 he was living with his wife Gladys and their children in Sheffield.  John was working as a contractor for Public Works at the time.  He died in 1961.
Gnr.
Hadfield
Fred
214520
 
Fred Hadfield enlisted on 3 Mar 1917 when he was about 19 years old.  He was serving with 58 Bde two years later when he was discharged from the Army on 30 May 1919 aged 21 as being no longer fit for military service due to wounds received. 
Dvr.
Hall
William George
170618
A/58
William George Hall was a farm labourer from Wisbech, Cambs.  On 3 Jan 1914, he married Elizabeth May Green-Smith in Lincoln.  He attested on 5 Jun 1916 in Wisbech aged 25 while living at 2 Whitby St, Wisbech.  He was mobilised 19 Sep 1916 and was posted to 4C Reserve Bde on 22 Sep 1916.  He was posted to France on 3 Jan 1917 and joined A/58.  Six months later he was severely wounded, receiving wounds in his legs, face, chest and abdomen and so was admitted to 4 General Hospital on 15 Jul 1917 and needed to have his right leg amputated.  He attended a review of his disability at Charterhouse Military Hospital, London EC1, and was discharged from the Army on 4 Oct 1918, being described as being of very good character.  He was awarded a pension starting the following day of 27/6 a week, which would then drop to 22/ on 7 Jan 1919 and would then be reviewed after 26 weeks. 
Gnr.
Hambleton
Philip Edward
12218
C/58
Philip Edward Hambleton was born in in 1892 in Cadoxton, Barry, Glam, to Charles and Angelina Hambleton.  His father was a butcher.  In 1911, Philip worked as a biller at the New Theatre Royal in Barry   He enlisted early in the war and was serving with C/58 in Gallipoli when he was wounded and evacuated to Malta.  He died there on 8 Dec 1915 and is buried in the Pietà Military Cemetery.  Two of his brothers also served in the Army, one also being killed, Cpl Sydney Charles Hambleton of 16th Welsh (Cardiff City) battalion who died in July 1916, while the other, Frederick served with the Welsh Guards and survived.
Dvr.
Hannah
Robert
109016
 
Robert Hannah was serving with 58 Bde when the absent voters list for Dundee was compiled in the autumn of 1918.  His home address was 50 Hill St, Dundee.
Gnr.
Hardiman
Thomas George 
10546
C/58
Thomas George Hardiman was born in Hastings, Sussex, in 1893 to Stephen and Mary Hardiman.  In 1901 the family had moved to Bedworth, Warks, to live with Thomas’s uncle Joseph Hardiman who ran the “Haunch of Venison” public House on the High St in Bedworth.  Thomas’s father Stephen worked as a coachman.  In 1911 Thomas was still in Bedworth and was working as a miner (filler).  He enlisted in Coventry soon after war was declared, served in the Mediterranean theatre of war – probably at Gallipoli with 58 Bde – and was serving in C/58 when he was killed in action on 21 Oct 1916.  He is buried in Serre Road Cemetery No.2, Somme, France.  
Gnr.
Hardman
Albert
3243
Bde HQ
Albert Hardman was living in 4, Alvin St, Gloucester, when he enlisted on 7 Jun 1915 in Gloucester into the Territorial Force and joined the yeomanry regiment, the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars as a private with service number 3078.   He was appointed an unpaid L/Cpl on 16 Sep 1915.  His wife was awarded a separation allowance of 14/5 and in addition he allotted 3/6 of his pay to her.  On 14 Mar 1916, he transferred to the RFA as a gunner, probably joining 1st South Midland (Gloucestershire) Bde.  At some point he agreed to serve overseas and so on 9 Aug 1916 he joined 1 Territorial Base Depot, Rouen.  From there he was posted to the base depot in Le Havre on 7 Oct 1916 and shortly afterwards on 18 Oct 1916 he was posted to 11 Division Artillery.  He was allocated to HQ 58 Bde on 24 Oct 1916 but was mortally wounded by gunshot wounds in his right side the next day, dying later that same day at 9 Casualty Clearing Station.  He is buried in Contay British Cemetery, France.  His widow, Louisa, and their child lived at 23 Norfolk St, Gloucester, but moved in about 1918 to 85 Theresa St, Gloucester.  She was awarded a widow’s pension of 18/9 with effect from 14 May 1917.  
Cpl.
Hardy  
Arthur
47292
B/58
Arthur Hardy was the son of Mrs Emma Hardy of Leicester.  He was born in about 1884.  He was serving with B/58 on 2 Jan 1917 when he was awarded the Military Medal (award gazetted on 19 Feb 1917).  He was awarded a bar to his Military Medal on 2 Nov 1917 by which point he had been promoted to Sgt, but a month later while serving with 504 Bty in 65 Bde RFA he was killed in action on 5 Dec 1917, aged 33.  He is buried at Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel-le-Grand. 
Bdr.
Hargist
   
B/58?
Bdr Hargist was one of the witnesses to Dvr Ernest Ballard (10994) being absent from roll call between 18 and 19 Jan 1915.
2/Lt.
Harmen
 
n/a
 
2/Lt Harmen joined 58 Bde during the reorganisation of 29 Nov 1916 when A/133 was split up and distributed across the various batteries of 58 Bde but was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column a few days later, on 2 Dec 1916.
Dvr.
Harris
Frederick Thomas
10607
B/58
Frederick Thomas Harris was born in 1885 in Tatworth, near Chard, Somerset. He worked as a labourer and married Elizabeth Knight in Chard on 11 Sep 1909; they had two children before war broke out.  Before the war he had served in the Somerset Militia but had bought himself out.  But after war was declared he enlisted in Taunton on 1 Sep 1914 into the RFA and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there to 185 Bty on 10 Sep 1914 which became B/58.  While training in Leeds he was absent from 12pm on 6 Jan until 7am on 7 Jan 1915, so was admonished by 2/Lt Borthwick.  He then suffered a “trivial” contusion and was admitted to the Military Hospital in Leeds on 20 Mar 1915.  On 27 or 20 Apr 1915 he was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column but was posted back to B/58 on 9 Jun 1915.  A few months late he left 58 Bde and was posted on 21 Nov 1915 to 146 Bde Ammunition Column, part of 28 Division, and served with them in Salonika.  He was appointed A/Bdr on 1 Apr 1916, reverting to gunner on 22 Jun 1917.  His wife heard that he was in Malta in early 1917.  He was posted to 116 Bde Ammunition Column on 12 Mar 1918.  He ended in 3/4 Reserve Bde and was granted a small pension due to 20% debility caused by malaria.  He was discharged from the Army on 31 Mar 1920.
Gnr.
Harris
R G
 
HQ
Gunner R G Harris was an orderly at 58 Bde HQ, who was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on 19 Jun 1918.
2/Lt.
Harris 
W H
n/a
C/58
2/Lt W H Harris had been serving in 5 Division Artillery when he joined the 11 Division Ammunition Column on 27 Apr 1918 and was posted to C/58 on 12 May 1918.  He went on 14 days’ leave on 11 Jun 1818.   A service was held on 4 Aug 1918 to commemorate the 5th year of the war and 2/Lt Harris was appointed the officer commanding men of the brigade who attended it.  After the Armistice, he had another period of leave to the UK between 1 and 18 Dec 1918.  He transferred to Bde HQ to act as Orderly Officer on 22 Dec 1918.  He took over the role of adjutant for the brigade on 14 Feb 1919 replacing 2/Lt Cox.    
Cpl.
Harrison
John
6773
 
John Harrison enlisted on 3 Sep 1914.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged on 28 Feb 1919 as being no longer fit for military service due to sickness.  
Dvr.
Hart
S
2261
 
Dvr S Hart is stated as having served in 58 Bde.
Gnr.
Hawes 
Reginald G
123188
B/58
Reginald G Hawes was serving in B/58 when he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on 17 Jun 1918.
A/Bdr.
Hawkes
Joseph John
22826
B/58?
Joseph John Hawkes was born in about 1879 in Wednesbury, near Walsall, Staffs.  He served in 3rd Bn Staffordshire Militia while working as a roller and then enlisted into the RFA in Walsall on 29 Sep 1897 and joined at Woolwich the following day.  He was allocated service number 22826 which stayed with him throughout his subsequent military career.  He was posted to 87 (Howitzer) Battery and served in the Second Boer War in South Africa between 27 Jan 1900 and 1 Oct 1902.  He married Elizabeth Martha Bumpey in Newcastle-upon-Tyne on 21 Nov 1903.  He was transferred to the Army Reserve on 14 Mar 1904 but re-engaged on 27 Sep 1909.  He was working as a horsekeeper in 1911 for the Territorial Association RFA and he re-engaged in Section D Army Reserve on 1 May 1915 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.  Immediately after war was declared he was mobilised at Hilsea on 5 Aug 1914 and posted to 6 Brigade Ammunition Column the next day.  He was promoted to Bdr on 20 Oct 1914.  He suffered problems with his right knee which hospitalised him for 100 days between 14 Dec 1917 and 23 Mar 1918, after which he was posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 2 Apr 1918 and then sent back to France on 9 Apr 1918.  He was posted to B/58 on 5 May 1918 and appointed A/Cpl on 28 Jun 1918, replacing L/9528 Johnson who had gone to hospital and being replaced as Bdr by Ernie Baron, reverting to Bdr on 6 Sep 1918 when Johnson returned from base.  He continued in the service from 27 Sep 1918 under the Military Service Act 1916 (session 2).   He made a claim for a bounty on 11 Oct 1918 under Army Order 209/16, which amounted to: for present issue £6.13.4 and for subsequent issue £3.6.8.  He was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Ripon on 9 Feb 1919 and was discharged on 10 Mar 1919 having served a total of 21 years 165 days in the Army, the Militia and the Reserve without ever being wounded except when he was kicked by a horse in 1898.  He died in Newcastle in 1940, aged 61. 
Dvr.
Hayes
James
139215
 
James Hayes was serving with 58 Bde when the absent voters list for Southwark was compiled in the autumn of 1918.  
Gnr.
Hayes
Ted
10672
58 Bde AC
Ted Hayes (who was registered as Teddy Hayes at birth) was born on 12 May 1895 in Walsall, Staffs.  Before the war he worked as an iron caster.  He enlisted in Birmingham on 1 Sep 1914.  He was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Sep 14 and transferred into D/58 on 21 Jan 1915.  While training at Milford Camp, he went absent without leave for 9 days between 4 and 13 May 1915 so Lt Col Drake awarded him 9 days’ field punishment No.1 and the forfeiture of 9 days’ pay.  One month later he overstayed leave by 3 days (12-15 Jun 15) so was fined 15 days’ pay by Lt Col Drake.  Along with the rest of D/58 he embarked at Devonport on 3 Jul 1915, but when he arrived in Alexandria on 18 Jul 1915 he was admitted to hospital with appendicitis.  He was transferred to Cyprus on 31 Jul 1915 and was discharged on 16 Aug 1915.  On 20 Aug 1915 he embarked in the “Handgreen” in Alexandria for overseas, embarking at Gallipoli on 8 Sep and disembarking at Alexandria on 23 Sep 1915.  He was admitted to 17 General Hospital with appendicitis (again) on 30 Jan 1916, to Red Cross Montazah on 21 Feb 1916 and then to the Convalescent Camp at Sidi Bishr on 18 Mar 1916.  He rejoined his unit at El Ferdan on 19 Mar 1916.  He was again admitted to hospital in about late May 1916 with scabies and was discharged to duty on 8 Jun 1916.  He left Alexandria on 28 Jun 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 7 Jul 1916.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 4 Dec 1916.  Admitted to 34 Field Ambulance on 1 Feb 1917 with an unknown fever, and then to 25 Hospital with scabies on 3 Feb 1917, rejoining from hospital on 12 Feb 1917.  He was posted back to D/58 on 25 Apr 17.  He was awarded 7 days’ Field Punishment No.2 for ill-treating a horse on 19 Apr 1917 by his battery commander, Maj Dane.  Shortly afterwards, he was granted leave to the UK between 16 and 26 May 1917.  After he returned, he was wounded in action on 2 Aug 1917, rejoining his unit on 17 Aug 1917.  He was granted a further 14 days leave to the UK via Boulogne between 4 and 18 Feb 18.  He was due back by 6.30am on 18th but didn’t return until 6.30am on 19th so was sentenced by Field General Court Martial to being absent without leave so was awarded 28 days’ Field Punishment No.1 which was subsequently confirmed by B.Gen Winter.   He again spent a few days in 34 Field Ambulance in May 1918 and again in March 1919, before going to the dispersal centre at Harrowby Camp, Grantham on 30 Apr 1919.   He married Mary Ann Richards in 1919.  He died on 18 Jan 1957 in Walsall.  
Capt.
Hayley   
William Burrell
n/a
OIC A/58
William Burrell Hayley was born on 17 Apr 1882.  He was commissioned into the Royal Artillery and was serving as a 2/Lt by 1902.  He was promoted to Captain on 21 Dec 1913 and was promoted to Major on 11 Sep 1915, which was subsequently antedated to 9 Sep 1915.  He arrived to take command of A/58 on 11 Oct 1915 while they were serving at Gallipoli but was described as Capt Hayley.   He left the brigade to join the Royal Horse Artillery, probably in July 1916 when they were on the Western Front.   On 2 Dec 1917 he was appointed a Brigade Major.  During the war he was Mentioned in Despatches and on 1 Jan 1918 he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.  After the war, he married Clare Marie Louise Fitzgerald-Murphy in 1920 in the Brompton Oratory, the wedding being reported in “The Times” of 18 Feb 1920; he was living in Lincoln House, Basil Street, London SW at the time.   In 1934, he was appointed Provost Marshal, Commander of the Corps of Military Police and the Officer in Charge of Records for Military Provost Staff Corps Headquarters at Ash Vale.  In about 1939 he was on the board of directors of Cambridge and Counties Crematorium Ltd.  He died on Sark in the Channel Islands on 21 Jan 1966.
Gnr.
Hemsley
Harry 
106593
 
Harry Hemsley enlisted on 14 Sep 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged on 5 Jun 1918 because he was no longer fit for military service due to wounds he had received. 
Lt.
Henderson
J
n/a
A/58
Lt J Henderson served in 11 Division Ammunition Column.  On 13 Sep 1917 he was posted to A/58, but shortly after he had to report sick on 30 Sep 1917.  He was struck off the strength of the brigade on 3 Oct 1917 because the Casualty Clearing Station reported that he had been gassed.  
Gnr.
Henderson
James D
125463
B/58
James D Henderson was serving with B/58 when the absent voters list for Dundee was compiled in the autumn of 1918.  His home address was 44 Magdalen Yard Rd, Dundee.
Sgt.
Henderson
Peter Gordon
23152
A/58
Peter Gordon Henderson was born in Edinburgh in about 1889.  He had spent 6 years serving in the Territorial Force’s 1st Lowland Bde RFA rising to the rank of Sgt before being discharged in May 1912.  He was working as a clerk in the Board of Trade when he wrote to No.6 Depot RFA shortly after the war broke out to ask to be allowed to enlist and was aware that if he enlisted he would immediately be promoted to Cpl.  He was instructed that if he wanted to enlist he should report to a recruiting office which he did in Kirkcaldy on 26 Sep 1914.  Having enlisted on 30 Sep 1914, he was posted first to No.6 Depot at Glasgow on 1 Oct 1914 and was duly promoted to Cpl the same day.  He was then posted to join 59 Bde Ammunition Column at Sheffield on 20 Oct 1914.  On 9 Dec 1914 he was reprimanded for irregular conduct while training at Sheffield, though only a month later was appointed A/Sgt on 11 Jan 1915.  He joined D/59 in January 1915 and sailed with his brigade from Devonport on 2 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 15 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  While serving there he was confirmed in the rank of Sgt on 28 Sep 1915.  As British forces withdrew, he embarked at Suvla Bay on 10 Dec 1915, arriving back in Alexandria on 22 Dec 1915.  In April 1916 he was posted, along with the rest of D/59, to form the B/133 Bde.  On 4 Dec 1916 he was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column and from there to B/58 on 6 Jan 1917.  At some point he was appointed A/BQMS in 58 Bde, a post he retained until he was admitted to No.4 Casualty Clearing Station with diarrhoea on 26 Apr 1917 and was not discharged back to duty until a month later on 25 May 1917.  On 12 Jun 1917 he was posted to A/58.  Several months later he was severely reprimanded by the OIC of A/58, Maj Skey, for having neglected his duty on 8 Nov 1917.  The following spring along with many others in the brigade, he was gassed on 8 Apr 1918 and was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance the same day.  He was then admitted to No.7 General Hospital at St Omer on 10 Apr 1918 and then transferred to No.3 Canadian Hospital, Le Tréport on 17 Apr 1918 and then to No.3 Convalescent Depot at Le Tréport on 27 May 1918, before reporting to the Base Depot at Le Havre on 2 Jul 1917.  From the Base Depot he was posted on 12 Jul 1918 to 6/40 Bde RFA and was promoted to BQMS on 2 Sep 1918 (his promotion subsequently being back-dated to take effect from 21 Aug 1918).  Later that month he was posted to 42 Bde RFA on 26 Sep 1918.  He was granted two weeks’ leave to the UK between 14 and 28 Oct 1918.  On 9 Nov 1918 the War Office wrote to ask if he would be willing to return to his civilian employment at his old civilian pay.  He appears to have accepted this because on 24 Dec 1918 at Le Havre he was ordered to return to the UK for demobilisation and to report to the Scottish Discharge Centre located at East London Street Schools, Edinburgh.  On 24 Jan 1919 he was demobilised. 
Lt.
Hepburn
 
n/a
D/58
Lt Hepburn was serving in 461 (Howitzer) Battery, also known as C/118 (Howitzer) Bde, when that battery transferred to become the new D/60 at Croiselle on 15 Jul 1916.  He was appointed to Acting Captain on 18 Apr 1917 and was posted to D/58.  
Gnr.
Hetherington
Percy
203742
B/58
Percy Hetherington was born in about 1889 in Blyth, Northumberland, the son of Robert and Mary Ann Hetherington.  He was working as a grocery warehouseman before the war and he enlisted in Blyth.  He was serving in B/58 when he was severely wounded, and he died of his wounds on 27 Oct 1917 in 7 General Hospital, France.
Dvr.
Hewitt    
William
75676
B/58
William Hewitt was born in Marston, near Northwich, Cheshire in about 1887.  Before he enlisted, he worked as a carter at the Goods Department, Glodwick Road Station, Oldham, Lancs, for the London and North Western Railway company.  He enlisted aged 27 in Oldham on 15 Jan 1915 and was posted initially to No.2 Depot at Preston and from there to 70 Bde RFA.  He went overseas with his unit on 7 Jul 1915, sailing from Southampton, arriving at Le Havre the next day.  After nearly a year overseas, he was granted leave to the UK in May 1916.  On 8 Jun 1916 his battery was renumbered as B/73.  On 19 Oct 1916, one of the horses he was tending, “No.59”, kicked him so he was admitted to a Casualty Clearing Station, and transferred to 8 General Hospital, Rouen, two days later, with a “contused back”, though the assessment at the time was that the injury would not, in the longer term, interfere with his duties as a soldier.  However, he had further back problems towards the end of that year and so was again hospitalised on 28 Dec 1916, from which he was posted to Base on 1 Jan 1917.   He was posted to B/58 on 11 Jan 1917.  He continued to have health issues: he was admitted to 108 Field Ambulance with tooth decay on 22 Jun 1917, rejoining his unit the following day; and was then admitted to 34 Field Ambulance with an unknown fever on 6 Dec 1917, rejoining B/58 two days later.  In between these, he was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 15 Aug 1917 and had another spell of 14 days’ leave to the UK from 12 Mar 1918.  Towards the end of the war he was awarded the Military Medal on 7 Dec 1918 (Authority XXII Corps, No. A4340/16) for bravery in the field, the citation reading “On night of Sep 26th 18 at Cambrai being the leading driver in the team, showing great skill and courage when under very heavy shell fire, and got through safely.”   He ended the war as Bdr and left France on 3 Apr 1919, arriving at No.1 Dispersal Unit, Heaton Park, Manchester the following day.  He returned to civilian life on 2 May 1919.  Later that year he was living back in Oldham when, on 23 Sep 1919, he wrote to ask for information about his Military Medal which had been gazetted on 22 July that year, and subsequently his former employer, LNER, asked if they could present him with his medal.
Capt.
Heywood
 
n/a
 
Capt Heywood was serving with 58 Bde when he left Gallipoli on 8 Oct 1915 heading for Mudros.
Gnr.
Hickinbottom
James
81219
A/58
James Hickinbottom, known as Jim, was born on 24 Apr 1894 in Tipton, Staffs, the son of Edward and Sarah Hickinbottom, and was a bottle blower by trade.  He enlisted on 25 May 1915 in Wolverhampton into the South Staffordshire Regt and was assigned service number 19124, joining at Lichfield on 1 Jun 1915 and becoming a private in that regiment.  Two days later he was sent to Sunderland for training but later that month he transferred to the RFA on 28 Jun 1915.  He was assigned a new service number 81219 and was appointed as a driver.  He was posted initially to No.1 depot at Newcastle-on-Tyne and while training there he overstayed leave from 6 pm on 5 Sep 1915 until 6.30 a.m. the following day so was awarded 5 days’ confinement to barracks.  He was posted to 4A Res Bde, Woolwich, and then on 15 Mar 1916 he went overseas, sailing from Devonport and disembarking in Alexandria on 27 Mar 1916.  The following month he was posted to 59 Bde Ammunition Column.  On 27 Jun 1916 he sailed from Alexandria to Marseilles, docking there on 4 Jul 1916.  On 20 Jul 1916 he was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column and he was granted leave to the UK from 14 to 24 Jul 1916.  He had a further 14 days’ leave to the UK, via Boulogne, in spring 1918.  He was attached to 1st Army School of Mortars between 7 and 21 Aug 1918.  He was posted to 58 Bde on 14 Dec 1918 and was granted leave to the UK via Calais between 22 Mar and 4 Apr 1919.  He left 58 Bde on 18 Jun 1919 when he was sent to go via Boulogne to the demobilisation centre at North Camp Ripon.  He was demobilised on about 20 Jun 1919 and returned to live in Tipton.  He was formally discharged from the Army on 31 Mar 1920.  He died in 1973 in Dudley.
Lt.
Hickman
 
n/a
A/58
Lt Hickman was serving with A/58 when he was wounded on 4 Oct 1917.  It was apparently a light wound because he stayed at duty without needing to be hospitalised.  On 18 Jan 1918 he went on 14 days’ leave to England, returning on 2 Feb 1918.  But on 8 Apr 1918 he and some of his men were caught in an intense enemy bombardment – estimated at about 15,000 shells.  These included some gas shells, of an unknown gas type, and he, along with 15 of his men were gassed.  He had to go to the Casualty Clearing Station, and he was struck off the strength of the brigade on 14 Apr 1918 due to his injuries. 
Sgt.
Hill
George
11012
A/58
George Hill was a printer who enlisted in Coventry on 1 Sep 1914, aged 24.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and then to 184 Bty on 2 Sep 1914 which subsequently became A/58. He obviously had a talent for leadership because he was promoted several times in quick succession: to Bdr on 14 Sep 1914, he was appointed Cpl on 17 Oct 1914 and promoted to the rank the same day and promoted Provisional Sgt on 2 Apr 1915.  He was transferred to D/58 on 6 May 1915.  Before leaving for Gallipoli he married Cecilia Sarah Jane Spreckley in the Registry Office at Hambledon, nr Guildford, Surrey on 4 Jul 1915.  The will he subsequently made out simply said “In the event of my death I give every thing I possess to my wife Cecilia Sarah Jane Hill”.  After service in Gallipoli, when he was in Egypt as member of D/58 he was transferred to A/133 when D/58 left the brigade to help form the new 133 Bde on 26 Apr 1916.  He went to France on 29 Jun 1916 with his new unit and was wounded on 7 Aug 1916 by “gunshot wound” to his left shoulder and fractured clavicle.  After spells in 6 Stationary Hospital, Frévent, and 1 General Hospital, Etretat, he was transferred back to the UK on 22 Aug 1916, where he remained for the rest of the war.   To Command Depot Ripon on 28 Apr 1918 and then posted to C Group Prisoner of War Reception Camp on 18 Nov 18.  To No.1 Dispersal Unit Chiseldon on 27 Jan 1919.  When he left active service on 26 Feb 1919, he was awarded a pension of 9 shillings 9d a week due to his injured shoulder.  He was formally demobbed on 31 Mar 1920.  He went to No.1 Dispersal Centre, Chiseldon for demobilisation 29 Jan 1919
Gnr.
Himsworth
Arthur Reginald
117053
D/58
Arthur Reginald Himsworth was born in Salford, Lancs, in 1893, the eldest of six children of Thomas and Elizabeth Henrietta Himsworth.  Like his father, he worked as a pawnbroker’s assistant before the war.  He enlisted in Salford and was serving in D/58 when he was killed in action on 3 Oct 1917.  He is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium.
Capt.
Hince
Charles William
n/a
OIC B/58
Born on 7 May 1878 in Church Stretton, Salop, the son of a corn merchant, Charles William Hince, was working as his father’s assistant in 1901.  He joined the Territorial Force and served in the Shropshire & Staffordshire Royal Garrison Artillery (Volunteers), and then transferred from them to the Shropshire Battery, Royal Horse Artillery on 1 Apr 1908.   He was serving as a Captain in the unit when he resigned his commission on 27 Sep 1911.  On 4 Sep 1914 he was recalled from the General Reserve of Officers to be a Captain in the Royal Artillery and he was posted on 9 Sep 1914 to join 185 Battery, 58 Bde as battery commander.  He must have left the brigade either at the end of 1914 or early in 1915.  He married Margaret Theresa O’Sullivan on 11 Jan 1915 in Hampstead, London, served overseas at some point that year and was promoted to Major on 15 Nov 1915.  After the war, he and his wife were living at 35 Greville Rd, Hampstead, in 1922.  He died on 28 Sep 1933 in London, aged 55.
Spr.
Hobbs
A
 
HQ
Sapper A Hobbs worked in the HQ of 58 Bde in Nov 1918, signing his name on the signals he received for the unit.
Gnr.
Hodgkinson
Leslie Grosvenor
20981
B/58
Leslie Grosvenor Hodgkinson was born on St Andrew’s Day, 1893, the son of Charles Grosvenor Hodgkinson and Mary A. Hodgkinson, of Billingborough, Lincs.  He was confirmed at All Saints, Raleigh Street, Nottingham, in 1912 and was a regular communicant.  He enlisted into the RFA in September 1914.  Some of his experiences are recounted in a couple of short articles published in the Grantham Journal in 1915 and 1917.  In the 1917 article it says that he had been “abroad for two years. After going through the Gallipoli campaign, he was sent to Egypt for six months, prior to being transferred to France, where he has been fighting since June 1916. His battery was engaged in all the big battles on the Somme and although he saw severe fighting at Arras, La Boisselle, Pozieres, Thiepval, Courcellette, Le Says, Bapaume and Bullecourt, his worst experiences were in the Ypres Sector.”  He had been promoted to Bdr by the summer of 1915 and to Cpl sometime thereafter, but when he was killed in action on 28 Jul 1917 he had reverted to Gunner.  He died aged 23 and although a cross was erected for him on the battlefield his remains were not found, so he is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.  His parents gave a stained glass window (a three-light window in the east side of the lady chapel, the centre light constituting the memorial) to St Andrew’s Church, Billingborough, Lincs.
Gnr.
Holden
John William
111693
B/58
John William Holden was born in Dunstable, Beds.  He enlisted in Walsall, Staffs, and was serving in B/58 when he died of wounds on 2 Oct 1918.  He is buried in Cagnicourt British Cemetery, France.
A/Bdr.
Holdsworth   
Walter
10601
B/58
Walter Holdsworth was born in about 1895 in Saltby, Birmingham, Warks, the eldest child of Walter and Eliza Holdsworth.  In 1911, aged 15, he was working as a machine tool maker, and when he enlisted in Rugby on 5 Sep 1914, aged 19, he described himself as an engineer.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 185 Bty 10 Sep 1914, which subsequently became B/58.  He was appointed A/Bdr 2 Apr 1915.  Along with his unit, he sailed from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He re-embarked at Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915 bound for Gallipoli.  On 10 Sep 1915 he was wounded in the left leg by a shell burst and was sent the same day to the Casualty Clearing Station by 2nd Welsh Field Ambulance.  He was transferred the same day to the Hospital Ship “Glenmart Castle” for evacuation to Egypt, where he was admitted to the Military Hospital Cairo on 16 Sep 1915.  He was transferred to the Base Depot Mustapha, Alexandria, on 1 Dec 1915 and posted from there to join A/57 on 22 Jan 1916.  While in Metras [modern-day El Metras], Alexandria, he was promoted to Bdr on 22 Jan 1916.  His battery was re-numbered to B/132 to help form the new 132 Bde RFA in Metras on 5 Mar 1916.  With 132 Bde he sailed from Alexandria on 9 Mar 1916, disembarking at Marseilles on 16 Mar 1916.  His battery was again re-numbered and became D/147 on 13 May 1916.  Later that year he was wounded for a second time: on 20 Oct 1916 he received “gunshot wounds” to his back and so was admitted to 18 General Hospital Camiers before being evacuated to England on 24 Oct 1916 where he stayed in the Military Hospital Lichfield for 6 days before being transferred for convalescence until 24 Nov 1916.  He went back overseas on 20 Mar 1917 and joined 49 Division Artillery, being posted to C battery of 245 (1st West Riding) Bde RFA.  He was confirmed in his rank of Sgt on 1 Nov 1917 and was awarded the Military Medal while serving in B/245 just before the cessation of hostilities, the award being gazetted on 17 Jun 1919.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK from 31 Dec 1918 to 14 Jan 1919, and soon after went to No.2 Dispersal Unit Chiseldon for demobilisation. 
Lt.
Hollick
Roland
n/a
 
Roland Hollick was born in 1885 in Stivichall, Coventry, the son of John and Kathleen Hollick.  In 1911, he was a solicitor living in Leamington Spa.  He appears to have enlisted in the ranks and joined the RHA with service number 126861 but was subsequently commissioned as 2/Lt in the Special Reserve of Officers on 11 May 1916 and went to France in Jul 1916.  He served in 11 Division Ammunition Column and then joined 58 Bde on 27 Oct 1916.  A week later he was granted 10 days’ leave to England on 4 Nov 1916, but a few weeks later he was struck off the strength of the brigade on 22 Dec 1916 on being evacuated to England.  His service after that is unclear: he finished the war as Lt and on 3 Jan 1919 relinquished his commission due to ill health.  He returned to his career in the law, practising again as a solicitor in Coventry by September 1919.  He died in 1966, aged 81.  
2/Lt.
Hope    
Hugh Lewis
n/a
D/58
Hugh Lewis Hope was born on 20 Jun 1897 in Folkestone, Kent, and baptised in Christ Church in that town on 27 Jul of that year.  His father was Col. Lewis Anstruther Hope CB who was ADC to King Edward VII and George V, his mother was Lucy Elizabeth Hope.  He went to Winchester College in September 1910 and during his time there he served in the Officers’ Training Corps, rising to the rank of corporal.  He was living at Gate Helmsley House, York, when he applied for a commission on 7 Oct 1914.  Since he was only 17, his father had to approve his application.  After training as a Gentleman Cadet at the Royal Military Academy, he was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 28 Jul 1915.  He went to France in late November 1915 and joined 118 (Howitzer) Bde RFA from Base on 30 Nov 1915 but was admitted to 7 General Hospital with rubella on 20 Feb 1916, being discharged on 1 Mar 1916.  Along with his battery he joined 58 Bde on 15 Jul 1916 to form the new D/58.  He was reported as doing “good work” on 14 Sep 1916.  On 2 Dec 1916 he was awarded the Military Cross for “daring FOO work at Wonder Work and making a valuable reconnaissance under heavy fire and carrying back a wounded man”.   He was on leave between 4 and 19 Jan 1917.  Shortly after returning, he went on a signalling course at 11 Division signalling school at Yvrench on 25 Jan 1917.  A month later he was wounded in the back on 26 Feb 1917 by a “gunshot wound” while acting as Forward Observation Officer following up the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line.  At the same time all three of the signallers with him were also wounded, two of them subsequently being captured while the third was found the next day.  Hugh Hope was patched up at 43 Field Ambulance and discharged the same day so remaining at duty.  He was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 22 Apr 1917, re-joining from sick leave on 5 May 1917.  A month later he was severely wounded in his right hand at the battery position by a shell on 18 Jun 1917 and was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance.  The injury led to him being evacuated to the UK on 21 Jun 1917 on HMHS “St. Patrick” from 14 General Hospital so was struck off the strength of the brigade on 29 Jun 1917.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917.  After recuperating, he arrived back in France at Le Havre on 22 Nov 1917 and was posted to Y Bty RHA on 26 Nov 1917.  He was attached to the Cavalry Corps Equitation School on 9 May 1918, re-joining his unit on 23 Jun 1918.  He was then posted to the Ammunition Column of 7 Bde RHA on 2 Jul 1918 but re-joined Y Bty RHA on 20 Jul 1918.  He was given 14 days’ leave to the UK from 19 Aug 1918.  On the day before the Armistice, he was wounded for a third time, receiving “gunshot wounds” to his right leg on 10 Nov 1918 and admitted to 1/3 West Lancashire Field Ambulance the following day, Armistice Day.  He was evacuated back to the UK from 20 General Hospital on 20 Nov 1918.  In 1920 he resigned his commission and applied to join the Reserve of Officers.  He reported for duty at No.4 Depot, Woolwich, on 9 Apr 1921, but 2 weeks later on 25 Apr 1921 was notified that his service was not required.  He married Ethel Lillian King on 9 Jun 1921 but died a few weeks later on 19 Oct 1921, possibly as a result of his wounds.  In Richard Blaker’s novel, “Medal Without Bar”, one of the central characters, Reynolds, is clearly based very heavily on Hugh Hope and Blaker portrays the Shakespeare-quoting Reynolds (Hope) with great warmth.
2/Lt.
Hothersall
William
n/a
D/58
William Hothersall was a Fitter Staff Sgt (service number 51561) in 105 Battery, 7 Division, and went with them to France in March 1915.  He was commissioned as 2/Lt in the Special Reserve of Officers from an Officers Cadet Unit on 17 Aug 1917.  He joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from the Base on 20 Oct 1917, but the next day he joined 58 Bde and was assigned to D/58.  He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 18 Jan 1918, returning on 3 Feb 1918.  On 26 Aug 1918, he formed part of a mobile battery during the “Hundred Days”.  He went to the UK for demobilisation on 25 Jan 1919 and while waiting for demobilisation was promoted to Lt on 17 Feb 1919.  
Dvr.
Hounsell
Sidney
11289
B/58
Sidney Hounsell was the son of Frederick William Hounsell and Eliza Hounsell (née Bishop).  He was born on 1 Aug 1894 in Litton Cheney, Dorset and was baptised on 2 Sep 1894.  In 1911 he was working as a wheelwright, aged 16, and two years later in 1913 he was working as an apprentice blacksmith.  He probably enlisted early in the war – possibly alongside another Litton Cheney man, Reginald Peach (11031).  After his military training he was posted to Egypt arriving there on about 19 Jul 1915.  He served in 11 (Northern) Division’s artillery and was recorded as serving in B/58 in October 1918 when the absent voters list for Dorset was compiled.  After the war he married Pearl Annie Hawkins on 31 Aug 1931 in Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset, and he, Pearl and their family were living at Dowerfield Dairy Farm, Long Bredy, Dorset in 1939.  They were still there when Sidney died suddenly after an intermittent illness on 16 Dec 1952, aged 58.  Members of the British Legion, of which Sidney had been a member, attended his funeral to pay their respects.
Sgt.
House   
Daniel J
41108
D/58
Daniel J House was from Wealdstone, Middx.  He was serving as a Sgt in D/58 in September 1918 when he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, the citation reading:   “On the night of 18/19 Sep 1918 he was in charge of five ammunition wagons and teams, when heavy shell fire was put down on the road, inflicting severe casualties on two teams.  He got his other three teams away, and stayed to assist the wounded drivers into dug-outs at the side of the road.  On 27 Sep he again displayed great gallantry while bringing his sub-section into action under heavy fire.”  His award was gazetted on 11 Mar 1920.  This was probably Daniel James House who was born on 6 Apr 1890, the son of William and Dorothea House.  In 1911 he was living in Wealdstone, Middx, with his parents and working as a carman.  He married Emily Mary Birch on 6 Jun 1914 in Paddington., London; they were living together in 356 Ladbroke Grove at the time.  In 1939 he was living in Harrow, Middx, working as a ganger – noted as a “heavy worker.  He died in 1947, aged 57.  
Gnr.
Houston
Andrew
 
D/58
Andrew Houston was the son of Alexander and Ann Houston (née McNaughton).  He was born in about 1882 and enlisted in Bridge of Weir, Renfrewshire, on 12 Sep 1914.  He appears to have joined 461 Bty and he went to France on 13 Jul 1915.  He had some leave at home in January 1916 before returning to his unit at Armentières.  He was posted to D/60 on 15 Jul 1916.  His section of 2 howitzers was posted to join D/58 on 29 Jan 1917.  He was severely wounded, dying of his wounds on 5 Jun 1918, aged 37.   He is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, France, and is commemorated on the Bridge of Weir Memorial.  Some sources give his service number as 22182, but there appears to have been a clerical error many years ago: that number belonged to a Gnr Alexander Houston from Paisley who was discharged from the Army in January 1915, but some of Andrew Houston’s details were inadvertently added to Alexander Houston’s records.
2/Lt.
Huckland?
 
n/a
D/58
A 2/Lt had been attached to D/58 but was posted on 27 Jan 1917 to a Trench Mortar unit. 
Cpl.
Hudson
F E
 
D/58
Cpl F E Hudson of D/58 was cited as a source by Lyn MacDonald in her book “Passchendaele”.
2/Lt.
Hughesdon
Arthur Hamilton
n/a
A/58
Arthur Hamilton Hughesdon was born in 1886 at 9 Connaught Road, Stroud Green, Hornsey.  He was granted the Freedom of the City of London on 3 Nov 1908 because his father, Arthur James Hughesdon, was a member of the Company of Haberdashers, He was initiated into the Freemasons’ United Strength Lodge on 8 Nov 1910.  He married Olive Fenton Ward on 11 Mar 1911.   Later that year, he was working as a ship broker and living at “Ottawa”, Westbury Road, North Finchley, London, with his new wife.   He enlisted as a Private in the 28th London Regt – the Artist’s Rifles – with service number 3184.  He was commissioned into the Special Reserve of Officers as a 2/Lt on probation in the RFA from an Officers Cadet Unit on 2 Dec 1916.  He arrived in France on 30 Jan 1917.  He served in 11 Division Ammunition Column and was posted to A/58 on 22 Apr 1917.  A few weeks later, he was posted to 59 Bde on 25 Jun 1917.   He was promoted to Lt on 2 Jun 1918 but was killed in action on 27 Sep 1918, aged 32.  He is buried in Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, France. 
2/Lt.
Humphris
John Henry
n/a
B/58
John Henry Humphris was from East Ham, London.  He served as an NCO in the RFA in the early years of the war, first going overseas to France on 28 Nov 1915 as a Cpl with service number L/28636.  He was subsequently promoted to Sgt, and then was commissioned on 20 Jan 1918.  He served in 11 Division Ammunition Column until 30 Mar 1918 when he was attached to B/58.  Just 10 days later on 9 Apr 1918 he was gassed along with many others and retired to the wagon lines.  He was posted from B/58 to A/58 on 5 May 1918 and was one of several of the brigade’s officers who were noted as being sick as of 12 May 1918.  He returned briefly to B/58 on 20 May 1918 but was back in A/58 when he went on a signalling course on 21 Aug 1918.  During the 100 days he formed part of mobile a battery on 26 Aug 18, and after a short period of leave, returned to his unit on 6 Nov 1918.  After the Armistice he was sent on a gas course on 16 Nov 1918 and went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 20 Mar 1919, returning on 6 Apr 1919.  He went to Bessemer Dump on 19 Apr 1919.  
Gnr.
Hunt
Arthur
10554
A/58
Arthur Hunt was born in Yeovil, Somerset.  He enlisted in Yeovil and after travelling in July 1915 with his unit, A/58, from the UK to Alexandria, died there on 8 Aug 1915.   He is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery. 
2/Lt.
Hunt
Norman
n/a
D/58
2/Lt Norman Hunt and his soldier servant embarked on the “Empress Britain” at Liverpool on 1 Jul 1915 along with 7 other officers of 58 Bde and their soldier servants.  They sailed for Alexandria, Egypt, arriving about two weeks later.   On 2 Oct 1915 he was “OC Details” and awarded Dvr Frank Nichol (10675) of C/58 seven days’ confinement to camp for “irregularity on parade”.  Four days later he was at Mudros on 6 Oct 1915 with 82 men and was in charge of horses & transport for both 58 & 59 Bdes.  
Spr.
Hunter 
   
HQ
Sapper Hunter was wounded on 7 Jun 1917 while working for the HQ of 58 Bde.  
2/Lt.
Hunter    
Norman Thomas Crichton
n/a
C/58
Norman Thomas Crichton Hunter was born in 1897 in Perth, Perthshire, to Robert and Mary Hunter.  He enlisted into the artillery and served briefly as a gunner with service number 130264 but applied for a commission and after training in an Officer Cadet Unit was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt on 27 Jul 1916.  He was posted to France, arriving on about 5 Aug 1916.  He must have joined C/58 very soon after arriving because on 26 Sep 1916 he was slightly wounded, while serving as a Forward Observation Officer for the battery.  On 16 Dec 1917 he was a candidate for the division’s Commander Royal Artillery’s “examination of 2/Lts for promotion (1st sitting)”.  He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 6 Jan 1918 and was placed in charge of 11 Division’s leave party for the journey, returning to his battery on 22 Jan 1918, and was promoted to Lt a few days later on 28 Jan 1918.  He was sent to 1 Corps Officers’ Rest Station on 3 May 1918 and was included in a list of several of the brigade’s officers who were sick as of 12 May 1918, Norman Hunter being at the Casualty Clearing Station at the time.  He returned to duty from hospital on 29 May 1918.  He went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 20 Sep 1918, returning to his unit on 6 Oct 1918 and was awarded the Military Cross the same day.  His medal was awarded for an act of bravery near Boiry Notre Dame the citation saying that it was “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While the enemy were shelling the battery position, a camouflage net covering a dump of ammunition caught fire. This officer rushed to the spot and threw earth over the fire at great personal risk. It was due to his courage and initiative that the whole of the ammunition and a quantity of equipment were saved. Having extinguished the fire, he moved two gunners who were badly wounded to a place of safety.”  The brigade had been near Boiry Notre Dame in mid-September of that year so the action may have taken place shortly before he went on leave.  As the Germans continued to retreat, he went out on mounted patrol at 7am on 6 Nov 1918 to ascertain and report what was going on and returned with “most valuable and accurate information” obtained “under great difficulty”.  He formed a brigade cavalry party comprising himself and 30 other ranks to act independently the day before the Armistice, 10 Nov 1918.  They located the enemy at 8.30am that day and withdrew under machine gun fire.  He passed the location of the machine gun to the brigade who silenced them by shell fire.  After the war was over, he went to the UK for demobilisation on 14 Feb 1919 and formally relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920.  After the war he worked as a solicitor in Perth and died in 1973.  
Maj.
Hutchinson  
Edward Maitland
n/a
OIC B/58
Born on 21 Nov 1884 in Bedford, Edward Maitland Hutchinson was commissioned as a 2/Lt into the RFA following training at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, on 23 Dec 1903.  In 1911 he was a Lt and was staying in the Officers Mess, Hilsea.  Once war was declared, Lt E M Hutchinson was promoted to Captain on 30 Oct 1914 “and remain seconded”: he was attached to the Bikaner Camel Corps of the Indian Expeditionary Force at the time.  Maj E M Hutchinson was restored to the establishment on 1 Apr 1917.  Later that year he had joined 58 Bde and was commanding C/58, but after the previous CO, Maj Baines, returned on 5 Oct 1917, he moved to take command of B/58.  He acted as the brigade commander probably for a few days later that year but was replaced in that role on 7 Dec 1917 when Maj Dane returned.  He went on the 5th Senior Officers’ Course at Shoeburyness, on 4 Jan 1918, returning to the brigade after the course and some leave on 5 Feb 1918.  He was due to go on a 6-week long learner’s Staff course in April 1918, but before he could do so he was wounded by gas and so was temporarily struck off the strength of the brigade on 14 Apr 1918.  He was soon back with B/58 and was both Mentioned in Dispatches on 24 May 1918 and awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the King’s Birthday Honours of 4 Jun 1918.  He returned from Royal Artillery HQ on 16 Dec 1918 and assumed command of the brigade since the OIC, Lt Col Bedwell, had gone to take command of 11 Division Artillery.  He was posted to command C/58 on 1 Jan 1919, though soon after went on leave, returning on 17 Jan 1919 when he also assumed command of the brigade again and was made a temporary Lt Col for being in command of a brigade on 22 Jan 1919.  He went to the Division’s Artillery HQ on 27 Feb 19 and was then posted to command A/58 on 15 Mar 1919.  He then went on leave again to the UK on 26 Apr 1919, returning on 13 May 1919.  After 58 Bde was disbanded he at some point he joined 1st South Midland Bde RFA as a supernumerary Major and acted as their adjutant but was “restored to the establishment” on 1 May 1920 when he was replaced as adjutant.  In 1939, he and his wife Phyllis and their children John and Diana were living in Amersham, Bucks, and he was working as a District Manager for Cannon Brewery Co Ltd, of London.  He died on 4 Apr 1957 and is buried in Bowstridge Lane Cemetery, Chalfont St Giles, Bucks.  
Capt.
Hutton    
Thomas Jacomb 
n/a
OIC A/58
Thomas Jacomb Hutton was born on 27 Mar 1890 in Nottingham and educated at Rossall School.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 23 Dec 1909 after having attended the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich.  In Apr 1911 he was a 2/Lt in 134 Battery, stationed in Louisburg Barracks, Bordon, Hants.  His battery was part of 32 Bde RFA, 4 Division.  He was promoted to Lt the following year and after war was declared he went to France as part of the BEF with his battery.  He was still serving in 32 Bde RFA when he was first Mentioned in Dispatches on 22 Jun 1915, having been awarded the Military Cross shortly beforehand (gazetted on 3 Jun 1915).  He was Mentioned in Dispatches a further three times, which appeared in the London Gazette on 4 Jan 1917, 18 May 1917 and 11 Dec 17.  He joined 58 Bde on about 27 Jul 1916 and received a “very warm welcome” from Lt Col Winter and was appointed the commanding officer of A/58.   He was bruised in the stomach on 23 Oct 1916 at Courcelette by a large shell fragment, but fortunately it did no worse damage than making him very sore.  Along with Maj Piper of B/58, he went to dinner with the CRA on 30 Oct 1916 and had a night’s rest.  He was again hit, but seemingly not injured, by a bit of shell on 8 Nov 1916 and then on 16 Nov 1916 he went sick suffering from shell-shock.  His own diary simply records: “I was sent down to the clearing station at Gomiecourt”.   He was away for 6 weeks, returning just after Christmas, and was promoted to A/Major since he was now in command of a 6-gun battery – his promotion being back dated to 27 Nov 1916.  He assumed temporary command of the brigade on 1 Jan 1917, returning to command A/58 when Maj Griffin returned from leave, ten days later.  On 4 May 1917 he returned from some sick leave and then had some normal leave, returning on 22 Jun 1917.  He was wounded by a shell in the leg, chest and arm on 21 Aug 1917 and evacuated, so reverted to the rank of Captain on 21 Aug 1917 on ceasing to command a battery.  He returned to 11 Division on 25 Sep 1917 and was appointed the artillery’s Brigade Major.  He was attached to 32 Inf Bde between 5 and 10 Oct 1917 during their failed attack.   He was appointed a Brevet Major on 2 Jan 1918 and moved to B/58, and was commanding that battery on 9 Apr 1918 when he was gassed along with many others and retired to the wagon lines.  He was temporarily struck off the strength of the brigade on 14 Apr 1918 after having been “wounded gas” but returned a fortnight later on 28 Apr 1918.  On 11 Jun 1918 he was posted to act as temporary Brigade Major (BM) to 34 Infantry Bde when their BM went on leave, and he was struck off the strength of 58 Bde on 4 Jul 1918 when he again stood in for the 34 Inf Bde BM who went off on a staff course.  In due course he too became staff qualified and acted as GSO3 to 51 Division from 4 Sep 1918.  He then served as BM to 34 and 185 Inf Bdes.   After the war he served as Assistant Military Secretary, Constantinople, 1919 – 1920, which is where he met his future wife, the Scottish psychiatrist, Dr Isabel Galloway Emslie, who he married in 1921.  He had a long and distinguished career in the Army, ending up as a Lt Gen and being awarded a KCB and KCIE, before retiring in 1944.  He retained the honorary role of Colonel Commandant of the Royal Artillery until 1952.  His wife passed away in 1960 and he died on 17 Jan 1981 and is buried in St Andrews churchyard, Clevedon, North Somerset.  Both Wikipedia and King’s College London have articles on him.  
Gnr.
Hyde
Thomas
10933
B/58
Thomas Hyde was born in Uploders, near Bridport, Dorset, in January 1890 to parents William John Gundry Hyde and Emily Gill Hyde.  He was baptised on 9 Feb 1890. He worked as a baker and was living in Piddletrenthide, Dorset when he enlisted in Bridport on 2 Sep 1914, aged 24. He was initially posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and then on 10 Sep 1914 to 185 Bty as a gunner, which became B/58.  He was hospitalised in the Military Hospital Leeds with cowpox between 14 and 21 Oct 1914.  He sailed from Devonport with 58 Bde on 1 Jul 1915, arriving on 14 Jul 1915 in Alexandria, then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  A few weeks later he was admitted to hospital with dysentery and then evacuated to Malta on HMHS “Assaye” where he was admitted to hospital on 26 Sep 1915.  From Malta, he sailed on 31 Oct 1915 on HMHS “Panama”, arriving back in the UK on 8 Nov 1915 and was admitted the next day to Clearing Hospital Eastleigh.  After his recuperation, he was posted to France on 6 Jan 1916 and joined 19 Division Ammunition Column (DAC), but 3 months later was ill again and was admitted to 32 Casualty Clearing Station on 19 Apr 1916 with jaundice.  He was transferred back to the UK on HS “Delta” on 23 Apr 1916 and was admitted to 4th General Hospital London the following day.  He was discharged on 5 May 1916 and after recovering from that, he went back to France on 27 Aug 1916 and was posted to 25 DAC on 5 Sep 1916 and then to A/112 Bde RFA on 14 Sep 1916.  He was briefly appointed A/Bdr while in 112 Bde on 9 Mar 1917.  He was wounded with a “gunshot wound” to his right forearm and was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance on 18 Jun 1917.  He was evacuated to the UK on HS “St David” from Boulogne on 23 Jun 1917 and stayed in 3rd Western General Hospital, Cardiff, between 23 Jun and 28 Aug 1917.   He married Grace Ann Marsh Barter on 5 Jan 1918 in Netherbury, Dorset, and they settled in Beaminster, Dorset.  Grace received a separation allowance.  Thomas returned to France on 18 Feb 1918 where he joined B/242 (Army) Bde RFA.  After the Armistice, he returned to the UK on 25 Jan 1919 and went to the Dispersal Centre Fovant for demobilisation.
Cpl.
Inch
Ernest
21122
C/58
Ernest Inch was the son of John Henry and Emily Inch.  He was born in Ashgate, Derbyshire, in 1894, and worked as a tram conductor for the Chesterfield Corporation before the war where it was said that he won the regard of his passengers “by his courtesy and kindly consideration”.  He enlisted in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, on 3 Sep 1914 aged 20, and was posted probably to D/60 and was trained in Norwich.  After serving with his battery at Suvla Bay, he probably transferred to 133 Bde along with all his battery in April 1916 and after serving in France was transferred to C/58 probably at the end of 1916.  He had leave to the UK in August 1917 and returned to his battery on 30 Aug 1917.  On the morning of 29 Sep 1917, he was asleep in his dug out with some of his comrades when a shell struck, killing him as well as Gnr John Crockford and Bdr Harold Wragg.  They were buried the next day by the Chaplain, Rev Cecil G Ruck, and all are believed to be buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium.  After his death, his fiancée Miss R Colliss received letters from a friend of Ernest’s who had served throughout the war with him, George Aindow, who mourned his “splendid comrade” Ernie, and from one of his officers, Captain T C Foster, who regretted the death of “a very good and energetic NCO” who, just before he died, he had recommended for promotion to sergeant.  
Gnr.
Inman
Thomas
233480
B/58
Thomas Inman lived in Croydon before he enlisted in Woolwich.  He was serving with B/58 when he was killed in action on 2 Oct 1918.  He was initially buried just outside the village of Fontaine-les-Croisilles, but he was subsequently re-buried in Quéant Road Cemetery, Buissy.
Sgt.
Isaac
William
67750
D/58
William Isaac was a shoemaker and was born in Islington, Middx.  He joined the pre-war regular Army when he enlisted, aged 18, on 17 Nov 1911 for a period of 3 years active service followed by 9 years in the reserve.  He had 5 days in hospital at the Curragh between 14 and 18 Jun 1913 with scabies.  He served in 15 Bde and after war was declared went to France on 19 Aug 1914.  Two months later he was wounded on 20 Oct 1914 by a “gunshot wound” to his abdomen.  He was admitted to 15 Field Ambulance at Béthune and then after being evacuated to the UK was admitted to 3rd Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, on 23 Oct 1915.  His next of kin was said to be his unnamed wife at 90 Murray St, New North Road, London N1.  He joined 118 Bde RFA and returned to France with them, landing at Le Havre on 11 Mar 1915.  He was granted leave between 11 and 19 Dec 1915 and was appointed A/Bdr on 24 Feb 1916.  He was briefly hospitalised between 24 and 30 May 1916, and then along with the rest of his battery he was transferred to 58 Bde on 18 Jul 1916 to form the new D/58.  On 29 Oct 1916, he was admitted to 19 Divisional Rest Station with nasal polyps, had a minor operation to remove them and so was discharged to duty two days later.   He was promoted to Bdr in early 1917 to replace Bdr Herbert Browne (39280) who had been wounded and evacuated to the UK.  On 9 Apr 1917 he was again promoted to replace a casualty – he became a Cpl to replace Cpl Frank Craig (7252) who had been killed by a premature – and the following month was promoted a third time to become a Sgt on 24 May 1917.  He was then granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 3 Jun 1917, but the following month was wounded in action on 27 Jul 1917 with a “gunshot wound” to his right shoulder.  He was admitted to 138 Field Ambulance and after a period of recuperation joined the Base depot on 12 Aug 1917 and was posted back to D/58 on 22 Aug 1917.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK via Boulogne on 14 Mar 1918 and the following month married Léopoldine Lobel Isaac of 22 rue de l’Alma, Noeux les Mines, Pas de Calais, France.  On 13 Aug 1918 he left 58 Bde to return to the UK for a 6 moth tour of duty under the terms of WO letter 114/Gen/No/5812(AGI) dated 12 Jan 1918.  He sailed from Le Havre on 29 Aug 1918 and was posted to 415 Battery on 25 Sep 1918.  He was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Crystal Palace in February 1919 ready for demobilisation and was discharged on 5 Mar 1919 as being no longer physically fit for war service.  After being discharged, he sought a pension due to deafness, which he said dated from March 1917.  He had not reported to hospital at any point due to it and was assessed as having less than 20% debility in Dec 1919.  However, after an appeal, he was examined by a specialist on 19 May 1920 who diagnosed “labyrinthine deafness of both ears and chronic non-suppurative inflammation of both middle ears” though the subsequent Medical Appeal Board found he still had less than 20% debility from this.  He was therefore awarded a gratuity of £71 5s though deductions were to be made from this of any pay he had received during the period covered by the award.
Gnr.
Jackson
Richard
97385
B/58
Richard Jackson was born in Hounslow, Middx.  He was living in Acton Green, London, when he enlisted.  He was serving in B/58 when he died of wounds on 23 Sep 1917 while serving in the Ypres salient.  He is buried in Duhallow Advanced Dressing Station Cemetery, Belgium, and his war gratuity was paid to his widow, Jane.
Sgt.
Jarvis    
Ernest E 
52612
A/58
Sgt Ernest E Jarvis was serving in A/58 when he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 24 Jun 1917.  The citation for his award stated that it was given “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  Whilst under heavy gas shell fire in his gun-pit, the roof was pierced, and he and two other inmates were gassed and wounded.  In spite of his own suffering, he carried the wounded man to the dressing station.  He has on previous occasions been recommended for displaying the utmost courage and coolness under fire.”  Due to the wounds he sustained in this action, he did not return to A/58.  
BQMS
Jefferson
   
C/58
BQMS Jefferson was serving as the battery quartermaster sergeant of C/58 in Egypt when he was posted away from the brigade on 9 Feb 1916 and so was replaced by Herbert Prestidge (10598).  BQMS Jefferson is very likely to have been BQMS William Jefferson (62488) who was a pre-war soldier and who was serving as a Cpl in 2 Bde RFA when he went to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force on 11 Sep 1914.
Gnr.
Jinks
William
99569
B/58
William Jinks was born in North Ormesby, Yorkshire on 30 Jan 1896.  He was the son of Stephen and Hannah Jinks, and they had him baptised on 20 Feb 1896 in Middlesbrough Circuit Primitive Methodist Church, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire.  Before the war he worked as a labourer in an iron foundry and was probably one of the original men who joined 58 Bde when it was formed.  He was serving in B/58 in the Ypres salient when he was wounded.  He was evacuated to 53 General Hospital, Boulogne, but died of his wounds there aged 21.  He is buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery, France.
BSM
Johns
   
D/58?
BSM Johns was probably serving in D/58 when he witnessed Dvr William Robinson (10712) being late for the 1130 parade at Leeds on 30 Jan 1915
Gnr.
Johnson
Albert Edward  
10701
C/58
Albert Edward Johnson was born in 1896 in Chilvers Coton, near Nuneaton, Warks.  In 1911 he was living with his widowed grandmother, Mary Elson, and his father, Harry Johnson, and Albert as working as a general labourer in a stone quarry at the time.  On 4 Sep 14, he enlisted in Nuneaton, aged 19, and was now working as a miner. He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and then on 10 Sep 1914 to C/58.  After training, he sailed from Devonport with his battery on 1 Jul 1915, Arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking on Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  A week before his battery was evacuated from Gallipoli, Albert was awarded 28 days’ Field Punishment No.2 on 11 Dec 1915 for “While on active service neglect of duty as telephonist”.  After the evacuation, he arrived back in Alexandria on 1 Jan 1916.  Along with his battery, he sailed from Alexandria on 26 Jun 1916, arriving at Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.   In France, he was reported for neglect of duty on 21 Oct 1916 and so was awarded 5 days’ Field Punishment No.2 a week later on 28 Oct 1916.  He was granted leave to the UK between 12 and 31 Jan 1917.  In September 1917, he started to receive a number of promotions: on 29th he was promoted to Bdr, then on 22 Jan 1918 he was appointed A/Cpl, and then on 25 Apr 1918 was appointed paid A/Sgt.  He was granted extra pay of 2d per day throughout July and August 1918 for being an assistant Instructor in signalling.  He was re-designated as a Signaller Sgt on 12 Oct 1918 and was posted back to the UK earlier than most on 30 Dec 1918 so that he could be released and return to his work as a miner.  He therefore reported to No.2 Dispersal Unit, Chiseldon, on 1 Jan 1918 and was formally demobbed on 31 Mar 1920.  In 1920 he was living in George St, Attleborough, Nuneaton.
Cpl.
Johnson
John Thomas
L/9528
B/58
John Thomas Johnson was born in Runcorn, Cheshire, in about 1896.  He moved to Manchester, where he worked as a carter and he married Mary Alice Whyatt on 8 Aug 1914 in St Matthew’s Church, Manchester, and their son, George Thomas Johnson, was born on 21 Nov 1914.  He enlisted in Lytham St Annes on 22 Feb 1915, aged 19.  He was posted first to 149 Bde and then on 13 May 1915 to 169 Bde.  He was appointed an acting full Bdr on 24 Oct 1915 and promoted to A/Cpl on 13 Nov 1915, being confirmed in that rank on 18 Jun 1916.  He sailed with his battery in January 1916 for Egypt, but a few weeks later they re-embarked at Alexandria on 29 Feb 1916 and arrived in Marseilles on 9 Mar 1916.  He was admitted to 93 Field Ambulance with an ulcerated leg on 30 Jun 1916, being discharged to duty at Base Details Etaples from 20 General Hospital on 7 Aug 1916.  On 30 Aug 1916 he was posted to C/169 which became A/169 the same day, but the following month he was re-admitted to hospital in 137 Field Ambulance with rheumatic fever on 18 Sep 1916, and then sent three days later to 1 Convalescent Depot.   He was posted to 157 Bde in December 1916.  He was granted leave between 5 and 12 Feb 1917 and was admitted to 2/2 South Midland Field Ambulance with an unknown fever (pyrexia of unknown origin) on 2 Apr 1917 but was returned to duty from 107 Field Ambulance four days later.  He was admitted to 102 Field Ambulance with a sprained – possibly fractured – right ankle on 16 Sep 1917 which he sustained while in action when serving in C/157.  He was evacuated to the UK on 26 Sep 1917 and was admitted to St George’s Hospital at Hyde Park Corner in London the same day, staying there until 23 Oct 1917.  An x-ray showed that he had not fractured the ankle.  He went to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon on 2 Nov 1917 and had a denture re-made on 4 Jan 1918 before returning to France on 18 Feb 1918.  He was then posted to B/58 on 16 Apr 1918.  His run of ill-health continued: on 28 Jun 1918 he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance suffering from boils, so his place as A/Cpl was taken by Bdr Hawkes (22826).  When John Johnson returned to the unit from the Base Depot on 6 Sep 1918, Hawkes reverted to Bdr.   After the Armistice, he went to No.1 Dispersal Unit at Heaton Park on 4 Apr 1919 for demobilisation.  
2/Lt.
Johnson
Richard McMaster
n/a
B/58
Richard McMaster Johnson was born on 2 Jan 1887 in Kensington, London, the son of John W Johnson, a clerk, and Ethel P Johnson, a journalist and author.   He was living in Stafford when he enlisted into the RFA on 13 Nov 1914 and was posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea barracks.  He was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt into the RFA on 11 Dec 1914 and assigned to 58 Bde, serving initially in B/58 and later in 58 Bde’s Ammunition Column.  While in training at Leeds he had epileptic fits, so a Medical Board was held which found him fit.  However, his commanding officer, Lt Col Kuper objected to taking him abroad and after he had more fits, a second Medical Board was held for him at Witley Camp on 17 May 1915.  A certificate was provided by a military doctor stating that he had seen Johnson during a fit and in his opinion Johnson had “True Epilepsy (Grand Mal)”.   The board therefore determined that since he suffered from epilepsy he could not be employed in the Armed Services even on light duties so was gazetted out due to ill health.  In 1916, Johnson worked temporarily as an interpreter at a Prisoner of War Camp, but sadly had another fit.  He therefore had to write to the War Office requesting another medical board to determine his fitness for working for the Director of Prisoners of War, claiming to be “in very good health” and “quite fit for this work”.   However, the War Office said that due to the findings of the Witley Medical Board he could not “be considered for any military employment as a commissioned officer”.
Gnr.
Johnson
Sidney
176572
 
Sidney Johnson (sometimes spelled Sydney Johnson) enlisted on 12 Feb 1916.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army due to his wounds on 22 Nov 1918.  
Ftr S/Sgt.
Johnson    
Henry Ernest
52136
A/58
Henry Ernest Johnson was born in about 1892.  He was the son of Harry and Mary Louisa Johnson of 25, Pendine Road, Whitchurch, Glam.   During a very heavy barrage on 21 Aug 1917, he was serving with A/58 when he was singled out for praise by his battery commander for putting out dumps and providing aid to the wounded of the battery and other batteries.  Sadly, he was killed in action a few weeks later, on 12 Sep 1917 and is buried in Gwalia Cemetery, Belgium.  He was awarded the Military Medal, though this was not gazetted until 19 Nov 1917, two months after his death.  
Dvr.
Jones
Francis John
11161
B/58
Francis John Jones was born in Bristol in about 1895, the son of Daniel and Evelina Jones.  He was working as a fitter while living at Folly Lane, St Phillips, Bristol, when he enlisted in Bristol on 4 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and then on 10 Sep 1914 to 185 Bty (later B/58).  While training in Leeds, he was punished for “neglecting to obey an order” on 20 Mar 1915, and so was given 5 days’ confinement to barracks by Maj Meyricke.  While training at Milford Camp he slightly overstayed his leave – by just 2 hours and 45 minutes – on 26 May 15, for which he was given 7 days’ confinement to barracks again by Maj Meyricke.  He appears to have served with the unit in Egypt and possibly Gallipoli but, probably after being evacuated sick or wounded, he was posted to A/130 on 28 Nov 1915, which became D/31 25 Jul 16, and so served at Salonika for the remainder of the war.  He was posted to base on 6 Jun 1918 and then to 101 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Jun 1918, before returning to D/31 on 19 Jul 1918.  Soon after, he was insolent to an NCO, A/Bdr White, and given 28 days’ Field Punishment No.1 on 27 Aug 18 by the commander of 31 Bde RFA.  After the Armistice, he left the Mediterranean Theatre on 16 Dec 1918 and went to “Russia” (probably Batoum – modern day Batoumi in Georgia) as part of the Allied Intervention forces but left there on 18 Jan 1919 and was sent to No.1 Dispersal Unit Fovant in April 1919.  
2/Lt.
Jones
R A
n/a
 
2/Lt R A Jones sailed on the “Empress Britain” from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915 as an officer in 58th Bde.  He would have arrived in Alexandria on 14 July and sailed for Gallipoli about 2 weeks later.  He landed at B Beach just south of Suvla Bay from HMT “Suevic” on 9 Aug 1915 and accompanied the brigade commander, Lt Col Drake, to look for the brigade’s guns which had been landed further south along the bay.  This was probably Robert Avery Jones who had been commissioned into the RFA on 21 Jan 1915 and who ended the war as a Major, before emigrating to the USA and settling in Springfield, NJ.
Gnr.
Jones
   
B/58
After attending a course at XIII Corps school, Gnr Jones was passed as a 1st class signaller on 22 Mar 1917.
Lt.
Jones
 
n/a
A/58
A Lt Jones was posted to join A/58 on 16 Oct 1916.  
Cpl.
Jones   
   
HQ
A Bdr Jones of HQ 58 Bde witnessed an offence by Dvr W Birch (11284) on 18 Jun 1915 while they were training at Milford Camp. Probably the same Bdr Jones of HQ 58 Bde was replaced as Bdr – potentially because he had been promoted to Cpl – by Joseph Lynch (104930) on 13 Aug 1916.  And again, probably the same man in HQ 58 Bde was a Cpl when on 22 Dec 1916 he was awarded the Military Medal.  
Gnr.
Joynson
William
75917
C/58
William Joynson was born in about 1896, the son of William and Annie Joynson.  Before the war he worked as a warehouse lad in a pottery, while living at 10 Hazelhurst Street, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent.  On 5 Oct 1917, he and Bdr Davidson were killed in action in the Ypres salient from a direct hit on their gun pit.  He is buried alongside Davidson in New Irish Farm Cemetery, St Jean-les-Ypres, Belgium. 
Gnr.
Keep
Albert Victor
10660
A/58
Albert Victor Keep was born in Bristol on 25 Oct 1888, the son of John and Elizabeth Keep, and was baptised in St Philip and St Jacob Church, Bristol, on 18 Nov 1888.  Before the war, he worked as a drayman for a brewery and lived with his widowed mother in Commercial Road, Bristol.  On 31 Aug 1914, he enlisted in Bristol Recruiting Office No.2 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  He was posted to 184 Bty on 10 Sep 1914, which became A/58.  He went overseas with 58 Bde on 1 Jul 1915 and probably served at Gallipoli before leaving his unit and the area on 1 Nov 1915 to return to the UK, probably due to either sickness or injury.  Injury seems the most likely, because he remained in the UK for the next 18 months, being assigned to 5C Reserve Bde, then posted to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon on 25 Aug 1916 and 2A Reserve Bde on 13 Oct 1916, before being posted to a Howitzer Bde on 23 Nov 1916.  He then went to France on 2 May 1917 with his new brigade and was appointed A/Bdr on 23 Jul 1917.   He returned to the UK, again probably due to illness or injury, on 14 Jan 1918, before returning to France in mid-May 1918, and then returning again to the UK a month before the Armistice on 11 Oct 1918.  He was sent to a dispersal centre ready for demobilisation in February 1919.  Albert Keep died in Bristol in 1947, aged 59.  
Gnr.
Kellaway
William Edwin
135439
D/58
William Edwin Kellaway was born in Portsmouth in 1891, the son of Charles and Alice Kellaway.  In 1911 he was an unemployed dock worker in Portsmouth, and the following year he married Matilda Norton.  They had two children.  He enlisted in Ryde, Isle of Wight, and was serving in D/58 when he died of wounds on 2 Nov 1916.  He is buried in Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Sgt.
Kelly    
Walter
96251
B/58
Walter Kelly was born in Leeds, Yorks, on 1 Nov 1893, to Isaac and Annie Kelly, and was baptised in the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Roscoe Place, Leeds on 8 Jun 1899.  In 1911 he was an engineer’s apprentice and by 1914 he was working as a draughtsman.  He enlisted in Leeds, aged 20, on 31 Aug 1914, and was posted initially to No.1 Depot at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and from there to 153 Battery, which became C/47 Bde RFA, part of 14 (Light) Division.  He was appointed Bdr on 1 Jan 1915 and A/Cpl on 12 Apr 1915.  Between 22 and 30 Apr 1915 he stayed in the Cambridge Hospital in Aldershot with influenza and scabies.   He embarked at Southampton with his unit on 20 May 1915, disembarking in Le Havre on 22 May 1915.   He was Mentioned in Dispatches, this being announced in the London Gazette on 1 Jan 1916.  He was appointed A/Sgt on 12 May 1916 but was then wounded in action by a shell fragment in his chest on 1 Sep 1916.  He was admitted to a Casualty Clearing Station and then transferred by Ambulance Train to a General Hospital on 3 Sep 1916.  It was obviously a fairly superficial wound since he was sent to a Convalescent Depot a week later, on 10 Sep 1916 and two days later was posted to the Base Depot, before being posted to a front-line unit, B/58, on 16 Sep 1916.   A few weeks later, on 7 Oct 1916, he was lifting a sand bag when he wrenched his back.  He was admitted to 10 General Hospital with a contused back and returned to the UK on 13 Oct 16 on board the Hospital Ship “West Australia”.  He stayed in the Military Hospital York between 19 and 27 Oct 1916.  On the day of his discharge from hospital, his award for the Military Medal was gazetted and on 4 Nov 1916 he married Edith Sunderland in Beeston Church, Leeds.  His injury kept him in the UK for the rest of the war, and he was for example at the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon between 8 Nov 1916 and 19 Mar 1917.   The following week he reverted to Cpl on relinquishing appointment as A/Sgt when he was posted to 6C Reserve Brigade on 24 Mar 1917.  A decision was taken on 17 Oct 1917 while he was at Waterloo Barracks, Aldershot, to x-ray his lumbar region to look for evidence of long-term injury.  This showed that he had actually sustained a fracture to his sacrum, not just a contusion.  Over a year later, on 28 Nov 1918, the medical officer at these barracks was puzzled as to why the injury should still be causing any difficulties to him.  He was finally discharged on 18 Feb 1919 so that he could work in a shipyard, presumably in his old civilian trade of draughtsman.  He was awarded a small pension in 1919 after he was discharged of 6 shillings per week due to 20% disablement.  In 1939 he was living with Edith in Grovehall Drive, Leeds and was working as an engineering works manager, and he probably died aged 68 in 1962. 
Dvr.
Kemlett
Mark
211654
B/58
Mark Kemlett served in B/58 according to the British Jewry Book of Honour.
Bdr.
Kendrick
   
58 Bde AC?
Bdr Kendrick was probably serving in 58 Bde Ammunition Column (shortly before it became D/58) when he witnessed Dvr William Robinson (10712) missing the 10 p.m. tattoo roll call at Leeds on 13 Jan 1915.
Dvr.
Kent
William Evan
54071
B/58
William Evan Kent was born in St Nicolas, Cardiff, Glam on 5 Apr 1899, the son of Evan and Annie Kent.  He was apprenticed on a merchant ship and enlisted on 23 Nov 1914, aged 15.  He served at Gallipoli from April 1915 and when the Entente forces were being evacuated, his boat capsized and he nearly drowned.  While stationed in Egypt he was apparently involved in “several engagements” and went to France in June 1916.  He was hospitalised for a while with trench sores and septic poisoning.  He was working as a signaller with B/58 when he was wounded and gassed while in action at Poelcapelle and died from these injuries in 3 Canadian General Hospital Boulogne on 20 Oct 1917.  He is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery. 
Gnr.
Kerr
Jonathan
81
A/58
Jonathan Kerr was born in Annan, Dumfries, in about 1886, the son of Robert and Agnes Kerr.  He worked as a groom before the war and enlisted in Leeds on 31 Jan 1915, though his service was reckoned from 29 Aug 1914.  He was absent from Milford Camp between 12 noon on 7 Jun 1915 and 11a.m. the following day, so was confined to barracks for 3 days by Maj Crozier and he forfeited 1 day’s pay.  He sailed with his battery from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915, and then sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915 for Gallipoli, landing there a week or so later.  He left Gallipoli after four weeks, on 6 Sep 1915, disembarking back at Alexandria on 12 Sep 1915.  He was still serving in 58 Bde later in the war, because he was granted proficiency pay in September 1916 and granted 10 days’ leave to the UK in September 1917, both while serving in the brigade.  
2/Lt.
Kerr
W
n/a
C/58
2/Lt W Kerr had been serving in 11 Division Ammunition Column when he was transferred to join C/58 on New Year’s Eve 1917.  He was sent on a gas course on 1 Mar 1918, returning on 10 Mar 1918, though the following month he had to retire to the wagon lines on 10 Apr 1918 following gas attacks over the previous 2 days.  From the wagon lines he was sent to No.55 Casualty Clearing Station and was struck off the strength of the brigade on 14 Apr 18 having been “wounded gas”.  He did however rejoin the brigade from Base on 13 Jun 1918 but was severely wounded in the head by a spent falling machine gun bullet on 13 Sep 1918 from efforts to shoot down an enemy plane.  He was sent to the Casualty Clearing Station.  
Whlr.Cpl.
Kettle
James
12632
A/58
James Kettle was born in about 1886.   Before the war he lived with his wife and two sons at 28, Viaduct Street, Earlestown and worked as a wagonmaker at the Viaduct Works.  He was also the captain of the Earlestown Cycling Club.  He enlisted into the Army and joined the RFA in September 1914 and was nicknamed “Spokey” by his friends in the army.  On 11 Jun 1917, 58 Bde was near Wytschaete during the Battle of Messines.  James Kettle had apparently only been back in France eight days after a period of leave when he was killed in action, aged 31.  His family received at least three letters of sympathy, one from Gunner Frederick Downall, and another from the battery second-in-command, Captain P.T. Lewis who said that James Kettle “was at the Gun line, assisting us to make a dug-out, when an enemy shell burst near him, killing him instantly.”  His loss was also mourned by his battery commander who regarded him as a “real good craftsman and a very faithful soldier”, even mistaking him for a pre-war regular soldier.  He is buried in Wytschaete Military Cemetery.
Whlr.
Key
Arthur
83002
 
Arthur Key sailed with 58 Bde from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915.  On 21 Jul 1915, a week after arriving in Alexandria, he was tried by General Court Martial for the offences of breaking out of barracks, disobedience and drunkenness.  He was sentenced to 6 months’ hard labour which was commuted to 21 days of Field Punishment No.2.
Sgt.
Kibble
John D
29826
 
Sgt John D Kibble was posted to join 58 Bde on 17 Sep 1916.  He died on 22 May 1918, probably while being treated in one of the several hospitals in Rouen.  He is buried in St Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.  
2/Lt.
Killeen
Edmund  
n/a
A/58
Edmund Killeen enlisted into the Royal Army Medical Corps as a Private (service number 1873) and was sent to France in January 1915.  Later in the war he applied for a commission and was commissioned into the RFA as a 2/Lt in the Special Reserve of Officers on 9 Feb 1918, having attended an Officers’ Cadet Unit.  He served in 11 Division Ammunition Column, and was posted from there to join A/58 on 28 Apr 1918, though was transferred into B/58 very soon afterwards.  He and three NCOs were sent on a 10 day course at the Reserve Army Artillery School on 6 May 1918, and on 31 May 1918 he was in charge of a gun which had been taken up just behind the trenches to bombard the German rear positions, as the gun was being withdrawn on a light railway at dawn, the train de-railed leaving the gun exposed to the enemy.  Edmund ran about 2 miles back to fetch a limber at the gallop, and safely managed to get gun and crew to safety.  He was praised by his battery commander for a “very smart piece of work”.   He went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 31 Oct 1918, returning a week after the Armistice on 18 Nov 1918.  At some point he transferred from A/58 to B/58, because he was serving in that battery when he was granted further 14 days’ leave to the UK on 25 Feb 1919.  He led a party to the Bessemer Dump on 31 Mar 1919, returning 18 Apr 1919.  He was promoted to Lt on 9 Aug 1919 and resigned his commission on 1 Apr 1920.
Lt.
King
N  
n/a
 
Lt N King was serving in 58 Bde when he went on 7 days’ leave to Paris on 8 Jul 1918.  
Gnr.
King    
Fred
99573
HQ
Fred King was a member of the HQ of 58 Bde when he was awarded the Military Medal (MM) on 22 Dec 1916.  The following month, he and at least 6 others from the brigade were sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917, and his award of the MM was gazetted on 19 Feb 1917.  At some point after that, he appears to have transferred to the Royal Engineers with a new service number (311068).
Cpl.
King    
Henry John
10583
B/58
Henry John King was from Wincanton.   After joining the RFA he was first posted overseas to Egypt where he arrived on 14 Jul 1915.  He was serving with B/58 in the Ypres salient as a Bdr when he was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field on 11 Oct 1917, the award being gazetted on 12 Dec 1917.  
Whlr.
Kleiter
Fred
10568
B/58
Fred Kleiter was born as Fritz Heinrich Kleiter in Birmingham on 30 Oct 1888, to Ulrich and Agnes Collins Kleiter.  Before the war he worked as a motor engineer in Coventry. When he enlisted in Rugby on 5 Sep 1914, aged 25, he had anglicised his name to Fred and gave his father’s name as William (his mother having died in 1894).  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there was posted as a gunner to 185 Bty on 10 Sep 1914, which became B/58.  During the period of his training in Leeds he was treated in the Military Hospital, Leeds, for tonsillitis in November 1914 and for gonorrhoea and soft chancre between 17 Jan and 1 Mar 1915.  He was also hospitalised in Lichfield Military Hospital with a “mild case” of scarlet fever between 27 Mar and 23 Apr 1915.  While training at Milford, he attended the workshops at the Ordnance College at Woolwich where he was successfully tested for proficiency as a Wheeler on 9 May 1915 and was assessed as being “skilled”.  He was therefore appointed Wheeler on 29 Jun 1915, just before he sailed with the brigade for Egypt and then Gallipoli.  He landed on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915, where he served until he was hospitalised with dysentery on 11 Dec 1915 and transferred to St George’s Hospital, Malta on 17 Dec 1915.  After his recovery, he sailed on the Hospital Ship “Bornu” from Malta on 26 Jan 1916 for Alexandria and he re-joined 58 Bde on 7 Feb 1916.  He went with his unit to France and was hospitalised with conjunctivitis between 9 and 15 Feb 1917 in 34 Field Ambulance.  Very soon after he was back in hospital, now with influenza, between 22 Feb and 15 Mar 1917 in 2/2 West Riding Field Ambulance.  He was granted leave to the UK between 8 and 18 May 1917 and left 58 Bde when he was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 25 Jun 1917 with whom he remained for the rest of his time in the Army.  He was reclassified for Class I proficiency pay on 1 Jul 1918 and his pay was increased to 4d per day from 5 Sep 1918.  He was granted further leave to the UK between 3 and 17 Jan 1919 (and so was entitled to 14 days’ ration allowance) and was demobilised during that period of leave, going to No.3 Dispersal Unit, Clipstone, on 17 Feb 1919, and being demobilised on 1 Mar 1919.  He applied for a pension due to partial loss of sight in both eyes – which he described as atrophy of the retina – but his claim was rejected.  At some point after the war, he married Kathleen, who in 1939 was a housewife.  He returned to work in the motor industry after the war, working as a supervisor at Triumph’s crankshaft shop at Canley, near Coventry.  He retired in 1948.
Dvr.
Knighton
Thomas Alfred
182707
 
Thomas Alfred Knighton was born in Raunds, Northants, in about 1888, the son of John Loweth and Mary Ann Knighton.  He worked as a leather dresser in Rushden, Northants, before the war.  In October 1918 he was recorded as serving with 58 Bde so was entitled to a vote by proxy in elections in his home town of Rushden.
Gnr.
Knox
Richard James
86448
C/58
Richard James Knox was born in about 1893, the son of George Knox, a boilermaker.  Before the war he worked as a labourer and on 23 Nov 1913, he married Ethel Beatrice Donnellan in St Peter’s church, Liverpool.  He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war and was serving in C/58 when he was killed in action on 21 Oct 1916.  He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.  Sadly, Ethel died two years later, on 9 Oct 1918.  
Lt. Col.
Kuper
Charles Victor Bremer
n/a
OIC
Charles Victor Bremer Kuper was born on 24 May 1855 in South Brent, Devon, the son of Augustus Leopold and Emma Margaret Kuper.  He was commissioned into the Royal Artillery and was made a Lt on 12 Feb 1874.  He was posted to Ceylon [Sri Lanka] and played for the Colombo Cricket Club in a match between Colombo and Up-Country in 1875.  He served in the Afghan War (1878-79) in 8/11 RA though was not entitled to a campaign medal.  On 27 Mar 1883 he married Clementina Maud Lambe in St John’s Church, Ivybridge, Devon.  They had two daughters: Gwendoline Maud Victoria Kuper and Vera Kuper.  Later that year he was promoted to Capt on 31 Aug 1883.  In 1887 he was Aide de Camp to the commander of the Meerut District, India, and he was promoted to Major on 29 May 1891.  In 1892 he was in India at Nusseerabad [Nasirabad], India.   He was promoted to Lt Col on 15 Mar 1900.  During the Second Boer War he served on the Staff in South Africa as Officer Commanding Remounts at the Remounts Depot, Durban from 22 June 1902, having disembarked in Port Elizabeth in January 1902.  He returned to the UK on the “Carisbrooke Castle” on 5 Mar 1902.  He was awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal with clasp for his service.   He retired on retired pay, and in 1908 he appears to have abandoned Clementina.  He was recalled from the Reserve of Officers for service during the Great War as officer commanding 58th Brigade, Royal Artillery, 11th (Northern) Division.  It is possible he was their first commanding officer, and was certainly in charge in February 1915.  However, the following month Clementina filed for divorce on 31 Mar 1915, citing adultery because Charles was living with another woman in Leeds, which is where Charles was based training his unit.  Charles was replaced as CO of the brigade at about this time, probably due to the scandal.  Clementina was granted a decree nisi on 27 Jul 1915, and subsequently in 1918 she and her two daughters changed their names to Cupar.  Having obtained the divorce, Charles married Marion E W Williams in 1916 in Steyning, Sussex, and he was appointed to the Staff on 24 Aug 1917, relinquishing the appointment in February 1919.  He died in 1934 in Bristol.  
Sgt.
Lamb
Albert Wilson
75120
C/58
Albert Wilson Lamb was born in about 1891 in Burton Pidsea, Yorks, the son of John and Emily Mary Lamb.  Before the war the family had moved to Hull and Albert worked as an electric crane driver in an oil refinery.  He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war and was serving in C/58 when he and five others were killed in action on 25 Aug 1917, aged 26.  He is buried alongside them in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.
2/Lt.
Lanktree
Barnaby Joseph
n/a
B/58
Barnaby Joseph Lanktree was born in Dublin in about 1892, the son of Barnaby Dane Lanktree and Mary Josephine Lanktree (née Fogarty).  He sailed from Liverpool on 6 Mar 1909, aged about 18, to Buenos Aires, describing himself as a farmer.  After war was declared, he returned to the UK and obtained a commission as a 2/Lt (on probation) in the Special Reserve on 18 Oct 1915.  He was posted to France on 15 Jan 1916.  At some point he was assigned to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) because on 27 Sep 1916 he was posted from there to join B/58.  He returned to 11 DAC on 2 Dec 1916.  He was awarded the Military Cross which was gazetted on 17 Sep 1917.  It was awarded “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when working on a dump which was set on fire by heavy hostile shelling. Although repeatedly knocked down and severely burnt by explosions, he succeeded in extinguishing the fire, thereby saving a large quantity of ammunition and considerable loss of life. He displayed the greatest gallantry and determination, as he has also done on several occasions when getting ammunition forward under trying circumstances.”  He was promoted to A/Capt on 15 Sep 1917 but returned to Lt “on ceasing to command a section of a DAC” on 22 Dec 1917.  On 18 Jan 1918, he returned to Argentina, sailing from Swansea bound for Buenos Aires.  He was aged 26 and described himself now as a rancher.  He formally resigned his commission on 14 Dec 1918.  He died in 1940 in Argentina. 
2/Lt.
Lawrence
F
   
2/Lt F Lawrence joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from Base on 12 Sep 1917, and was posted to 58 Bde the following day.  
Dvr.
Lawson
Alfred
115944
D/58
Alfred Lawson was born on 17 Jan 1897 in Seacombe, Cheshire, the son of George and Isabella Lawson.  After his mother died in 1904, his father remarried.  Alfred worked as a pawnbroker’s assistant before the war and enlisted in late 1915, aged 18.  He was serving in D/58 when he was wounded, dying of his wounds on 21 Jun 1917, aged 20.  He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France.
Gnr.
Lawson
David
93424
A/58
David Lawson was born in Peebles in the Scottish Borders, in about 1892, the son of Andrew Lawson.  He was a member of the Boy Scouts and before the war worked as a motor mechanic with Peebles Motor Company.  He enlisted in Dundee in August 1914, aged 22, and served, probably with A/58, at Suvla Bay, Egypt and in France.  On the morning of 9 Apr 1917, he was one of A/58’s signallers working in the signallers’ shed during a British barrage in preparation for an attack, when a German shell fired in retaliation hit the shed.  He was dug out and his wounds “appeared not to be very bad”, his fellow signallers being miraculously unhurt.  He was evacuated and admitted to a hospital in Boulogne from which he sent his parents a field post card, stating that he had been admitted to a hospital in France suffering from wounds due to the explosion of a shell.  His parents subsequently heard that he had been transferred back to the UK and been admitted to the Ontario Military Hospital, Orpington, Kent.  The hospital alerted his parents that he had taken a sudden and dangerous turn for the worst, so they hurried from Peebles to Kent to be with their son.  Sadly, they arrived too late, he having passed away on 17 Apr 1917.  His parents had his remains transferred back to his home town and he was buried in Peebles Cemetery on 21 Apr 1917.  Amongst those who attended his funeral were wounded soldiers from the Military Hospitals at Morelands and Kingsland, and by large number of Boy Scouts.  His coffin was carried by wounded members of the Royal Artillery.
Gnr.
Leadbeater
Frederick 
11104
B/58
Frederick Leadbeater was from Birmingham and he enlisted early in the war.  He was the son of Arthur and Adelaide Leadbeater and he worked as a carter in the London and North West Railway goods depot before the war.   He was serving in B/58 and manning one of its guns on 29 Oct 1916 when a shell from a German 5.9″ howitzer scored a direct hit on the gun.  He, Gnr David Lloyd (99731) and Gnr Sylvester McCreath (104730) were killed instantly, while Cpl Thomas Gadsby (91064) was badly wounded, dying a little later.  The three gunners are buried alongside each other in Courcelette British Cemetery.    
Dvr.
Leathard
Frederick Thomas
109178
A/58
Frederick Thomas Leathard was born in Wylam, Northumberland in 1895, the son of Thomas and Margaret Leathard (née Yielder).  Before the war he worked in London as a boy clerk in the Civil Service and for Barclays Bank in Berwick-on-Tweed as a clerk.  He enlisted in late 1915 in Berwick-on-Tweed.  He was serving in A/58 on 25 Aug 1917, when he and six comrades – Gnr Alec Armitage (152294), Gnr John Barber (91942), Gnr Howard Denley (74517), A/Bdr William Monks (67578), Gnr Arthur Noble (L/5762) and Gnr Herbert Taylor (141267) – were killed.  He was 22 years old.  He is buried alongside his comrades in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium.  
2/Lt.
Leder
Louis Alfred de Lorme
n/a
B/58
Louis Alfred de Lorme Leder was born on 31 Jan 1892 in Fisherton Anger, Alderbury, Wilts, the son of Charles John and Fanny Caroline Leder (née Delorme).  He was educated at the Strand School, King’s College, London, and then in September 1908 he went to the Battersea Polytechnic Secondary School, where he was initially offered a Pupil Teachership though this was withdrawn due to his conduct and it appears he may have been expelled.  He worked as an accountant with the Canadian General Finance Ltd and enlisted into the Territorial Force on 4 Mar 1913, becoming a trooper in A squadron of the City of London Yeomanry (the “Rough Riders”) with service number 2056.  When war was declared, he was embodied on 5 Aug 1914 and he was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt into the RFA on 15 Dec 1914 and was assigned to 11 Division Artillery, joining B/58 on 3 Jan 1915.  He left the brigade a couple of months later, going to 2a Reserve Brigade on 19 Mar 1915 and then to 9 Reserve Battery.  He was posted to France on 25 Jun 1915 and was promoted to Lt on 15 Mar 1916.  He sailed from Marseilles to Bombay on 16 Sep 1916, arriving exactly three months later on 16 Dec 1916, and appears to have served with 80th Anti Aircraft Section in Mesopotamia for the next 2 years.  He was appointed A/Capt when he commanded the unit between 5 Jul and 18 Dec 1917, and again from 28 Dec 1917 until he was promoted to Capt on 26 Apr 1918.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches, which was gazetted on 27 Aug 1918.  On 16 Jan 1919 he joined the Field Cashier Military Accounts in Poona [Pune] and spent time with them also in Rawalpindi and Lahore before being admitted to hospital in Lahore on 6 Jun 1919, after which he was given a medical certificate entitling him to 3 months leave in Simla from 31 Jul 1919.  He returned to the UK on board the HT “Prince Ludwig”, sailing from Bombay on 16 Nov 1919 and went to the Officers’ Dispersal Unit in London on 2 Dec 1919 where he relinquished his commission.  In 1920 he married Marjorie Robinson and they had three children:  Mary, born in 1922, Elizabeth, born in 1927 and John, born in 1928.  It is not clear when he joined the RAF, but he was serving with them as a Flying Officer in the 1920s working in at least the Motor Transport Repair Depot and in the Accountant Branch.  He retired from the RAF as a Squadron Leader in 1938 but was presumably recalled when the Second World War started.  On 13 Aug 1940 he was serving at RAF Andover when it was bombed by the Luftwaffe who believed it to be a bomber station.  Leder was one of two people killed in the raid when 12 bombs were dropped badly damaging the station headquarters building and the officers’ quarters.  He is buried in Penton Mewsey churchyard.  
Bdr.
Lee
Sidney George
11239
B/58
Sidney George Lee was born in Taunton in about 1895, the son of Thomas Lee, an engine driver with Great Western Railways (GWR), and his wife, Mary Ann Lee.  The family moved to Bristol and Sidney worked as a train recorder in the traffic department of GWR.  He enlisted early in the war was serving in B/58 when he was killed in action on 1 Dec 1915 at Gallipoli, aged 20.  Sidney is commemorated on the Helles Memorial and was the first of three brothers to be killed in the war.
2/Lt.
Lennox
W M
n/a
C/58
2/Lt W M Lennox was from Kilmarnock and gained a commission in the Territorial Force (TF).  He joined the brigade on 19 Jan 1917 and was assigned to C/58, but left shortly afterwards, when he was posted to the Divisional Ammunition Column on 27 Jan 17.  He was promoted to Lt on 30 Aug 1917, with precedence from 1 Jul 1916, and on 10 Nov 1917 it was announced that he, and many other TF officers, would be granted the pay and allowances of his rank of Lt as from 1 Jul 1917.  He was appointed an A/Capt on 22 Dec 1917 and reverted to Lt on ceasing to command a section of a DAC on 20 Jan 1919.
Gnr.
Lerway
Reginald Robert
11167
B/58
Reginald Robert Lerway was born in 1895 in Clifton, Bristol, the son of Thomas William and Rosina Lerway.  He was apprenticed to a Tailor and Outfitter and was working as a shop assistant when he enlisted in the Colston Hall, Bristol on 4 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there to 185 Bty on 10 Sep 1914, which became B/58.  He sailed with his battery from Devonport on 1 July 1915, and after a few days in Alexandria sailed for Gallipoli.  Within a day or so of arriving at Gallipoli, he was injured when he fractured his left tibia while moving one of the guns on 12 Aug 1915.  He was admitted to 14 Casualty Clearing Station, and then evacuated first to Mudros and then back to the UK on “HS Soudan” on 24 Aug 1915.  On arrival back in the UK, he was admitted to the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, Hants on 4 Sep 1915.  He was posted to 5C Reserve Brigade on 9 Sep 1915, and was admonished twice, on 7 Nov and 17 Dec 1915, for overstaying leave by a few hours.  After his recovery, he was posted to join 9 Division Ammunition Column on 13 Jan 1916 and from there he joined C/51.  He went for demobilisation on 8 Feb 1919.  After the war, he married Daisy Matilda Derrick in 1937 and they had one daughter.  He died in Bristol in 1957, aged 62.  
Dvr.
Lewis
Alfred
120469
D/58
Alfred Lewis was born in Honor Oak, Kent in 1892, the son of John William and Emma Lewis.  He worked as a fruiterer’s assistant before the war.  He enlisted in London in late 1915 and was serving in D/58 when he was helping get a wagon out of a ditch on 23 Aug 1918.  During that an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on the party seeking to get it out, killing him and 9 others.  He died aged 26 and is buried in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, Belgium.
Cpl.
Lewis
William Stephen Stewart 
11163
B/58
Born on 17 Nov 1886 in Bristol, William Stephen Stewart Lewis was the son of William H and Elsie Lewis.   Aged 14, he worked as a machinist making boots, then later as a stationer with Bennett Brothers, Counterslip Works, Bristol.  At some point in that time, he served in the Territorial Force with the 3rd Gloucestershire Volunteers.  Shortly after the war broke out, he enlisted in Bristol Recruiting Office No.2 on 4 Sep 1914 and joined the RFA.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there to 185 Bty on 10 Sep 1914.  He married Elsie Marion Rowlands on 26 Dec 1914 in St Agnes Parish Church, Bristol.  This resulted in negotiations over the next couple of months as to whether she should get a separation allowance from the War Office.  In support of his case, he obtained letters from a City Missioner and from his previous employers, Bennett Brothers, confirming his intention to marry, and both 2/Lt Borthwick and Maj Meyricke also wrote in support.  Although it is unclear if the allowance was granted, he seemed to have a good case.   He appears to have been assigned to D sub-section in B/58 and was appointed A/Bdr on 5 Feb 1915, then promoted to Bdr six days later on 11 Feb 1915 and was promoted to Cpl on 20 Apr 1915.  He was transferred to D/58 on 7 May 15.   He sailed with his battery from Devonport on 4 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 18 Jul 1915, then re-embarked in Alexandria on 1 August 1915 before arriving in Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.   On 4 Dec 1915 he was appointed A/Sgt and posted to C/58 to replace Sgt Steele (93425) who was sick.  After evacuation to Egypt, he too fell sick with pyorrhoea and so was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance at El Ferdan on 15 May 1916 and was transferred the next day to 31 General Hospital, Port Said.  He left 58 Bde at this point and was transferred to the Base Depot at Sidi Bishr on 20 May 1916, and then to B/116 on 20 Aug 1916.  He went to the Salonika Front but was soon ill again, this time with malaria in Salonika on 2 Nov 1916, and after a period in hospital went to No.2 Convalescent Camp on 24 Nov 1916, then to G B Depot on 6 Jan 1917.  On 10 Jan 1917 he returned to 116 Bde and was promoted Sgt on 11 Oct 1917.  He was posted to 3A Reserve Brigade on 14 Oct 1918 and was then sent to the Dispersal Centre at Chiseldon for demobilisation on 31 Jan 1919.  He was awarded a pension of 6/6 from 2 Mar 1919 due to a 20% disability caused by the malaria.  He was described as being of very good character.  In 1939, he and Elsie were living back in Bristol where he did heavy work as a checker in a paper warehouse.  
2/Lt.
Lewis  
Percy Tyson
n/a
D/58
Percy Tyson Lewis was born in Cape Town, South Africa, on 2 Oct 1884.  He studied at Oxford University and before the war was a barrister in Cape Town.  He played 1st class cricket for Western Province as a batsman, and was nick-named “Plum”, and he played in a single Test Match for South Africa in December 1913 but was out for a duck in both innings.  After war broke out, he gained a commission in the RFA, being made a 2/Lt on probation in the Special Reserve of Officers on 16 Aug 1915.  Shortly afterwards, he was posted out to Gallipoli, sailing from Devonport on 12 Oct 1915 and arriving at Gallipoli on 26 Oct 1915, where he joined D/58.  After the withdrawal, he arrived in Alexandria on New Year’s Day 1916 and on 23 Feb 16 he was confirmed in rank.  At some point he must have transferred from D/58 to A/58 before D/58 left the brigade in April 1916, because he was serving in A/58 in France when Capt Hutton arrived in late July 1916 to take over as the new battery commander, Hutton praising Lewis as an “excellent fellow”.  On 10 Aug 1916, he was acting as Forward Observing Officer (FOO) in the trenches in front of Agny when he put out a bomb store which had caught fire after a shell landed in the trench.  He got away and bound up a wounded man and extinguished the fire on his own.  He and the other FOOs had a very bad time on 27 Sep 1916 but did “very good work” and he was awarded the Military Cross, the award being made on 10 Oct 1916 and the citation reading “For conspicuous gallantry.  When acting as FOO he heard that a shell had ignited some smoke bombs, and at once went to the spot.  A private with him was wounded by the explosion of a detonator, but, after binding up his wound, he returned to the fire, pushed away into safety a bag of hand grenades, and finally extinguished the fire with sandbags.”  A few days after the award, on 14 Oct 1916, he was slightly wounded in the head from a high explosive shell when acting as FOO during an attack on the Schwaben redoubt – a large piece of shell went through his helmet and made a nasty wound over his eye.  He went off to the Base Hospital (7 Stationary Hospital) the following day but was back with the battery on 8 Nov 1916.  In late October 1916, he spent three nights working without rest and went off on 23 Nov 1916 to attend a course at Larkhill followed by some leave, returning to the battery on 24 Dec 1916.  He was made A/Capt while second in command of A/58 and in that capacity wrote a letter of sympathy to the family of Wlr Cpl James Kettle after he was killed on 11 Jun 1917.  He was Mentioned in Dispatches on 18 May 1917 and was granted a few days’ leave in Paris along with 2/Lt Atwill in mid May 1917.  He had further leave from 30 Jun 1917, during which he was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917 and a few days later, on the 10th, he went to be liaison officer with the infantry.  He had a few more days leave in Paris, returning on 18 Aug 1917.  On 29 Sep 1917, he was observing from the top of a house when it was hit by a shell.  Besides being badly wounded in the left leg, he also fell some 20 feet to the ground, landing on his head.  He was evacuated to 3 General Hospital and so left the brigade, relinquishing his rank of A/Capt with effect from 1 Oct 1917 due to ceasing to be send in command of a battery.  He was evacuated to the UK on AT “Warilda” on 2 Nov 1917 and was admitted to 5 London General Hospital.  He was still being treated for his wounds over a year later at the Lady Carnarvon’s Hospital, London.  As a result of his injury, his left leg was about 2” shorter than his right leg, so he was advised by his surgeon to get a pair of specially-made surgical boots, for which he reclaimed the cost from the War Office.  He was examined by a Medical Board on 22 Mar 1920 who determined that he should be retired on medical grounds, which took place with effect from 1 Apr 1920 and so he was placed on the Retired List on account of ill health caused by his wounds.  He sailed back to South Africa on SS “Balmoral Castle” on 4 Jun 1920 and returned to being a barrister.  He visited the UK at least once more, arriving in Southampton on board the “Kenilworth Castle” on 18 Jun 1934. He died on 30 Jan 1976 in Durban, South Africa, aged 91. 
A/Bdr.
Lipsett  
Joseph
22201
D/58
Joseph Lipsett was born in Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, in about 1894.  His family moved to Clydebank, Dunbartonshire, and he enlisted there on 7 Sep 1914, aged 20.  He had been working as a brass moulder.  He was posted initially to No.6 Depot at Glasgow and from there to 253 Battery in Swanage on 30 Oct 1914, which became A/81 on 12 Jan 1915.   He went to France in July 1915 and was wounded on 3 Nov 1916.  He was serving in D/58 as an A/Bdr when he was passed as a 2nd class signaller by XIII Corps school on 22 Mar 1917.  He was subsequently appointed A/Cpl/Signaller and was awarded the Military Medal.        
Gnr.
Livesey    
Peter
34644
A/58
Peter Livesey was from Wigan.  He was serving as a gunner in A/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for “gallantry in the field” on 12 Jul 1918.  
Gnr.
Lloyd
David John
99731
B/58
David John Lloyd was born in Grangetown, Yorks, in about 1891, the son of William and Margaret Lloyd.   In 1911 he was working in a steel rail mill.   He enlisted in South Banks, Yorks, in about September 1914, and was probably assigned to 58 Bde.  He was serving in B/58 and manning one of its guns on 29 Oct 1916 when a shell from a German 5.9″ howitzer scored a direct hit on the gun.  He, Gnr Frederick Leadbeater (11104) and Gnr Sylvester McCreath (104730) were killed instantly, while Cpl Thomas Gadsby (91064) was badly wounded, dying a little later.  The three gunners are buried alongside each other in Courcelette British Cemetery, France.    
Bdr.
Loader
William George
62538
D/58
William George Loader was born in Henley, near High Ham, Somerset, in about 1892, the son of John and Rose Anna Loader.  By 1901 the family had moved to Penarth, Glamorgan.  Willie, as he was known, may have been a pre-war regular or territorial soldier since he went to France in August 1914.   He was serving in D/58 when he was killed in action on 17 Nov 1916, aged 24.  After his death his officer, 2/Lt R S Blaker wrote to tell his parents of the news.  In reply, Rose Loader wrote “Your letter conveying the sad news of the death of my dear son, Willie, duly received and it is with a broken heart that I thank you for your kindness and sympathies offered by yourself and his comrades.  It is terribly hard to hear that he has met his death after being out in the midst of the fighting right from the commencement of this sad and terrible War.  Willie was my only living boy and it is very hard to think that he has been taken away from me without seeing his dear face once again.  It is a great consolation to me to know that he passed away free from all pain”.   Willie Loader is buried in Courcellette British Cemetery, France.
2/Lt.
Lockhart  
Leslie Keith 
n/a
D/58
Leslie Keith Lockhart was born on 5 Jun 1897 in Sidcup, Kent, the son of Edwin and Annie Lockhart.  After studying at the Royal Military Academy, he was commissioned as a 2/Lt on 28 Jul 1915 and went to France on 26 Nov 15 with 118 Bde RFA.  He was serving in 461 (Howitzer) Battery, also known as C/118 (Howitzer) Bde, when that battery transferred to become the new D/60 at Croiselle on 15 Jul 1916.  It is not clear when he joined 58 Bde – the first definite mention of him occurs on 16 Feb 1917 when he returned to the unit from leave, but it is likely that he was one of those who transferred into 58 Bde when 60 Bde was broken up in December 1916.  He was awarded the Military Cross which was gazetted on 1 Jan 1917.  On 27 Feb 17 he found a signaller who had gone missing in action with 2/Lt Hope the previous day and brought him back to safety.  On 19 Jun 17 he was awarded a bar to his Military Cross for helping Lt Col Winter put out a fire in an ammunition dump on 2 Jun 17,  the citation reading “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in extinguishing a burning ammunition dump, aided by another officer, at great personal risk, thereby saving a large number of rounds and considerable loss of life.”   He was promoted to Lt and had some leave, returning from leave on 4 Dec 17.  He briefly acted as adjutant to the brigade in early 1918 and was sent to the 1st Corps Officers’ Rest Station on 6 Mar 1918.  He was appointed a Staff Lt (1st Class) between 28 Sep and 25 Oct 1918 and was posted to B/58 on 25 Nov 1918 though was still attached to the Royal Artillery HQ.  After the Armistice, he left the brigade on 20 Apr 1919 and went back to the UK ready for service in the RFA or RHA abroad.  However, he was “seconded whilst holding a special appointment” from 15 Oct 1920.  This probably indicates when he went to Ireland to work for British Intelligence and became part of the so-called “Cairo Gang”.  The head of British Intelligence in Ireland at the time was his former commanding officer in 58 Bde, Lt Col Winter.  During operations there Lockhart was in a car in Dublin with Lt Col Winter on 2 Jun 1921 when it was ambushed by the IRA; both he and Winter survived, though Winter’s hand was wounded.  In about 1926 he married Freda Margaret Groves.  When WW2 broke out, he was a Colonel and was sent to the US presumably in a liaison capacity and he also gave a number of well-received talks.  He returned to the UK in 1942, was appointed A/Brigadier on 4 Sep 1943, and by 1945 was Deputy General Officer Commanding Anti-Aircraft Units 21st Army Group, North-West Europe.  He was awarded the CBE on 24 Jan 1946 for services in North West Europe and was awarded the Legion of Merit (Degree of Officer) by the US President on 23 May 1947.  Between May 1951 and his retirement from the Army in December 1952, he commanded 54th (East Anglian) Division.  He passed away on 27 Mar 1966 in New Zealand, where he is buried.
Maj.
Lodge    
Hugh Robert
n/a
OIC A/58
Hugh Robert Lodge was born on 8 Apr 1891 in India, where his father worked as the Inspector General of Forests, Hyderabad.  He was educated at Ovingdean Hall and at Marlborough College (Sept 1904 to Dec 1909) and then attended the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, as a gentleman cadet from 1911.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 20 Jul 1911 and was posted to 10 Bty RFA in India, serving in Secunderabad, Allahabad and Barrackpore [Barrackpur], India, between November 1911 and July 1915.  During this period, he was promoted to Lt on 20 Jul 1914.  He arrived in the Egyptian theatre of war on about 20 Jul 1915, serving in 368 Bty RFA, which was part of 147 Bde, 29 Div, and served with them at Gallipoli from 23 Jul to 25 Sep 1915, during which he was made a temporary Capt on 12 Sep 1915. He served briefly then with “B” Bty RHA at Gallipoli between 26 Sep and 8 Nov 1915, before returning to 29 Div and joining 13 Bty, 17 Bde RFA for a few days between 9 and 14 Nov 1915.  He was then posted on 15 Nov 1915 to join D/60, 11 Div, all the while still at Gallipoli and he remained with them during their withdrawal from the peninsular and their service in Egypt.  He sailed for France, arriving on about 8 Jul 1916, possibly still with D/60.  He was promoted to Capt on 8 Aug 1916 when he also appears to have left France, not returning until 13 Jul 1917.  A week later, on 20 Jul 1917 he was appointed an A/Maj while commanding a battery.  In 1918 he was serving with A/331 (formerly known as 2/II East Lancs Bde), 66 Div, when he was awarded the Military Cross “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  Throughout ten days’ fighting this officer commanded his battery with skill and determination, time after time bringing it out of action after inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy, firing over open sights up to the last moment.  His reports were of great use, and he many times reported in person when all communications were cut, coming in at great personal risk under intense fire of all descriptions.”  The award may have been given for the role the unit played during the German Spring Offensive in 1918, when the 66th Division was heavily involved in the Battle of St Quentin and the British retreats.  His award was gazetted on 16 Sep 1918. And a bar to his MC was gazetted on 3 Jun 1918.  At some point that year, he was wounded, and it may have been this which caused him to leave France, presumably to return to the UK on 2 Apr 1918.  He returned to being a Capt on 17 Oct 1918, but a few days later, on 22 Oct 1918 he joined 58 Bde and was attached to A/58 in preparation for assuming command of that battery.  He went to the wagon lines at Anzin St Aubin the next day.  Instead though he stood in for Maj Baines, taking command of B/58 on 29 Oct 1918 while Maj Baines was in temporary command of 58 Bde, and I was not until the day after the Armistice, 12 Nov 1918, that he took over command of A/58 as planned.  He was officially re-appointed an A/Maj while commanding a battery from 19 Nov 1918.  While Lt Col Bedwell and Maj Baines were on leave, Lodge acted as commander of 58 Bde between 22 and 28 Nov 1918, but he re-assumed command on 1 Dec 1918, when Baines went to 11 Div HQ, until 12 Dec 18 when Bedwell returned from leave.  He had a few days leave in Paris, returning on 6 Jan 1919, but went on a 10 days’ course with the RAF the following day.  He had to go to hospital sick on 22 Jan 19, rejoining on 30 Jan 1919, but had to return to hospital sick on 17 Feb 1919 so ceased to be an A/Maj the following day and was evacuated back to the UK on 3 Mar 1919.  After the war he remained in the Army, serving amongst other appointments as Assistant Superintendent of Experiments & Experimental Staff, Shoeburyness, 27 Mar 21-23 May 22; as a Capt in 107 Bty and “V” Bty VIII Field Bde, RA; and as Maj and commanding officer of “V” Bty 1930-32.  He went onto the half-pay list from 7 Jun 1930 and retired on 17 Aug 1932.  He settled in Kenya, living at Rivelyn Estate, Naivasha and working in gold-mining.  On 8 Aug 1942, he was re-employed for war service and appointed a temporary Lt Col.  He married Joan Pauline Dear in 1948, and died aged 61 on 28 Aug 1952 in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, the probate for his will stating that he left an estate which was only worth £43.
Sgt.
Logan
   
B/58?
Sgt Logan was probably serving in B/58 on 21 Sep 1914 when he witnessed Dvr Richard Semple (93493) being absent from parade while training at Leeds.
Dvr.
Lomas
Fred
136285
 
Fred Lomas enlisted on 27 Feb 1916.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 6 Mar 1919 as being no longer fit for active service due to wounds he had received.  
Capt.
Lowther  
H
n/a
D/58
Capt H Lowther “late of D/58” rejoined 58 Bde on 2 Jun 1918 from 6 Divisional Artillery and was appointed 2nd in Command of D/58.  He was granted 14 days’ special leave to the UK from 18 Jul 1918, returning on 3 Sep 1918.  During the advances of the “100 Days”, he was appointed as one of the officers to lead a mobile battery on 26 Aug 1918.  After the Armistice, he went to the UK on 22 Dec 1918 with a group of men being sent home for demobilisation and after he handed them over he had another period of 14 days’ leave.  He left 58 Bde on 10 Mar 1919 when he and Lt Castle were posted to 49 Divisional Artillery.  
Sgt.
Lynch
Joseph
104930
HQ
Joseph Lynch was born in Kirkdale, Liverpool, on 18 Sep 1889, the son of Joseph and Catherine (Kate) Lynch.   In 1911 he was living as the head of a household which included three of his younger siblings and he was working as a railway clerk.  He enlisted on 4 Aug 1915 in Liverpool into the RFA giving his next of kin as his younger sister, Frances.  This was not his first military service – he had previously served 4 years in the King’s Liverpool Regiment before being discharged on 9 May 1912.  He was posted initially to the depot in Preston on 7 Aug 1915 and went quickly through 2nd and then 4th Reserve Brigades before embarking after only a few weeks at Portsmouth on 16 Sep 1915 to serve overseas.  He disembarked at Gallipoli and was posted to D/58 on 7 Oct 1915.  While there, he contracted dysentery and was evacuated on SS “Folkestone” from Suvla Bay on 8 Dec 1915 for admission to 16 Australian Stationary Hospital, Mudros.  After recovering, he returned to 58 Bde in Alexandria on 17 Jan 1916 and was posted to HQ 58 Bde on 29 Jan 1916.  He was promoted to Bdr on 11 Feb 1916 and was admitted to hospital in Alexandria with scabies on 10 Mar 1916, being discharged back to duty a week later on 17th.  He would have travelled with his unit to France in the middle of that year and was granted 10 days’ leave on 25 Nov 1916 during which he married Mary Ann Godfrey at St Francis de Sales Church, Walton, Liverpool – the church in which he had been baptised as an infant – on 5 Dec 1916.  He was appointed A/Cpl on 7 Jun 1917 in place of Cpl George Clark 54164 who had been wounded and was confirmed in rank on 16 Jun 1917.   He was granted his first Good Conduct badge on 7 Aug 1917 and was promoted to Sgt on 11 Jul 1918 and was posted the same day to join A/58.  After the Armistice, he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in the New Year’s Honours 1919 and was Mentioned in Dispatches on 7 Jul 1919.  By then he had been demobilised, having sailed from Dieppe on 30 Jan 1919 and gone to the Dispersal Centre at Prees Heath where he was demobilised on 1 Mar 1919.   
Fitter
Lyons
Edwin
25974
 
Edwin Lyons enlisted on 7 Sep 1914 and served in the RFA as both a driver and a fitter. He had been serving with 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 13 Jul 1918 as being no longer fit for active service after having been poisoned by gas.  He is recorded as being absent from his home 474 Eccles New Road, Salford in October 1918 on the Absent Voters List so may have still been recuperating in hospital.  
2/Lt.
Macdonald
Douglas Ovenstone
n/a
 
On 18 Nov 1914, 2/Lt Douglas Ovenstone Macdonald sat on a board of enquiry.  The board investigated the accident which Dvr Frederick Chaplin (11143) had had on 9 Nov 1914, and exonerated Frederick of any blame.  
Bdr.
MacDonald
   
A/58?
Bdr MacDonald was replaced by A/Bdr Donald Forbes (1581) on 24 Feb 1917.
2/Lt.
Mackay
Frederick Horace
n/a
B/58
Frederick Horace Mackay had served in the ranks with service number 173047.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 13 Jan 1917 having attended an Officer Cadet Unit.  He went to France on 6 Mar 1917 and was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC).  He was then attached to B/58 on 15 Mar 1917, but the following month, having transferred to C/58, he was posted back to 11 DAC on 22 Apr 17.  While still serving in 11 DAC he was admitted to hospital sick on 9 Apr 1918.  He was promoted to Lt on 13 Jul 1918 and relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920.  
Gnr.
Mail
William
20985
HQ
Augustus William Mail, known as William, was born in Hull, the son of John Henry and Rose Anna Mail.  He worked as a waggoner on a farm and a farm labourer before the war and was living in Newland, Hull.  He enlisted in Hull on 6 Sep 1914, aged 24, and was posted initially to No.1 Depot, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and from there to 60 Bde RFA Ammunition Column on 12 Sep 1914.  On 22 Jan 1915, the Ammunition Column was reformed and transferred to form the new D/60.  He went abroad with D/60 and served in the Dardanelles, and after withdrawal to Egypt he, along with the rest of D/60 were posted to help form the new 11 Division Howitzer Bde (133 Bde) on 26 Apr 1916.  He was posted to the HQ of 133 Bde on 4 Dec 1916 and transferred from there to the HQ of 58 Bde.  On 27 Sep 1917 he was wounded by multiple shell fragments in his right thigh, arm, hand and chest.  He was evacuated back to the UK and spent a month in hospital in Exeter from 14 Oct to 16 Nov 1917 before being transferred to the Crediton Voluntary Aid Hospital where he stayed until 4 Feb 1918.  He was then transferred to the Voluntary Aid Organisation Temporary Hospital Exmouth for electrical treatment to help with his hand.  He could not close his hand and experienced numbness and a grip of only 19 lbs.  He was also given whirlpool treatment for the pain in his hand and forearm which appeared to be successful.  Despite the treatment, he was declared permanently unfit for military service so was discharged from the Army on 12 Jun 1918, being described as “steady, sober and hardworking”.  He died in 1955, aged 65.
2/Lt.
Manbey    
Alban Henley Olaf
n/a
A/58
Alban Henley Olaf Manbey was born on 4 Jul 1881 in Acton, Middlesex.  He married Catherine Isabella Ward in 1906, and in 1911 he described himself as a professional athlete.  He was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt in the RFA on 8 Jun 1915.  He arrived in France on 9 Jul 1916 and was soon in action, winning the Military Cross (MC), his citation reading: “For conspicuous gallantry.  With the assistance of 2 men, he dug out six men of another unit, who had been buried in a dug-out, and got them into safety.  He was working over an hour under intense shell fire.”  The award was gazetted on 14 Nov 1916.  He joined 11 Division Ammunition Column on 5 May 1917 and was posted to C/59 ten days later on the 15th.  He joined A/58 on 2 Jun 1917 but was only with them until the following day.  However, during that brief period he performed an act of courage which earned him a bar to his MC “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.”  An enemy 8” battery was bombarding A/58 and quickly set fire to 4 ammunition dumps and a gun pit and so Manbey, “showed great promptitude and courage in extinguishing a fire in a gunpit containing a large supply of shells. Though knocked down and injured by a hostile shell, he carried out his work successfully at great personal risk, and averted heavy loss of life and ammunition.” In this work he was assisted by Gunner George Meadley (10602) who was awarded the Military Medal.  Manbey’s award was gazetted on 14 Aug 1917.  He was made an A/Capt from 25 Jun 1917 and was Mentioned in Dispatches on 14 Dec 1917.  After leaving the Army, he returned to living in Essex and at some point in the following few years he changed his name by deed poll to “de Manbey”.  On his 50th birthday, 4 Jul 1932, he reached the age when he ceased to be liable for recall to military service so was removed from the Reserve of Officers.  His wife Catherine died in 1936 (they had had one son) and in 1939 he was working as a dairy farmer.  In 1943 he married Marjorie Chambers.  He died on 31 Aug 1951 in West Mersea, Essex, aged 70.
Capt.
Mann    
Edward Hamilton
n/a
A/58
Edward Hamilton Mann was born on 21 Aug 1891 in York.  In 1911 he was a Gentleman Cadet at the Royal Military Academy Woolwich and was commissioned as a 2/Lt on 23 Dec 1911.  After war was declared he disembarked in France on 20 Aug 1914 and was awarded the Military Cross in the New Year’s Honours 1916.  He was promoted to Capt on 8 Aug 1916.  He was posted to A/58 from 1st Army Artillery School on 14 Feb 1919, but left soon afterwards, being posted to 1st Army HQ on 25 Feb 1919 where he was appointed ADC to GOC First Army on 20 Mar 1919.   He was seconded for service to the Egyptian Army on 8 Jun 1919.  In 1922 he was with 6 Bde RFA at Ewshott Camp, near Aldershot, Hants.  In 1939 he was living in Chatham, Kent, with his wife Augusta, and he appeared to be working at the Army Technical School for boys enlisted into the Royal Artillery at Fort Darland, Chatham.
Gnr.
Manning
George Boyne Cecil
168801
HQ
George Boyne Cecil Manning was born on 21 Dec 1893, in Acton, West London, the son of John and Mary Ann Manning.  He worked as chief order clerk for the electrical meter manufacturer Evershed and Vignoles, Acton Lane Works, Chiswick before the war.  He enlisted on 5 Nov 1915 in London into the Territorial Force and joined initially the 3rd County of London Yeomanry with service number 2384, and then transferred to 4th Home Counties Howitzer Bde with a new service number, 1594.  He was transferred to the Regular Army on 13 Sep 1916 and was given a new service number, 168801, and shortly afterwards was posted to France, arriving there on 1 Oct 1916.  He was posted to 58 Bde on 29 Nov 1916 and joined the brigade headquarters.  The following year, he was admonished by Lt Col Winter for having disobeyed an order given to him by Lt Monks on 5 Mar 1917 and then lying about it.  A few months later he was wounded by a shell which fractured his jaw and he was evacuated to 2 Canadian General Hospital, Le Tréport, and then back to the UK on 5 Aug 1917 where he was treated at the Edmonton Military Hospital.  Towards the end of the year a Medical Board decided he was no longer fit for military service and so he was discharged from the Army on 2 Jan 1918.  He was described as being of good character and was interested in working as a clerk in Government offices.   In 1939 he was living in Croydon as a clerk in the civil service and had been promoted the previous year “from the unpensionable permanent grade of the Departmental Clerical Class” while working in the Ministry of Labour.  By 1945 he was living in Chertsey and he died in Chichester, Sussex on 17 Sep 1962.  
2/Lt.
Manson
Thomas Walter
 
A/58
Thomas Walter Manson was born on 22 Jul 1893, the son of Thomas Francis and Joan Manson, in Tynemouth, Northumberland.  In 1911 he had followed his father into teaching, working as an indentured pupil teacher for the County Borough Council.  He enlisted into the RFA on 11 Jan 1916 as a gunner and was given service number 127980).   He was posted initially to No.1 Depot at Newcastle-upon-Tyne.  Three months later while training at 4A Reserve Bde at Woolwich, he sought a commission and on 25 Apr 1916 he went to the Royal Artillery Cadet School at Topsham Barracks, Exeter.  He was commissioned on 3 Aug 1916 as a 2/Lt into the Special Reserve of Officers and was posted to D/59 on 25 Aug 1916.   While serving on the Somme with his battery, he was wounded in the right scapula by shrapnel on 9 Oct 1916 and was evacuated to the UK on HMHS “Panama”, arriving in Southampton from Boulogne on 15 Oct 1916.  A Medical Board was held at Wheatley Hall, Doncaster on 21 Dec 1916 which passed him fit.   He returned to France, arriving at Le Havre on 19 Feb 1918, and was attached to A/58 on 12 Apr 1918 from 11 Division Ammunition Column.  He was one of several officers in the brigade who were sick as of 12 May 18.  He attended 1st Army Anti-Tank School between 11 and 26 Oct 1918, and after the Armistice he went to the UK for demobilisation on 22 Jan 19 at No.1 Dispersal Unit, Ripon.  After the war he studied at Glasgow University and then at Cambridge University.  He became a renowned biblical scholar and in 1936 was appointed Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis in the University of Manchester, a position which he held until his death on 1 May 1958.  He had married Nora Wallace in 1926 who survived him.  They had no children.   He has an entry in Wikipedia.
Gnr.
Marle
William James
L/1164
 
William James Marle enlisted into the Army on 19 Oct 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 14 Aug 1918 as being no longer fit for military service due to wounds he had received.
Capt.
Marsden
James Weymouth
n/a
 
James Weymouth Marsden was born on 6 Feb 1884 in Bangalore, India, the son of James Cort and Eleanor Rosa Marsden. He attended Bedford Modern School before joining the Army and attending the Royal Military Academy Woolwich as a Gentleman Cadet. He was commissioned as a 2/Lt into the Royal Garrison Artillery on 15 Jul 1903 and was promoted to Lt on 15 Jul 1906. In 1911 he was serving with 55 Company RGA but the following year he was seconded to study Japanese from 20 Jan 1912. He was promoted to Capt on 30 Oct 1914. In early June 1915 he was serving in 58 Bde as the commanding officer of the C2 Ammunition Column and he sailed with the brigade from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915 on SS “Knight Templar” arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915. While serving at Gallipoli he left 58 Bde when he transferred into D/57, an artillery battery of 10th (Irish) Division, on 31 Oct 1915. The following year while convalescing in the Endsleigh Palace Hospital London, he married Kathleen Gresham Hall on 1 Sep 1916 in St Pancras Church London. He was appointed A/Major on 5 May 1917 and promoted to that rank on 29 Jan 1918. After the end of the war he was appointed Assistant Military Attaché (GSO 2nd Grade) on 12 Dec 1918, probably at the embassy in Tokyo since he was serving there in that role in 1920. He was seconded “for service on the Staff” on 1 May 1920 and the Japanese Emperor awarded him the Order of the Sacred Treasure 4th Class that year, the award being reported in the London Gazette on 18 Aug 1920. His knowledge of Japanese was put to use again when he joined the Government Code & Cypher School (GC&CS) in 1927 as a Junior Assistant because of his expertise in Japanese. The following year he was promoted to Lt Col on 15 Jul 1928. He published an article on “The Japanese Army” in the Journal of the Royal United Service Institution in February 1933, an abstract of which was also printed in the U.S. “Coast Artillery Journal” two months later. On his 55th birthday, 6 Feb 1939 he reached the age when he was removed from the Reserve of Officers. He was still working at GC&CS when World War 2 broke out and was working in Room 7 at Bletchley Park in December 1940. He joined Bletchley Park’s Home Guard platoon and was appointed a section commander and was still working at Bletchley in at least 1943. On 4 Oct 1950 he attended a lunch for Old Bedford Modernians in London and in 1956 he acted as Chairman to an illustrated talk given in the Victoria and Albert Museum to the Japanese Society of London by Richard Storry. James Marsden died aged 90 on 3 Oct 1974 in Tonbridge, Kent.
BSM 
Marsh 
J L
 
C/58?
During training in Milford Camp, Sgt Marsh was one of the witnesses to Gnr Cyril Smith (11256) of C/58 overstaying his leave from 12pm 2 May to 11pm 3 May 1915.  BSM J L Marsh was found guilty of drunkenness by a Court Martial held at Zahrieh Camp, Egypt, on 18 Jan 1916 so was reduced to Corporal.
Gnr.
Marshall
John  
661115
 
John Marshall enlisted into the Army on 12 Jan 1916.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 14 Aug 1918 as being no longer fit for military service following an accident.
Dvr.
Mason
George Forster
219867
 
George Foster Mason enlisted into the Army on 21 Jun 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 1 May 1919 as being no longer fit for military service due to wounds he had received.
Lt.
Masson
Eric Dartnell
n/a
D/58
Eric Dartnell Masson was a South African who fought as a Sgt in the South African Field Artillery in German South West Africa [modern day Namibia] in 1914.  He sought a commission in the British RFA and was commissioned as a 2/Lt on probation 10 Dec 1915.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1916.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column from Base on 5 Jul 1918 and was attached to D/58 a week later on 11 Jul 1918.  He was sent on a 3 week-long course for Forward Observation Officers and Signallers at the 11 Divisional Artillery school on 20 Aug 1918.  He resigned his commission on grounds of ill-health on 3 Jun 1919 and returned to South Africa where he died in 1941 in Cape Province.
Bdr.
Matheson
   
B/58?
Bdr Matheson witnessed Dvr F J Jones (11161) neglecting to obey an order while they were training in Leeds on 15 Mar 1915.
Gnr.
Mathieson  
William
104159
A/58
William Mathieson, son of George Mathieson, was a merchant’s assistant from West Aquhorthies, Inverurie, Aberdeenshire.  He enlisted into the RFA aged 19 in Aberdeen on 15 Sept 1915 and was posted initially to No 6 depot at Glasgow.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 27 Mar 1916 and sailed from Southampton on 3 Jul 1916, arriving in Le Havre the next day.  He was posted to A/58 on 29 Sep 1916 and with at least 6 other members of the brigade was sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917.  He was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK from 11 Sep 1917.  While still serving in A/58 he was reassigned as a signaller on 22 Aug 18 and was granted further leave to the UK via Boulogne between 8 and 22 Oct 1918.  After the Armistice he was appointed a paid acting L/Bdr on 22 Dec 1918 and then a paid acting Bdr on 9 Apr 1919.  He was granted further leave on 25 Apr 1919 and on 5 Jul 1919 he went for demobilisation to Kinross.  Shortly afterwards his award of the Military Medal for bravery in the field was reported in the London Gazette on 23 Jul 1919.  William Mathieson was described as extremely conscientious, reliable and hard-working by one of his officers, Lt Window.
Gnr.
Matthews
Harry
123535
A/58
Harry Matthews was the son of Henry and Emily Matthews of Tipple Hill, Woodside, Caddington, Beds.  He enlisted into the Army in about April 1916.  He was serving in A/58 when he was seriously wounded and he died in 53 Casualty Clearing Station on 17 Jun 1917 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension Nord, France.   Two of his brothers, Frederick and John were also killed in 1917 while serving in the Army.
Cpl.
Mayston
   
D/58
Cpl Mayston (possibly Elias Joshua Mayston) was posted from Base to join D/58 on 2 Dec 1916.  
Gnr.
McCaig
Charles
192653
A/58
Charles McCaig was from Dumfries and was born in about 1888.  He was married to Agnes and he enlisted in Dumfries.   He was serving in A/58 when he was killed aged 29 and he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.  
Sgt.
McCannah  
Joseph
24436
B/58
Joseph McCannah was from Manchester.  After enlisting in the RFA, he was posted to Egypt, arriving on 14 Jul 1915.  He was serving as a Sgt in B/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on 2 Oct 1917.  On 6 Aug 1918 he was a witness to Gnr Pearce (67937) fighting on parade, and at about the start of December 1918 he witnessed Cpl Baron (148993) making a complaint contrary to procedure.  
Gnr.
McCarthy
Arthur Samuel
99287
C/58
Arthur Samuel McCarthy was born in about 1896 in Northfleet, Kent, the son of Frederick and Fanny McCarthy.  He was working as a butcher’s assistant in 1911 and enlisted into the RFA in Gravesend, Kent.  He was posted to France, arriving on 15 Oct 1915.  On 25 Apr 1918, he was serving in C/58 when he was part of a party clearing up the old wagon lines of C/58 just after they had moved to a new location.  The party came under shell fire and both he and Sgt Frank Dobby (20929) were killed.  He is buried alongside Dobby in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Sgt.
McCorkindale  
Peter
33374
D/58
Peter McCorkindale was born in about 1886 in Slammanan, Stirlingshire.  In 1901, his parents were named as Alexander and Catherine Baird, so it is possible that his mother had (re)married since he was born. He became a miner and was living in Cowie, near Falkirk.  He decided to join the Army when he was 18 and enlisted on 25 Jan 1904, joining the RFA.  The following year he decided to extend his service to a total of 8 years with the colours.  He served most of these years in India, during which he was made an A/Bdr, but he reverted to Gnr after “highly improper conduct in barracks” while drunk.  With the 18 Battery RFA he took part in the engagement at Matta in April 1908.  In 1912 he had completed his 8 years and so transferred to the Reserve on 3 Feb 1912.  He had served as a battery signaller for the previous 4 years and his reference said that he was “accustomed to care of horses and harness and can both ride and drive”. He was described as suited for a job on the railways, had qualifications as a groom, in semaphore and Morse code signalling and that “he is possessed of very good abilities and is smart, intelligent and respectful.”  During his service he was awarded the India General Service Medal 1908 with North West Frontier clasp and a Good Conduct badge, first class.  After leaving the Army he decided to emigrate to Canada and sailed from Glasgow on 20 Apr 1912 for St John, New Brunswick, Canada on the SS “Cassandra”.  The following year, he married Agnes Menzies, of Humboldt, Sask., Canada, on 24 Jun 1913 in Humboldt and they had a daughter, also called Agnes, on 13 Apr 1914.  As a reservist he was recalled to serve in the RFA when war was declared and so returned to the UK, sailing on the SS “Uranium” from Quebec, arriving in Avonmouth on 16 Sep 1914.  He was mobilised at Woolwich in 4B Reserve Brigade on 18 Sep 1914 and was posted to 458 Battery, 118 Bde RFA on 8 Dec 1914 and promoted to Bdr the same day.  He went to France with his battery on 12 Mar 1915, was appointed A/Cpl on 22 Apr 1915 and promoted to that rank two days later.  He was Mentioned in Despatches on 27 Jan 1916 and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal “For conspicuous gallantry in charge of signallers.  He invariably displayed great bravery and energy in the performance of his duties, and gave a fine example to all with him”, the award being gazetted on 10 Mar 1916.  He was promoted to Sgt on 30 Jan 1916.  On 15 Jul 1916, 458 Battery was posted en masse to be the new D/58.  He was still serving in D/58 when he was killed by a German 5.9″ shell on 2 Mar 1917 as he was going down Waggon Road, near Beaumont-Hamel.  He is buried in Beaumont-Hamel British Cemetery.  His widow, Agnes, remained in Canada, living with her father in Nanaimo, BC.  Peter McCorkindale is mentioned by name in Richard Blaker’s “Medal Without Bar”.    
Gnr.
McCreath 
Sylvester 
104730
B/58
Sylvester McCreath was born in Liverpool in about 1889, the son of Sylvester and Mary McCreath (née Henigan).  He enlisted into the RFA and was serving in B/58 and manning one of its guns on 29 Oct 1916 when a shell from a German 5.9″ howitzer scored a direct hit on the gun.  He, Gnr Frederick Leadbeater (11104) and Gnr David Lloyd (99731) were killed instantly, while Cpl Thomas Gadsby (91064) was badly wounded, dying a little later.  The three gunners are buried alongside each other in Courcelette British Cemetery.
Lt.
McCusker
Hugh Joseph
n/a
A/58
Hugh Joseph McCusker was born on 4 Jul 1892 and educated at Stonyhurst College.  He was the son of Mr and Mrs J McCusker of Neilston, Renfrewshire and one of their four sons all of whom joined the Army.  While living at Neilston he applied for a commission on 19 Aug 14 at Hamilton, requesting cavalry or artillery because he had “always been among horses”.  On his service record this is crossed out and “Infantry” was written in.  He was however commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt on 22 Sep 1914 into the RFA having been a cadet in an Officers Training Corps.  He was posted to 107 Bde RFA and attended a Medical Board in January 1915 while serving with D/107.  On 4 Feb 1915 he was promoted to temporary Lt and later that year he was posted to join 58 Bde, his imminent arrival in the brigade being noted on 7 Oct 1915 while the brigade was serving at Suvla Bay.  After the unit was evacuated from Gallipoli, he disembarked in Alexandria on 29 Dec 1915 and then sailed with the brigade to France in the middle of the following year.  When Capt T J Hutton joined A/58 as the new battery commander in late July 1916, he praised Lt McCusker as an “excellent fellow” and said he and the other Forward Observation Officers had had a very bad time on 27 Sep 1916 but had done very good work. He had some leave between 9 and 24 Nov 1916 but went to hospital sick on 10 Dec 1916.   On 17 Dec 1916 he was transferred back to the UK on HMHS “Cainbrea” with varicose veins and so was struck off the strength of the brigade five days later.  He an operation on the varicose veins in his right leg and was posted in March 1917 to 6C Reserve Bde, in Radford Barracks, Edinburgh.  He was passed fit for general service on 10 Apr 1917 and returned to France.  On 10 Jun 1917 he was at the RFA Reinforcements base at Le Havre, but was sent back to the UK on the “Grantilly Castle” since he had dermatitis on his elbows, buttocks and groin, possibly caused by a parasite.  This had originally been diagnosed in April as scabies so he had been given “the usual treatment”.  By the time he arrived at the British Red Cross Hospital at Netley, he had dermatitis “all over his body” which had been “aggravated by active duty”.  Following treatment, he was due to report at 6B Reserve Bde, Edinburgh on 10 Oct 1917.  He was appointed an A/Capt while second in command of a battery on 20 Jan 1919.
Gnr.
McDougall
George
10525
 
George McDougall was born in Coventry, the son of John McDougall.  He enlisted in Coventry soon after war was declared and was serving in 58 Bde in the Ypres salient when he died on 11 Oct 1917 of wounds he had received.  He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Gnr.
McEwan
William Alexander
93198
A/58
William Alexander McEwan was born on 19 Mar 1889 in Edinburgh, the son of James and Jessie McEwan (née Henderson).  Before the war he worked as a book binder and on 26 Jun 1914 he married Lily Thornton, a bookbinder’s collator, in 13 Dryden Place, Edinburgh.  On 22 Jul 1917, he as serving in A/58 and was sitting up in his dugout with other battery members at dawn when a shell from a German 4.2″ howitzer scored a direct hit.  One of his comrades sought to hold the weight of the dugout roof on his shoulders while they were all rescued, but sadly William had died.  The others in the dugout all survived.  William died aged 28 and is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium.
2/Lt.
McGuffie
Thomas Dunlop
243532
B/58
Thomas Dunlop McGuffie was born on 30 Dec 1898 in Taungoo, Burma [Myanmar], the son of Thomas Chalmers and Janet Agnes Scobie McGuffie (née Dunlop).  The family returned to the UK and settled in Hove, Sussex.  Thomas Dunlop McGuffie was educated at Windlesham House School For Boys in Brighton and then at Charterhouse School where he served in the Officers Training Corps (OTC) for 4 years.  When he left the OTC in April 1917, his commanding officer said that he would make an efficient officer and had been trained for the infantry.  He enlisted as a cadet on 30 Jan 1917 and was granted an admission to an Officer Cadet Unit once he reached the age of 18½.  Shortly after he reached that age, he was mobilised at Brighton on 9 Aug 1917 and joined No.2 RFA Officer Cadet School at Topsham Barracks, Exeter the following day.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the Special Reserve of Officers on 6 Jan 1918 and was posted to France, disembarking at Boulogne on 28 Mar 1918.  He was posted from the Base to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 13 Apr 1918.  On 11 Jun 1918 he was posted to B/58 and on his second day in the brigade he took part in, and won, a bare-backed mule race that was open to all comers.  He went on 14 days’ leave to England on 24 Oct 1918, returning by coincidence on Armistice Day, 11 Nov 1918.  While Lt J E Norton was on leave, McGuffie stood in for him as the brigade’s Education Officer from 1 Dec 1918.  He left the brigade on 12 Jan 1919 to return to the UK for demobilisation and was disembodied at No.1 Dispersal Unit, Wimbledon on 19 Jan 1919. He relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920.  After the war he lived in Chertsey, Surrey and in London.  He married Marjorie Grinling in 1926 but he passed away on 20 Jun 1934, aged 35.  They had one child.  
Gnr.
McGuire   
George
93021
A/58
George McGuire worked as a carter from Barony, Lanarkshire, before the war.  He married Elizabeth Millar on 22 Dec 1900 though when he enlisted on 25 Aug 1914 at Glasgow, he claimed to have been born in 1886 and so was 28 years old, which would have meant that he had married at age 14.  He was posted initially to No.6 depot in Glasgow the day he enlisted and the following day was posted to 184 Battery, which subsequently became A/58.  During training George McGuire ran frequently into trouble with the military authorities: he went absent without leave overnight on 11 Oct 1914 while at Leeds for which he was confined to barracks for 8 days and forfeited 3 days’ pay, then on 8 Mar 1915 he was absent off leave and was confined to barracks for 7 days, he was again absent overnight on 5 Jun 1915 while at Milford Camp and was again confined to barracks for 7 days.  All of these punishments were awarded by his battery commander, Maj Crozier.  Going overseas did not curb his instincts: he broke out of the SS “Knight Templar” at 7pm on 14 Jul 1915 shortly after docking in Alexandria and didn’t return until 9.30pm the next evening.  For this he was fined 1 days’ pay by Lt Col Drake.  Then at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria, he was found guilty by a Field General Court Martial that on 20 Jul 1915 he had been drunk and his conduct had been prejudicial of military discipline.  The Court Martial awarded him 56 days’ Field Punishment No.2 on 22 Jul 1915.  He returned to duty on 16 Aug 1915 after the brigade had sailed for Gallipoli.  He was therefore still at Zahrieh Camp on 27 Sep 1915 when he failed to obey an order so was confined to camp for 7 days and deprived of 4 days’ pay by Capt Ashford.  He left 58 Bde when he was posted to Ras el Din Battery on 11 Dec 1915, though was then absent from their alarm parade on 22 May 1916 so was confined to camp for 14 days.  He overstayed a pass by 1½ hours on 23 Sep 1916 while at Ras el Din, so was confined to camp for a day.  He was then posted to the General Base Depot on 23 Jan 1917 and to 85 Anti-Aircraft section on 5 Jun 1917.  He returned to the General Base Depot on 21 Nov 1917 and then went to a battery in probably Calcutta on 7 Feb 1918.  He returned again to the Base Depot on 11 Jun 1918 before being attached to the Royal Garrison Artillery on 15 Aug 18.  In May 1919 he was suspected of having contracted typhoid, so he had to provide a stool sample, though the results came back negative.  He was demobilised direct from Addington Park War Hospital on 3 Aug 1919, at which point he gave his year of birth as 1872 – fourteen years earlier than the date he gave when he enlisted.  This may be because when he enlisted in 1914, if he had been born in 1872, he would have been 42 years old at a time when the maximum age for enlisting was 38.  Although he had served in several other units, when he was demobilised and thereafter he was still signing for himself as being in A/58, including in 1921 when he acknowledged receipt of his medals.  He qualified for a pension for 20% disability due to dysentery and he and Elizabeth had at least 6 children.  
A/Bdr.
McKinnie
Andrew
75067
D/58
Andrew McKinnie was born in Sunderland, County Durham, in about 1897, the son of James Bruce and Elizabeth Emma McKinnie.  In 1911 he was working, aged 14, underground in the coal mines as a trapper boy.  He enlisted into the RFA, probably underage, and was first posted to France, arriving on 11 Mar 1915.  He was serving in D/58 when he was killed in action, aged 20, on 17 Apr 1917.  He is buried in Grévillers British Cemetery, France.
Gnr.
McLean
Duncan
640162
D/58
Duncan McLean was born in Greenock, Renfrewshire, in about 1889, the son of Duncan and Agnes McLean.  He served in the Territorial Force in 2nd Highland Bde RFA and was serving in D/58 a few days before the Armistice when he was killed when his howitzer had a premature.  The gun and carriage were completely destroyed and one other man was wounded.  Duncan McLean died aged 29 and is buried in Verchain British Cemetery, Verchain-Maugré France.  
Dvr.
McLean
Neil
93026
B/58
Neil McLean was born in Barony, near Glasgow in Lanarkshire in about 1885.  He married Jessie Forbes on 23 Oct 1905 in Glasgow and they had at least 3 children.  He worked as a carter and on 26 Aug 1914 he enlisted into the RFA, aged 29.  He was posted the next day to No.6 Depot at Glasgow and was posted to 185 Battery on 14 Sep 1914, which became B/58.   While serving in the Army, Neil agreed to give a third of his Army pay to his wife, Jessie.  While training at Chapeltown Barracks in Leeds he was found smoking in the canteen on 23 Jan 1915 when he should have been on duty so he was confined to barracks for 7 days by 2/Lt Borthwick.  He went overseas on about 2 Jul 1915 and arrived in Egypt on about 15 Jul 1915.  Back in Egypt, he was posted to C/58 on 27 Jan 1916.  Two months later he was posted to the General Base Depot on 14 Mar 1916 and then to Salonika where he served in 30th Infantry Bde’s Small Arms Ammunition Column on 7 May 1916.  On 18 Aug 1916 he was posted to A/67 also in Salonika.  At some point he was declared a malaria case so it was determined that he should not be posted to a place where malaria was prevalent.  He must have been evacuated back to the UK with malaria because he stayed in 2nd Eastern General Hospital, Brighton between 29 Jul and 10 Aug 1918 with that condition.  He was posted to 4 Reserve Battery, 1B Reserve Bde, Forest Row on 8 Jul 1918, and while there got into trouble twice by overstaying leave.  Six months later, he was sent to No.1 Dispersal Unit, Georgetown, Paisley on 30 Jan 1919 for demobilisation.  On 27 Feb 1919 he was discharged from the Army, aged 35, and was awarded a small pension due to his malaria. After the war, he returned to live in Glasgow.
Sgt.
McLeod  
Daniel
93603
B/58
Daniel McLeod was born in Barony, Glasgow, in 1891, the son of Daniel and Agnes McLeod.  He was 22 and working as a van driver in Glasgow when he enlisted into the RFA on 30 Aug 1914 in that city.  He was posted initially to No.6 RFA Depot in Glasgow and from there to 33 Bde RFA on 6 Sep 1914 before being sent instead to 58 Bde to serve in 185 Battery on 14 Sep 1914.  In a surprisingly rare clerical error, there was some confusion over the service numbers he and another soldier called Donald McLeod were allocated.  Initially Daniel McLeod was given number 93478, but then he was re-attested while training at Chapeltown Barracks and given number 93603.  After 185 Battery was re-numbered as B/58, he was appointed as a paid A/Bdr in “A” sub-section of that battery on 5 Feb 1915.  He was promoted to Bdr on 2 Apr 1915 and posted later that month, on 30th to D/58.  He sailed with D/58 from Devonport on 3 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915, and after a few weeks in Egypt he sailed for Gallipoli disembarking at Suvla Bay on 12 Aug 1915.  He was appointed A/Cpl on 21 Oct 1915. After being withdrawn from Gallipoli back to Egypt, he was admitted to 17 General Hospital in Alexandria with nephritis on 21 Feb 1916 and was discharged back to duty on 8 Mar 1916. On 26 Apr 1916 D/58 was transferred to form the new A battery of the new 11 Division Howitzer Bde, which was then renumbered as 133 Bde RFA.  Along with his unit, he sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jun 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 7 Jul 1916.  He was appointed A/Sgt on 28 Jul 1916 but reverted to Cpl on 11 Oct 1916.  When A/133 was broken up to provide additional guns to other batteries, he was posted to A/58 on 29 Nov 1916.   He was appointed A/Sgt, posted back to B/58 Bde and promoted to Sgt on 17 Feb 1917.  On 26 Jun 1917 he was wounded with shell wounds to his back and side, so was admitted briefly to 108 Field Ambulance.  These appear to have been superficial wounds because he was probably discharged back to duty the same day.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK on 16 Feb 1918.  On 10 Apr 1918 he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, the citation reading “From 8 to 10 Apr 1918, the battery was very heavily shelled with mustard gas shells near Hulluch.  There were many casualties in the battery, nearly 50 per cent of the men being sent to hospital.  Although suffering from the effects of the gas he stayed on at the gun line, setting a fine example to all ranks by his cheerfulness and energy.  On many other occasions since coming to France he has shown great courage and resource under the most trying circumstances.”  Just before the Armistice, he was admitted to the 3rd South Midland Field Ambulance on 9 Nov 1918 possibly with inflammation of his left hand.  Whatever his injury was it was sufficient to cause him to still be in hospital in February the following year because he was discharged from the Dispersal Hospital Stobhill, Glasgow, on 12 Feb 1919.
Dvr.
McMillan
Alexander
11266
58 Bde AC
Born in about 1881, in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Alexander McMillan married Helen Woodfield in St Nicholas’s Church, Warwick on 16 Mar 1902.  In 1911 he was working as a gardener and on 2 Sep 1914 when he enlisted in Warwick, aged 33, he was working as a groom.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Sep 1914.  When the new D/58 was established on 21 Jan 1915 he was transferred into that battery.  He overstayed a period of leave by 3 days between 14 and 17 Mar 1915, for which he was confined to barracks for a day and forfeited 3 days’ pay.  He embarked at Devonport on 3 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking at Suvla Bay on 12 Aug 1915.  After the evacuation from Gallipoli, he arrived back in Alexandria on 17 Jan 1916.  On 26 Apr 1916, D/58 was transferred to form the new A battery of the new 11 Division Howitzer Bde, which was then renumbered as 133 Bde RFA.  When A/133 was broken up to provide additional guns to other batteries, he was posted to B/58 on 29 Nov 1916.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK with rations on 4 Dec 1917.  He served in B/58 for the rest of his service until he went for demobilisation, going to No.1 Dispersal Unit Fovant on 4 Apr 1919.  His character was described as “very good”.  He and Helen had at least five children, two of whom died in infancy.
Lt.
McNair
John Kirkland 
n/a
D/58
John Kirkland McNair was born on 21 Oct 1893 in Aylesbury, Bucks. He was the son of Henry Bingham and Sybilla McKenzie McNair (née Kirkland).  He was commissioned into the RFA and went to France with the British Expeditionary Force, arriving in France on 8 Sep 1914.  He was promoted to Lt on 9 Jun 1915 and appointed a temporary Captain while commanding a battery on 29 Apr 1916.  He ceased to command a Trench Mortar battery on 5 Aug 1916 so returned to being a Lt.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 29 Aug 1916 and was then posted to D/58 on 21 Sep 1916.  Just a month later he was operating forward of the battery when he was wounded on 22 Oct 1916 and may have left 58 Bde as a result.  He was promoted to Capt on 18 Jul 1917 and at some point returned to serving in 11 DAC because he was posted from there to 59 Bde on 8 Apr 1918 and appointed T/Major the same day.  He reverted to Capt two weeks later on 22 Apr 18 and was them appointed A/Major on 13 Jun 1918.  After the war he stayed in the Army and was posted to India where he and his wife had a daughter in Kasauli, India on 27 Oct 1920.  On 20 Jan 1928 he vacated the post of GSO 2nd Grade for the Madras District in India.  In 1939 he was a Colonel working in the General Staff in the War Office and from 3 Jul 1940 he was appointed an Acting Brigadier and served as Deputy Director of Military Operations (O), War Office.  On 10 Mar 1941 he was appointed as Brigadier Royal Artillery, Southern Command and the following year was working as Deputy Director of Organization in the War Office.  He then went to Washington in 1942 to take up the post of Brigadier General Staff at the Joint British Staff Mission.  It was probably in that capacity that he attended at least three of the conferences held between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill: the first Quebec conference (“QUADRANT”) in August 1943 and the 1st and 2nd Cairo Conferences held in November and December 1943.  He was awarded the CBE and in 1946 President Truman awarded him the Legion of Merit (Degree of Officer).  He retired from the Army on 6 Aug 1946 and was granted the honorary rank of brigadier.  He then spent several years working for the Imperial War Graves Commission, including as Director of Graves Registration & Enquiries, War Office.  Between 1954 and 1957 he served as a Conservator of Ashdown Forest in Sussex and he died in Uckfield, Sussex in 1973. 
Bdr.
McSkimming
John
84075
C/58
John McSkimming was the son of James and Mary McSkimming.  He enlisted into the RFA in Paisley, Renfrewshire and went overseas, arriving in Egypt on about 15 Jul 1915.  On 19 Apr 1918 he was serving in C/58 as a Bdr when he was replaced by Gnr E Burke (10610).  He was serving in B/155 when he was killed in action on 30 Sep 1918 and is believed to be buried in Quéant Road Cemetery, Buissy, France.
Gnr.
Meadley      
George
10602
A/58
George Meadley may have been born in 1891 in Upton Warren, Worcs and married Maud Corey on 23 Nov 1912 in Birmingham.  He enlisted into the RFA shortly after the start of the war and went, probably with 58 Bde, to Egypt in July 1915.  In 1917 he was serving in A/58 as the servant of the battery commander, Maj Hutton.  During the night of 2/3 Jun 1917, an exploding German shell started a fire in a gun pit and ammunition dump which risked setting the ammunition on fire.  George Meadley helped 2/Lt Manbey move the shells and extinguish the fire, and for this action he was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 18 Jul 1917.  On 5 Aug 1917 he was wounded and died of his wounds.  Maj Hutton commented that he was “a real good fellow and I was very sorry to lose him”.   He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium. 
Maj.
Meyricke
Rupert John Chabbert
n/a
OIC B/58
Rupert John Chabbert Meyricke was born on 19 Jun 1877, the son of Edward and Evelyn Maria Meyricke.  He was baptised in All Saints Church, Cheltenham, on 30 May 1878, and lived in Nubie House, Westal Green, Cheltenham.  Like his twin elder brothers, Edward and Robert before him, he was educated at Cheltenham College, attending there between September 1887 and December 1894.  He also followed his brothers into the Army and was a gentleman cadet at the Royal Military Academy Woolwich.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt into the RFA on 1 Sep 1897 but a year later appeared before Medical Boards on 4 Aug 1898 in London and on 9 Nov 1898 in Horfield Barracks, Bristol.  The cause was that he had had an epileptic fit in the Spring, but the boards concluded that he had not had any further since then so after the second board he was declared fit for duty.  The earlier board had speculated that the cause of his epilepsy was an injury he had suffered when he was 10 years old.  He was posted to South Africa the following year and after arriving attended another Medical Board on 28 Nov 1899 which also concluded that he was suffering from epilepsy so sent him back to the UK to recover.  His doctor in Cheltenham subsequently said that he had had no further seizures and was in robust health.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Sep 1900 and returned to South Africa to serve in the 2nd Boer War in 1902 in operations in the Cape Colony and Orange River Colony for which he was awarded the Queen’s South African Medal with three clasps.  He then went to India in early 1903 and served in “E” Battery, RHA.  But after only 6 months in India he attended a Medical Board at Mhow on 30 Sep 1903 since he was suffering from extreme debility and insomnia due to service in India, as well as attacks of malaria.  He was therefore instructed to return to the UK to recover and was described at the time as phlegmatic of character and regular of habits. He was promoted to Captain on 1 Sep 1904.  In 1907 he was serving in 56 Battery RFA when he attended two further Medical Boards, one at Devonport on 3 August and the other at Bristol on 3 December.  They concluded that he was suffering from nervous weakness accompanied by uncontrollable muscular spasms which were occurring several times a day.  The board at Bristol though concluded that he had recovered sufficiently so was “suffering from some slight undefined nervous symptoms” and that getting back to duty would be good for him.  When war was declared he commanded the ammunition column for 12 Howitzer Bde RFA, part of 6th Division.  His servant, Gnr T Woolley (56143), carefully packed up and catalogued all of his belongings which he did not wish to take with him on active service before the unit went to Ireland.  Capt Meyricke landed in France with his unit as part of the British Expeditionary Force on 9 Sep 1914 and was promoted to Major on 30 Oct 1914.  At some point he returned to the UK and was assigned to 58 Bde to be the commander of B/58.  On 2 Feb 1915 he intervened to try to help one of his men, Gnr WSS Lewis (11163), obtain a separation allowance for his wife.  He sailed on SS “Knight Templar” from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  A box of safety cartridges was sent after him on SS “Ionic” which sailed from Devonport a few days after his departure.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing at Suvla Bay on 9 Aug 1915.  On 12 Nov 1915 he was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance with jaundice and was evacuated to Malta on HMHS “Kildonan Castle”, arriving in Malta on 18 Nov 1915.  He was admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Bighi (now Villa Bighi, Kalkara, home of Heritage Malta) overlooking the Grand Harbour.  As well as the jaundice he had tropical ulcers on one of his legs and his back and an unspecified gradually worsening “nervous disease”.  A week later, the jaundice and ulcers had largely healed but Maj Meyricke was still suffering from considerable weakness and debility.  He had wished to stay on Malta until he was fit for duty but was instead told that he was to be evacuated back to the UK on HMHS “Soudan” on 25 Jan 1916.  Earlier on the day of his planned departure, Maj Meyricke had himself carried on a wheeled chair to the terrace at the front of the hospital over-looking the harbour, sat on a wooden garden seat and after a few minutes produced a Colt automatic pistol he had hidden about himself and committed suicide.  He was 38.  He is buried in Pietà Military Cemetery, TTriq id-Duluri, Malta.   
A/Bdr.
Miller
George
65160
D/58
George Miller was born in about 1894 in Chatham, Kent, the son of William and Eliza Miller.  The family fell into poverty and so between at least 1904 and 1907 George lived principally in the local poorhouse, the Union Cottage Homes operated by the Medway Union.  He was often accompanied by his younger sister Catherine, aged 6.  In 1911 he, Catherine and their older sister Dora were working as servants to a fishmonger in Chatham.  Soon after he turned 18, he enlisted in the Army on 8 May 1911 in Chatham, signing on for 3 years with the Colours and a further 9 years in the Reserve.  He served in 45 Battery RFA.  At the end of his 3 year service, he transferred to the reserve on 7 May 1914 and was described as “thoroughly hard-working” “honest, sober and trustworthy” and that he took a pride in his personal appearance.  After war was declared he was mobilised and was posted to 29 Bde RFA, one of the artillery brigades that were part of 4th Division.  He went to France with his brigade on 22 Aug 1914 but a few weeks later was suffering from deafness so was first admitted to hospital in St Omer on 14 Oct 1914 before being evacuated back to the UK four days later and admitted to 2nd London General Hospital, Wandsworth.  He was posted to 118 Bde RFA and on 11 Mar 1915 returned to France when that brigade was posted there.  He was granted leave to the UK between 23 and 31 Jan 1916, but shortly after getting back to his unit from leave he was suffering from laryngitis so was sent to 3 Canadian Field Ambulance on 9 Feb 1916.  After spells in the North Midland Divisional Casualty Clearing Station and 2nd Army Rest Station, he was discharged to duty on 23 Feb 1916.  When 118 Bde was broken up to provide howitzer batteries for 11 Division, he was posted to D/58 on 15 Jul 1916 and was granted a further 10 days’ leave on 4 Aug 1916.  He was appointed an A/Bdr on 24 Jun 1917.  On 3 Oct 1917 George Miller was killed in action while serving in the Ypres salient.  He is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery.  His personal possessions, which included letters, photos, a religious book, a letter case and a silver watch chain were sent to his sister Dora, now Mrs Dora Harland.  She also applied for his medals.   
Bdr.
Miller
James
51110
B/58
James Miller was from Stamford Hill.  After joining the RFA he was first posted overseas to Egypt where he arrived on 14 Jul 1915.  He was serving with B/58 in the Ypres salient as a Bdr when he was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field on 11 Oct 1917, the award being gazetted on 12 Dec 1917.   Before his service ended, he had been promoted to Sgt.  
Dvr.
Mills
William Henry
745198
B/58
William Henry Mills was born in Oldham, Lancs, the son of James and Hannah Mary Mills.  He was baptised on 1 Apr 1896.  By 1911 his father had died and William was working, aged 15, in an iron works in Oldham turning the rollers in the foundry.  After enlisting into the Army, he was first posted overseas with the RFA to France, arriving on 23 Nov 1915.  He was serving in B/58 towards the end of the war when he was killed in action on 10 Oct 1918 during the 2nd Battle of Cambrai.  He died aged 22 and is buried in Canada Cemetery, Tilloy-Les-Cambrai, France.  
2/Lt.
Monks
Thomas Francis
n/a
D/58
Thomas Francis Monks was born in Dublin on 22 August 1889, the son of Thomas Francis and Margaret Mary Monks (née O’Brien).  He followed his father into the law and was admitted as a solicitor on 9 Nov 1911, joining his father in his practice.  He had had some “slight training as a volunteer” before he applied for his commission.  He was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt on 17 Dec 1914 and had hoped to be posted to an Irish Division, but instead on 31 Dec 1914 he joined 58 Bde, part of 11 (Northern) Division.  He was probably assigned to D/58 since he sailed with that battery from Devonport on SS “Karroo” on 5 Jul 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  Within a fortnight he was suffering from a sore throat so was admitted to hospital on 22 Aug 1915 but was discharged the following day.  After the evacuation from Gallipoli, he was promoted to Lt on 1 Jan 1916.  On 16 Mar 1916 he was posted from D/58 to 58 Bde Headquarters and in late June 1916 he sailed with the brigade from Alexandria to Marseilles.   In late July 1916 in France he was acting as the brigade’s Orderly Officer and was described as very nice if a bit young for the role.  Later that year he was granted 12 days leave to the UK on 24 Oct 1916, returning from leave on 10 Nov 1916.  He appears to have served as the brigade’s Orderly Officer until 21 Jan 1917 when he went on an advanced signallers’ course at IV Corps at Crécy.  He was granted 10 days’ leave on 7 May 1917.  On the first day of the Battle of Messines, 7 Jun 1917, he acted as the brigade’s liaison officer with the Royal Irish Regiment when they made their attack and he “did extremely well”.  It may well have been for this that he was awarded the Military Cross which was gazetted on 17 Sep 1917 “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in advancing with the infantry and maintaining accurate and continuous communication with his brigade headquarters in the face of heavy hostile fire. He has on three previous occasions distinguished himself by gallant conduct of a similar nature.”  Having seemingly stood in for the Adjutant on occasions in the Spring of 1917, he was appointed the brigade’s Adjutant and made A/Capt on 18 Jul 17 (though his new rank was only officially recorded from 3 Aug 1917).   He was granted 4 days’ leave to Paris on 1 Nov 1917 and then granted 14 days’ leave to the UK on 22 Dec 1917, returning on 7 Jan 1918.  On his return he was attached to 11 Divisional Artillery for a month, returning to the brigade on 30 Mar 1918.  In late June he had a “3 day fever” and went on a 3 day course at the Royal Artillery 3rd Section Echelon Brigade at Rouen on 18 Jul 1918, returning on 25 Jul 1918.  He went to 1 Corps Officers’ Rest Camp on 31 Aug 1918, returning on 8 Sep 1918.  He left 58 Bde the day before the Armistice, 10 Nov 18 and handed over the post of Adjutant to Lt Cartmel-Robinson.  The following day he took up the post of Staff Capt Royal Artillery to 8 Divisional Artillery and was appointed T/Capt.  He returned to the UK on 17 Dec 1918 on leave which was extended until he went for demobilisation.  He formally ceased to be Staff Capt on 16 Jan 1919 and was demobilised on 4 Mar 1919 at the Officers’ Dispersal Unit, London, being granted the rank of Captain.  After the war he went to Singapore and was admitted to the Bar on 6 Sep 1920 to act as a barrister in the firm of J.G. Campbell.  During his war service, he appears to have been nick-named ‘Gaddy’ Monks by his brother officers and he was portrayed, unsympathetically, in Richard Blaker’s “Medal Without Bar” as ‘Taffy’ Dolbey, the brigade Orderly Officer.  
A/Bdr.
Monks 
William
67578
A/58
William Monks enlisted into the Army in Warrington, Lancs.  He was first posted overseas in the middle of 1915, arriving in Egypt on about 6 Jul 1915.  He was serving in A/58 in the Ypres salient as an A/Bdr on 25Aug 1917, when he and six comrades – Gnr Alec Armitage (152294), Gnr John Barber (91942), Gnr Howard Denley (74517), Dvr Frederick Leathard (109178), Gnr Arthur Noble (L/5762) and Gnr Herbert Taylor (141267) – were killed.  He is buried alongside them in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium, leaving a widow, Esther.
Dvr.
Mooney
Stanley
L/13701
C/58
Stanley Mooney was born on 28 Mar 1895 in Manchester, the son of Albert and Jane Mooney.  By 1901 the family had moved to Preston, Lancs, and in 1911 he was working as a messenger.  On 22 Apr 1915 he had been working as a clerk when he enlisted in Preston, aged 20.  He joined the RFA at Lytham St Annes on 26 Apr 1915 and was posted to B/151 (County Palatine) Howitzer Bde the same day.  He was posted to 8th Reserve Battery on 14 Dec 1915 and to 4A Reserve Bde on 18 Jan 1916 and then, after spending 13 days in Brooke War Hospital, Shooters Hill, Woolwich with rubella, between 13 and 31 Mar 1916, he was posted on discharge to 2A Reserve Bde.  He was posted to France as a “First class signaller” on 27 Sep 1917, having obtained a certificate as a signalling instructor at Fulwood Barracks, Chester earlier that year.  Shortly after arriving in France he was posted to C/58 on 9 Oct 1917.  A few months later, he was admitted to 1 Casualty Clearing Station on 6 Apr 1918 with a fever (pyrexia of unknown origin).   On release from hospital he was posted to Base on 26 May 1918 and posted to A/187 on 17 Jun 1918.  His rank was re-styled as L/Bdr Signaller in August 1918.  Owing possibly to an administrative error, 58 Bde appeared to regard him as still on their strength when they recorded that he had been posted back to the UK on 13 Aug 1918 for a 6 month tour at home.  He was in fact granted 14 days’ leave via Calais between 21 Sep and 5 Oct 1918 by 187 Bde and remained in the UK until he was posted to the Dispersal Centre at Heaton Park from which he was demobilised on 24 Feb 1919.  In 1924 he joined the Territorial Army and he died in 1970 in Preston.  
Bdr.
Morehen
Percy
75346
D/58
Percy Morehen was born in Clifton Reynes, Bucks in about 1896, the son of Walter and Elizabeth Morehen. The family was living in Northamptonshire shortly afterwards and so Percy was baptised in Milton Malsor, Northants on 2 Feb 1896.  In 1911 he was living in Northampton and was working as a shoe operative.   On 23 Aug 1923 he was 22 years old and serving as a Bdr in D/58 helping get a wagon out of a ditch.  While he and others were busy doing that an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on them, killing Percy and eight others, with a ninth man later dying of wounds.  He is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension, France alongside 7 of his former comrades.
A/Bdr.
Morgan
John David
11253
B/58
John David Morgan was born in Portland, Dorset on 16 Jul 1894, the son of John David Morgan.  He enlisted into the Royal Navy joining the training ship HMS Impregnable in Devonport on 4 July 1910 as a “boy 2nd class” being promoted to “boy 1st class” on 23 Jan 1911.  He then served briefly on HMS Leviathan, HMS Victory and HMS Caesar, before being discharged since his service was no longer required on 31 Jan 1912.  He then worked as a sheet-metal worker until he enlisted into the RFA in Portsmouth on 3 Sep 1914, aged 20, claiming never to have served in HM Forces before.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 185 Bty on 10 Sep 1914, which became B/58.  He was appointed A/Bdr on 14 Apr 1915 and, after service in Egypt and Gallipoli, was promoted to Bdr on 28 Jun 1916.  He was reprimanded for neglecting his duty on 9 May 1917 but a few weeks later was wounded by gas on 3 Jun 1917 which resulted in him being evacuated back to the UK on 10 Jun 1917 where he was treated at the Cornelia Hospital, Poole.  He was posted to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon then to 4 Reserve Bde before ending up being posted to B/320 on 19 Nov 1917.  It may have been while serving in B/320 that he suffered gunshot or shrapnel wounds to his neck.   On 28 May 1918 he was again posted to a reserve brigade and remained in the UK until he went to Fovant Dispersal Centre from where he was demobilised on 28 May 1919, being described as of very good character.  He returned to live in Portsea, Portsmouth after the war and died there in 1972, aged 77.
Cpl.
Morgan
   
A/58
Cpl Morgan served in A/58 while the brigade was training in Leeds.  In early April 1915 he was cited as a witness to two other members of A/58 missing roll call: Gnr Evans (10995) on the 3rd and Dvr Birch (11284) the following day.  
Lt.
Morley
George Stuart
n/a
D/58
George Stuart Morley (known as Stuart) was born on 9 Dec 1880. He was commissioned into The Queen’s Regiment (Royal West Surrey) from Sandhurst on 11 Aug 1900 but resigned his commission on 19 Nov 1902.  On 1 Jan 1915 he was appointed a temporary Lt in the RFA.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 29 Aug 1916 and from there to D/58 on 29 Sep 1916.  At some point he transferred to A/58 since he was serving with them on the Somme when he was admitted to hospital sick on 5 Oct 1916.  It is likely that he did not return to 58 Bde.  The following year he was appointed Acting Capt on 23 Nov 1917.  He died in 1973 in Bromley, London, aged 92.
2/Lt.
Morris
E
n/a
C/58
2/Lt E Morris was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 21 Aug 1916 and was posted from there to 58 Bde on 27 Sep 1916, possibly to replace the injured 2/Lt Hunter.  He was sent on a course at the Trench Mortar School, Valhereux, on 5 Dec 1916 and when he returned on 22 Dec 1916 he was posted to 11 DAC but was attached to C/58 for duty.  He left the brigade to join a Trench Mortar unit on 27 Jan 1917.
2/Lt.
Morris
Harry Oswald
n/a
A/58
Harry Oswald Morris was born on 24 Jan 1898 in Bonsall, Derbyshire, the son of Humphrey and Elizabeth Oswald.  He was commissioned into the RFA as a 2/Lt from an Officer Cadet Unit on 19 Aug 1917 and arrived in France in November that year.  He served in 49 Divisional Artillery and was posted from there to join 58 Bde on 11 Apr 1918 where he was attached to A/58.  On 1 Aug 1918 he and three other ranks went on a 10 day veterinary course at Neufchâtel, returning on 11 Aug 1918.  He had some leave in November 1918 and didn’t return to his battery until the day after the Armistice, 12 Nov 1918.  He left to attend a 4 day balloon course with RAF on 13 Jan 1919, rejoining on 19 Jan 1919.  On 22 Jan 1919 the brigade starting demobilising its animals and 2/Lt Morris was selected to take command of the demobilisation of the first 100 animals and take them to Camp Benain and then to serve between Douai and the Base.  He returned to the brigade on 17 Feb 1919 from Codners Camp though was sent again next day back to Codners Camp for more animal demobilisation.  He was promoted to Lt on 19 Feb 1919 and went to the UK for 14 days’ leave on 22 Feb 1919, returning on 12 Mar 1919.  He went again to Codners Camp on 15 Mar 1919.  He married Kathleen and they had at least one son.  In 1939, Harry Morris was living in Matlock, Derbyshire, working as a joiner, the same trade as his father had worked in.  He died in Derbyshire in 1979, aged 81.  
Gnr.
Morris
   
D/58
Gunner Morris left D/58 to return to the UK for a 6 month tour at home on 13 Aug 1918.
Gnr.
Morrish
William Edward
183648
B/58
William Edward Morrish was born in 1898 in Teignmouth, Devon, the son of Frederick William and Ellen Morrish.  He enlisted in Newton Abbott.  He was serving in B/58 when he died in 4 General Hospital, Lincoln, on 19 Oct 1917, aged 19.  He is buried in Teignmouth Cemetery.  
2/Lt.
Moses
Vivian Sylvester
n/a
A/58
Vivian Sylvester Moses was born in 1897 in London, the only son of Samuel and Beatrice Moses.  In 1910 he gained the Senior Entrance Scholarship at University College School and the following year he obtained an Entrance Scholarship at St Paul’s School.  He obtained an open Classical Scholarship at Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1916, but that same year he applied for a temporary commission on 8 Jul 1916 and was commissioned into the RFA on 2 Dec 1916.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 11 Feb 1917 from the Base and was then posted to A/58 on 24 Feb 1917.  A week later he was posted to C/59 on 3 Mar 1917 and then to B/59 on 15 Mar 1917.  He was posted back to 11 DAC on 23 Apr 1917 and was attached to Y Trench Mortar Battery, 11 Division Artillery, on 1 Jun 1917 but was killed 3 days later on 4 Jun 1917 by shell fire when observing his trench mortar fire.  He was 19 years old.  He is buried in La Laiterie Military Cemetery, Belgium.  He was described by one of his former schoolmasters as “one of the most lovable of boys, greatly gifted, yet wholly modest, of exceptionally virile intellect, yet the personification of simplicity.”  His parents donated £150 to his local synagogue in his memory to provide a fund for Jewish widows of former RFA men who lived in London.  
A/Sgt.
Mount
   
B/58
A/Sgt Mount was replaced as Sgt in D/58 by Daniel McLeod (93603) on 17 Feb 1917 and “reverted”, presumably to Cpl.  
Gnr.
Munden
Bertie
10280
B/58
Bertie Munden was born in Poole, Dorset, and enlisted into the Army in that town probably shortly after the declaration of war.  He was serving in B/58 when he was killed in action on 12 Jul 1917 and is commemorated on the Menin Gate memorial at Ypres, Belgium.   
2/Lt.
Murgatroyd
Norman Arthur
n/a
B/58
Norman Arthur Murgatroyd was probably born on 23 Feb 1897 in Huddersfield, Yorks, the son of William and Harriet Murgatroyd.  He was commissioned as a 2/Lt (on probation) into the West Riding Bde RFA on 28 Oct 1916 having previously been a cadet in this Territorial Force unit.   He had been serving in 17 Division Artillery when he joined 11 Division Ammunition Column on 8 Oct 1917 but was then quickly posted to join B/58 four days later.   He was a candidate for the Commander Royal Artillery’s “examination of 2/Lets for promotion (1st sitting)” on 16 Dec 1917.  He had 14 days’ leave, returning to his battery on 10 Jan 1918.  He was one of several officers and men who suffered from gas attacks in April 1918, and he had to retire to the wagon lines on 10 Apr 1918 following the gas attacks of the previous 2 days.  He was promoted Lt on 28 Apr 1918.  On 20 Aug 1918 he was sent on a 3 week course for Forward Observation Officers and Signallers at the 11 Division Artillery school.  He went on 14 days’ leave on 3 Oct 1918.  After the Armistice, he reported to the hospital sick on 27 Feb 1919.  By 1939 he was married to Annie and he was working as a cloth bleacher and finisher.  
Bdr.
Murkin
James Abraham
21079
C/58
James Abraham Murkin was born in the village of Dullingham Ley, near Newmarket, Cambs, on 6 Apr 1891.  He was one of the 10 children of John and Emily Murkin.  He enlisted into the RFA on 3 Sep 1914 and was posted as a driver, probably to D/60 Bde RFA.  After training in Norwich and at Witley Camp, he was posted to Egypt, arriving on about 19 Jul 1915, and probably served at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli.  At some point he was promoted to Bdr and during his time in the Army he embroidered a number of pictures which he sent home to his family.  He travelled to France in July 1916 and was probably serving in C/58 when he was wounded on about 1 Jun 1917, possibly from a shell fired by a nearby battery which exploded prematurely.  He was admitted to No.4 General Hospital, Camiers, and had two operations, one in France on 9 June and the second back in the UK on 10 Aug 1917.  He recuperated in the St John and St Elizabeth Hospital in London and was discharged from the Army on 28 Jan 1918 due to the wounds he had received, so was awarded a Silver War Badge, number 306754.  He married Gladys Violet Barlow in 1922 and they set up home in the village of Brimington, near Chesterfield, Derbyshire.  In 1939, James was working as a blacksmith’s sticker, and in 1952 he died, aged 61, in the same cottage as he and Gladys had been living in since their marriage.
Sgt.
Murrell
Joseph
42172
 
Joseph Murrell was a pre-war regular soldier who was probably born in about 1888 in Millwall and was serving with 148 Battery at Woolwich in 1911.  He went to France as part of the BEF, arriving there on 16 Aug 1914 as a member of 43 Bde RFA.  At some point he was promoted to Sgt and it was in that rank that he joined 58 Bde on 17 Sep 1916 in France.  
Dvr.
Myerscough
Thomas Jackson
136236
B/58
Thomas Jackson Myerscough was born on 5 Sep 1883 and baptised the following month in Poulton le Fylde, Lancs, the son of William and Janet Myerscough.  He was serving as a driver in B/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field – the award was gazetted on 4 Jul 1919.  He was discharged from the Army on 31 May 1920.  On 21 Apr 1925, he married Elizabeth Horn in the parish church of St Michael’s on Wyre, Garstang, Lancs and they had at least one son, John.  In 1939 the family were still living in St Michael’s on Wyre and Thomas was working as a dairy farmer.  He died in 1944, aged 61 and was buried on 13 Dec 1944 in his local churchyard.  
Gnr.
Neal
George James
11175
 
George James Neal enlisted into the RFA on 2 Sep 1914.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 13 Jun 1918 as being no longer fit for military service due to wounds he had received.  
Capt.
Nelson  
David
 
A/58
David Nelson was born in 1886 in Stradnooden, County Monaghan, the son of George and Annie Nelson.    He joined the RFA in 1904 but transferred to “L” Battery RHA with service number 34419.   He was promoted to Bdr in 1910 and obtained a first class certificate in gunnery from the School of Gunnery at Shoeburyness, Essex.  The day after war was declared, he was promoted to Sgt on 5 Aug 1914 and ten days later, on the 15th, he arrived in France with the BEF.  On 1 Sep 1914, David Nelson was one of the surviving members of “L” Battery RHA who fought the famed action at Néry where, despite being badly wounded, he remained firing the last working gun of the battery against overwhelming odds.  For this, he was awarded the Victoria Cross, the citation reading “Helping to bring the guns into action under heavy fire at Nery on 1st September, and while severely wounded remaining with them until all the ammunition was expended—although he had been ordered to retire to cover.”  On 15 Nov 1915 he married Ada Jane Jessie Bishop in Erith, Kent, and was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt the same day.  He was appointed a Captain-Instructor in Gunnery at the School of Gunnery on 1 Mar 1915 and was promoted to Lt on 9 Jun 1915.  He was “restored to the establishment” on 11 Dec 1917, by which time he was an acting Captain and he joined 58 Bde and was attached to A/58 for instruction on 29 Dec 1917 “for instruction”, probably in how to command a battery, because on 1 Mar 1918 he was posted to be Battery OIC of D/59 and so appointed as acting Major.  Just a few weeks later, David Nelson was severely wounded near Lillers, France on 7 Apr 1918, receiving wounds to his back, left forearm, right foot and skull,  He died the following day of his wounds at 58 (West Riding) Casualty Clearing Station, aged 31, and is buried Lillers Communal Cemetery, France. 
Dvr.
Nichol
Frank
10675
C/58
Frank Nichol was probably born on 13 Jul 1897.  He was born in Birmingham, the son of William and Theresa Nichol, and was the youngest of 4 children, with older brothers William and Horace and sister Elsie.   He worked as an art metal worker in Bordesley, near Birmingham, and he enlisted in Birmingham on 31 Aug 1914, claiming to be aged 19 though was probably only 17.  He was posted to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 14, which became C/58 and sailed with them to Alexandria in July 1915.  On 2 Oct 1915 he was “irregular” on parade according to Sgt Maj Buchan and so was awarded 7 days’ confinement to camp by 2/Lt N Hunt, OC Details.  This may have occurred on the island of Lemnos.  He was posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 10 Jan 1916 having been evacuated back to the UK and admitted to The Lord Derby Hospital in Warrington, Lancs with paratyphoid.  After a month there he was discharged and permitted 6 weeks’ furlough, between 1 Apr and 13 May 1916.  He was then posted to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon on 19 May 1916, then to 21 (R) Battery on 16 Sep 1916 before being posted back overseas to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force as a driver on 11 Nov 1916.  He joined 84 Small Arms Ammunition Column at Salonika.  After the Armistice he was posted to join the Expeditionary Force in southern Russia at Batum, arriving there on 29 Jan 1919 but leaving again on 8 Feb 1919 to return to Salonika on his way back to the UK.  He was sent for demobilisation at the Dispersal Centre Chisledon, leaving Salonika on 2 Mar 1919 and arriving back in the UK on 14 Mar 1919.  He probably married Florence May Vernon and they had a son Maurice Vernon Nichol.  He probably died in 1979, aged 82.  
A/Bdr.
Nicholls
Thomas Sidney
10621
B/58
Thomas Sidney Nicholls was born on 15 Nov 1890 in Upper Quinton, Glos [now Warks], the son of Sidney Richard and Mary Nicholls.  In 1901 the family were living in Birmingham and in 1911 Mary, now a widow and Thomas were living in Rugby where Thomas worked as a machinist for an electrical manufacturer.  When war broke out Thomas was working as a mechanic and enlisted in Rugby on 31 Aug 1914, aged 23, and joined the RFA.  He was posted initially to No.3 depot at Hilsea and from there to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914.  He was appointed an A/Bdr on 3 May 1915.  Probably during his pre-embarkation leave, he married Lillian Maud Heath in New Bilton, Rugby, Warks on 5 Jun 1915 and they appear to have gone to live with Thomas’s mother, Mary.  Their son, Frederick Sidney Richard Nicholls was born on 17 Feb 1916.   Thomas sailed from Devonport with the brigade on 1 July 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  He was appointed a temporary paid A/Bdr on 17 Sep 1915 and then a T/Bdr on 12 Dec 1915.  He was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 11 Nov 1916.  On 5 Feb 1917, he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance with diarrhoea, returning to duty on 10 Feb 1917.  On 29 Mar 1917 he was admitted to 3 Canadian Stationary Hospital and was discharged back to duty on 9 Apr 1917.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK on 19 Oct 1917.  He was appointed paid A/Cpl on 6 Jan 1918 and promoted to Cpl on 19 Feb 1918.  He was redesignated as a Signaller Cpl in November 1918.  After the Armistice, he was posted to Chisledon Dispersal Centre on 20 Jan 1919, sailing from Dieppe on 24 Jan 1919 and was demobilised on 23 Feb 1919.  On 1 Nov 1921, he and Lillian had a second son, James D L Nicholls, and in 1939 the family were still living in Rugby where Thomas was working as a motor and general mechanic.  He died in Rugby in 1975, aged 84.
Gnr.
Nicholls
William
685950
 
William Nicholls enlisted into a West Lancashire Territorial Force artillery brigade on 19 May 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde on 26 Feb 1918 when he was discharged from the Army due to sickness.
Dvr.
Nicholls
William Henry 
10730
58 Bde AC
William Henry Nicholls was born in about 1895 in East Ogwell, near Newton Abbott, Devon, the son of George and Florence Nicholls.  He enlisted in Exeter on 1 Sep 1914, aged 19, having been working as a forester.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Sep 1914.  He joined D/58 on its creation on 21 Jan 1915 and embarked with his battery at Devonport on 3 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  He sailed with the brigade from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  He was admitted to hospital on Gallipoli on 19 Sep 1915 and was evacuated to Malta.  He was evacuated back to the UK from Malta on the Hospital Ship “Italia” on 29 Oct 1915.  On arrival back in the UK he was admitted on 10 Nov 1915 to 8th London General Hospital, Wandsworth with pleurisy.  He was discharged on 24 Jan 1916 and was posted to Mesopotamia, sailing again from Devonport on 7 May 1916 and disembarking at Basrah on 11 Jun 1916, where he joined 8th Battery, 13 Bde RFA on 5 Jul 1916.  The following year he was admitted to 20 Canadian Field Ambulance on 7 Feb 1917 with malaria, being discharged to duty on 20 Feb 1917.  He must have left the region for some reason over the next year or so because he re-embarked for Mesopotamia on 7 May 1918 and was granted leave to India from 28 May 1918.  However, he didn’t return to Mesopotamia after his leave so was struck off the strength of the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force (MEF).  He embarked at Bombay on 17 Nov 1918 and so was taken back on the strength of the MEF, disembarking at Basrah on 24 Nov 1918.  He was posted back to 8th Battery two days later.  After the Armistice, he embarked at Basrah on HT “Cocanada” on 31 Jan 1919. to go back to the UK for demobilisation, arriving on 30 Apr 1919, when he went to No.1 Dispersal Unit, Fovant.  He was demobilised on 7 Jun 1919 and was discharged from the Army on 31 Mar 1920.  
Cpl.
Ninham
Alfred
27059
 
Cpl Ninham was serving in 58 Bde when he was sent on a course at V Army School on 24 Nov 1916.  This was probably Cpl Alfred Ninham.  Alfred Ninham was born on 17 May 1885 and joined the Army on 10 Oct 1902.  He married Minnie Elizabeth Booth in early 1917 and was discharged from the Army on 3 Feb 1919 due to wounds he had received.  He was serving in 250 Bde RFA at the time.  in 1939 he was living in Woolwich with Minnie and working as a builder’s labourer.   They had 4 children.  Alfred died in London in 1966, aged 80.
Gnr.
Noble
Arthur
L/5762
A/58
Arthur Noble was born in Moortown, Leeds, Yorks in 1896, the son of Walter and Mary Jane Noble.  In 1911 he was working as gardener.  He enlisted in Leeds and was first posted to France on 29 Dec 1915 where he served in B/48 Bde of 14th (Light) Division, another of the “K1” divisions.  He was wounded in the leg probably late in 1916 and while he was recovering in January 1917 needed crutches to get around for a while.  He was posted to A/58, probably after his recuperation, and was serving in that battery on 25 Aug 1917 in the Ypres salient, when he and six comrades – Gnr Alec Armitage (152294), Gnr John Barber (91942), Gnr Howard Denley (74517), Dvr Frederick Leathard (109178), A/Bdr William Monks (67578) and Gnr Herbert Taylor (141267) – were killed.  He is buried alongside them in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium.  
Gnr.
Nolan    
William Michael
93183
C/58
William Michael Nolan was born on 16 Mar 1882 in Aldershot, the son of an Army Sgt, Michael, and his wife, Fanny.  He enlisted – probably into the Territorials – on 28 Apr 1908.  He was a postman by trade.  He was awarded the Military Medal in the June 1916 King’s Birthday Honours.  He was wounded on 5 Oct 1917 with multiple gunshot wounds to left leg and foot.  He had a Medical Board on 7 May 1918 when he was described as 100% disabled and was discharged from the Army as being unfit for military service on 28 May 1918, when he was described as steady, sober and reliable.  He was 36 years old.  He then had several more assessments on at least 30 Sep 1918, 24 Oct 1919, 20 Sep 1920 (at which time he was able to walk short distances) and 27 Sep 1921, when his left foot was still described as “inverted”.  He was given a surgical boot to help his mobility.  He married Florence and they had at least 5 children, 1 of whom died in infancy. They lived in Leeds, Yorks, after the war.  In 1939 he and Florence were still living in Leeds: he was still working as a postman, but Florence was an invalid.
Sgt.
Norris  
Lindsay
93068
A/58
Lindsay Norris was born in about 1890 in the USA, the son of John Norris.  He appears to have arrived in Glasgow in November 1893, along with his mother May, and siblings Jennie and John on board the “Devonia”.  He was working as an ironworker in Greenock, Renfrewshire, when he enlisted, aged 24, on 27 Aug 1914 in Greenock.  He joined the RFA and was posted to No.6 depot, Glasgow the same day and from there to 184 Battery as a gunner the following day.  He was appointed a paid A/Bdr on 23 Oct 1914 and promoted to Bdr on 5 Jan 1915.  After 184 Battery became A/58, he was promoted to Cpl on 27 Jan 1915 and to Sgt on 24 Mar 1915.  He went absent without leave for 21 hours on 4 Apr 1915 while training at Chapeltown Barracks, Leeds, for which he was severely reprimanded by Lt Col Drake.  He was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 29 Apr 1915.  The following month, presumably during his pre-embarkation leave, he married Letitia Gillespie on 31 May 1915.  He sailed from Devonport with the brigade on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He was posted back to A/58 on 20 Oct 1915.  While at el Ferdan, Egypt, he was tried by Court Martial on 29 Mar 16 on a charge of conduct to prejudice of good order and military discipline, but he was found not guilty.  Along with the brigade he embarked at Alexandria on 25 Jun 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  He was awarded the Military Medal by OIC A/58 on 16 Nov 1916.  On 12 Jan 1916 he left 58 Bde when he was posted back to the UK to be an instructor and was posted to No.1 Royal Artillery Cadet School, St John’s Wood on 6 Feb 1917 to train the cadets probably in gun-laying.  However, he absented himself without leave between 2 p.m. on 23 Mar and 9.55 p.m. on 28 Mar 1917 so was tried by a District Court Martial conducted at Chelsea Barracks on 5 Apr 1917.  He was found guilty and was sentenced to be reduced to Corporal, but his sentence was subsequently remitted by the General Officer Commanding the London District two days later on account of his previous good service.  He was though removed from his instructor post and was posted to No.3 Reserve Bde (Territorial Force) at Bulford on 10 Apr 1917 and then he was transferred to the RGA on 11 Jun 17, where he was assigned the new service number 173616.  He attended the Siege School at Prees Heath and was assigned to 468 Siege Battery.  He was posted to 112 Siege Battery on 22 Dec 1917 to act as a gun-layer and took part in the defence against the German onslaught of 21 Mar 1918.  He suffered a “mild” gunshot wound to his neck on 25 May 1918 when a shell landed in the battery position wounding him and two others, Gunners Barnet and Seabourne.  He was admitted to 3 General Hospital at Le Tréport on 30 May 1918, re-joining his unit on 23 Jun 1918. On Armistice Day he was awarded 14 days’ leave to the UK, returning to his unit on 25 Nov 1918.  He was demobilised on 18 Mar 1919 at Georgetown Dispersal Centre.   On 7 Jun 1930 he sailed from Glasgow for Canada on the “Minnedosa” and his trade at the time was given as steel erector.  Six months later, his wife Letitia, and their three sons, Alexander, John and Lindsay, sailed on the “Antonia” from Greenock on 16 May 1931 to Canada, presumably to join him.
Gnr.
North
George Timothy
211657
C/58
George Timothy North was born on 20 Jan 1893, the son of George and Winifred North in Aston Rowant, Oxfordshire.  After his father died, he and his mother lived with his grandmother, Susannah Chapman, in Chinnor, Wallingford, Oxon.  In 1911, George was working as a butcher.  He was serving as a gunner in C/58 when he was killed in action on 30 Aug 1917, aged 24.  He is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.
2/Lt.
Norton  
James Eliot
n/a
B/58
James Eliot Norton was born in India on 20 Oct 1894.  He was educated at Wellington College, Berks, and was commissioned into the RFA as a 2/Lt on 30 Nov 1914 after being a cadet in an Officers Training Corps.  He went to the Mediterranean Theatre of war, arriving on 11 Oct 15 and was posted to join 58 Bde.  His arrival with 58 Bde as a replacement was announced on 25 Oct 1915 and he was assigned to B/58.  He was awarded the Military Cross in the New Year’s Honours 1917, with the award being gazetted on 25 Jan 1917.  The citation read: “For conspicuous gallantry in action. He continued to pass the orders to two isolated sections after telephonic communication had been broken down, thereby enabling three guns to be kept in action. On another occasion he kept his battery in action under very heavy fire and set a fine example to his men.”  He was actually on leave when his award was announced, having been granted 10 days’ leave on 23 Dec 1916, returning on 4 Jan 1917.  He apparently went sick, returning to his battery on 1 Mar 1917.  He was granted a further 10 days’ leave on 5 May 1917, not returning though until 8 Jun 1917.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917, but that autumn he suffered from ill-health and so was invalided out of the Army, relinquishing his commission on 8 Dec 1917.  Shortly after the German Spring Offensive on March 1918, he rejoined the Army and was appointed a T/Lt again on 3 Apr 1918, with seniority from 1 Jul 1917.  He even managed to return to his old battery, after having joined 11 Division Ammunition Column from Base on 4 May 18, he was posted back to B/58 the following day.  A week later on 12 May 1918 he was sick again, along with several other officers of the brigade.  He was appointed T/Capt between 4 Jul and 13 Sep 1918.  On 27 Sep 1918 he helped Capt Foster reconnoitre the Canal du Nord.  He was awarded a bar to his Military Cross “For conspicuous gallantry and ability at Meaurhin [Meaurain, Belgium] on 6th November 1918, while performing liaison duties with attacking infantry.  On one occasion he brought back information personally through a heavy barrage.  Later he got a line through to the infantry, which he maintained all night in spite of the severity of the hostile barrage, going out under heavy fire when the signallers were unable to repair it, and mending, all the breaks himself”.  After the Armistice he went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 16 Nov 1918, returning on 5 Dec 1918.  While he was away, he was appointed the Brigade Education Officer on 1 Dec 1918 to help prepare the men for civilian life.  He went on a 10 days’ course with the RAF between 5 and 12 Jan 19 and returned to the UK for demobilisation.  In 1939 he was living in Woking, Surrey, with his wife Mona and working as a chartered accountant.  He died in Aldershot, Hants in 1969, aged 74.  
Gnr.
Oak
   
B/58
Gnr Oak was cited as a witness to Gnr George McGuire (93021) being drunk and of conduct to the prejudice of military discipline at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria, on 20 Jul 1915.  
Dvr.
Oakford
Frederick John
211650
A/58
Frederick John Oakford was probably born in 1887, the son of Harry and Ellen Oakford in Haslemere, Surrey.  His father died, so in 1901 the family were living with Alfred C White, in Shackleford, Surrey.  In 1911, Frederick was working as a baker in Eastbourne.  He had moved back to Surrey to live in Pyrford when he was conscripted, enlisting in Woking, Surrey.  He was probably serving in A/58 when he was killed in action on 5 Aug 1917.  He is buried in La Belle Alliance Cemetery, Belgium.  
Bdr.
Oatey
Wilfred Hedley
10570
C/58
Wilfred Hedley Oatey was born on 29 Mar 1892 in Hambridge, near Langport, Somerset, the son of William Henry and Mary Ann Oatey.  He followed his father into the grocer’s trade and in 1911 was working as a grocer’s assistant, probably working for his father.  He enlisted in Taunton on 3 Sep 1914 alongside another Hambridge man, Harry Priddle (also of C/58 and with service number 10569) and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there he was posted to 186 Battery in Leeds on 10 Sep 1914 which was later re-numbered C/58.  He was appointed an A/Bdr on 2 Nov 1914 and was promoted to that rank on 14 Nov 1914.  He went abroad with his battery to Egypt and then to Gallipoli.  He was probably back in Egypt when he was posted to 17 Bde RFA, part of 29 Division, on 5 Mar 1916.  A few days later he sailed with them to France on 9 Mar 1916 and his unit became No.2 Section 29 Division Ammunition Column.  He voluntarily reverted to the rank of gunner on 4 Sep 1916.  He was posted to 15 Battery on 12 Nov 1916 and then to Base on 1 Feb 1917.  At some point he joined D/94 and was serving in that battery when he was sent to the Dispersal Centre at Fovant for demobilisation, which took place on 11 Apr 1919.  He then claimed a pension due to valvular disease of the heart so was awarded 11 shillings a week.  He returned to Hambridge to be the manager of a grocer’s store but travelled back to Leeds to marry Ethel Gautrey in the Wesleyan Church, Harehills Lane, Leeds on 13 Sep 1919.  They had at least one son, Raymond, and in 1939 Wilfred and family were living in Blackpool, Lancs where Wilfred was working as a van salesman.  He died in Hampshire in 1974, aged 82.  
Lt.
O’Kelly
Patrick Joseph
n/a
D/58
Patrick Joseph O’Kelly, known as “PJ” was born Patrick Joseph Kelly in Caher, Feakle, County Clare, Ireland. He was born on 29 Jul 1889, the son of Patrick and Margaret Kelly, and was educated at Skerry’s College, Dublin.  He was living in Athlone, Ireland when he applied for a commission on 21 Sep 1914.  He married Mary O’Connell (sometimes called Mabel) on 30 Dec 1914 in St Peter’s church, Athlone and they had a son, Gerard Charles O’Kelly, born on 7 Dec 1915. He was promoted to Lt on 20 May 1916 and for some reason he did not go to France until 1916.  He was serving in D/58 when, on 26 Sep 1916 the Battle of Thiepval began.  He was acting as a Forward Observing Officer when he was killed in action.  He was buried initially about 150 yards south west of La Boisselle Communal Cemetery with documents identifying him buried alongside him in a bottle.  Mary received a gratuity of £140 and a pension of £100 a year, and Gerard was granted a gratuity of £43 13s 4d and a pension of £24 a year.  In 1920 his remains were reinterred in Ovillers Military Cemetery, France.  Mary must have re-married because in 1936 she applied again for a widow’s pension, having recently been re-widowed.  P J O’Kelly’s life is commemorated at http://foodbornandbred.com/2013/11/for-remembrance-day-a-tribute-to-my-grand-uncle/. 
Dvr.
O’Neill
James
964
D/58
James O’Neill was born in Albrest, County Tyrone, Ireland, the son of Margaret O’Neill.  He enlisted into the RFA in Paisley, Renfrewshire, and was serving in D/58 when he died on 13 Aug 1917 of wounds.  He is buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Cpl.
Orpin   
Edward Henry
78309
D/58
Edward Henry Orpin was from Hastings, Sussex.  He went to France on about 13 Mar 1915 and was serving in D/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal which was gazetted on 22 Jul 1919.  
Gnr.
Padfield
James Marmion
285818
B/58
James Marmion Padfield was born on 29 Oct 1885, the son of George and Elizabeth Padfield.  He came from Bedminster, Bristol and in 1901, aged 15, he was working as an upholsterer’s apprentice.  In about 1910 he married Florence, who was also from Bedminster, and the following year James was working as a furniture packer for the Co-operative Wholesale Society.   He attested under the Derby scheme on 30 Nov 1915 and joined the Territorial Force artillery unit, 3/1 South Midland Bde RFA, in May 1916 where he was assigned service number 826461.  In January 1917 he was officially assigned a new service number (285818) to denote that he had originally enlisted into the regular Army, though he may have never been aware of the fact.  He was serving in B/58 (though some records suggest it was D/58) when he was admitted to 11 Casualty Clearing Station on 26 Apr 1917 suffering from mastoiditis and was transferred the next day to 3 Canadian Stationary Hospital.  He was discharged from the Army due to sickness on 7 Mar 1919.  In 1939 he was a widower and was living alone in Thanet Rd, Bedminster and was working as a store keeper in an upholstery factory.  He died in Bristol in 1948, aged 62.
Bdr.
Paine
Harold Godfrey
14729
D/58
Harold Godfrey Paine was born in 1897 in Hailsham, Sussex, the son of Godfrey Edward and Edith Annie Paine, née Bates.  Harold was educated at Lindfield School.  In 1911 the family were living in Lindfield, Sussex and Harold was working as a baker’s errand boy, aged 15.  He enlisted into the RFA in Haywards Heath.  He was serving in D/58 in the final stages of The Somme Offensive during The Battle of The Ancre, when he and Sgt Arthur Wright (82835) were killed by a shell on 2 or 3 Nov 1916.  He was 19 years old and is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery, alongside Sgt Wright. 
Dvr.
Palliser
Leonard John
110888
C/58
Leonard John Palliser was born on 11 May 1894 in Knayton, near Thirsk, Yorks.  He was the elder son of Thomas and Mary Palliser (née Clark) and his younger brother, Fred, was also a 58 Bde soldier.  By 1901, the family had moved to Otley, Yorks and in 1911 Leonard was an apprentice compositor in a printing works.  He and Fred enlisted into the RFA on 15 Oct 1915 in Keighley, Yorks; Leonard was aged 21 at the time and had been working as a linotype operator.  The brothers were posted to No.4 Depot at Woolwich the following day, and from there to 12th Reserve Battery, 2B Reserve Bde in Preston Barracks, Brighton on 27 Oct 1915.  On 6 Nov 1915 he was posted to 11th Reserve Battery which was also in Preston Barracks, before being posted back to Woolwich to join 20th Reserve Battery, 4A Reserve Bde on 22 Feb 1916.  Leonard and Fred were posted overseas to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force Base Depot, so embarked at Devonport on 15 Mar 1916, arriving in Alexandria on 26 Mar 1916.  They were both then posted to join C/58 at El Ferdan on 10 Apr 1916.  A fortnight later Leonard was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance on 26 Apr 1916 with infected periosteum.  He rejoined his unit two days later, but was re-admitted to 35 Field Ambulance on 14 Jun 1916 with an abscess.  On 23 Jun 1916 he was transferred to 31 General Hospital in Cairo and was discharged back to duty on 10 Aug 1916.  While he was in hospital, his brother Fred sailed with 58 Bde from Alexandria on 26 Jun 1916, so the two brothers parted.  Leonard was posted to the General Base Depot at Sidi Bishr on 6 Sep 1916 but was then re-admitted to hospital on 26 Sep 1916 when he went to 17 General Hospital, Alexandria.  He was discharged back to the depot on 31 Oct 1916.  The following year, he was attached to 91 Heavy Battery, RGA on 19 Apr 1917.  He was admitted to hospital on 21 Jun 1917 with an ulcer on his left leg, returning back to Base Depot on 25 Aug 1917.  He then rejoined 91 Heavy Battery RGA on 1 Sep 1917.  He was found in a brothel in Palestine on 9 Apr 1918 so was sentenced to 4 days’ Field Punishment No.2.  On 30 Nov 1918 he was admitted to hospital, rejoining his unit on 28 Dec 1918.  On 26 Jan 1919, his father, Thomas, wrote to the War Office asking if Leonard might be permitted to return to the UK because his wife, Leonard’s mother, was dangerously ill and was “constantly asking for him”.  That request appeared to be granted because on 8 Mar 1919, Leonard embarked on the SS “Malwa” in Egypt, arriving back in the UK on 21 Mar 1919.  On his discharge from the Army Leonard was described as reliable, intelligent and of good sobriety.  After the war he returned to live in Otley, Yorks, and on 4 Jul 1921 he married Elsie Williamson in the Parish Church, Guiseley, Yorks.  They had at least 2 daughters.  In 1939, he and Elsie were living in Stockport, Cheshire, and Leonard was again working as a linotype operator.  He died in 1959, aged 65.
Dvr.
Palliser   
Frederick
110887
C/58
Frederick Palliser (known throughout his life as Fred) was born on 21 Jul 1895 in Knayton, near Thirsk, Yorks, the son of Thomas and Mary Palliser (née Clark).  By 1901, the family had moved to Otley, Yorks, where Thomas worked as an iron moulder.  In 1911 Fred was working as an assistant boot salesman in Otley.  On 15 Oct 1915, he and his elder brother Leonard enlisted into the RFA in Keighley, Yorks.  Fred was 20 years old and had been working as a shop assistant.  The brothers were posted to No.4 Depot at Woolwich the following day, and from there to 12th Reserve Battery, 2B Reserve Bde in Preston Barracks, Brighton on 27 Oct 1915.  On 6 Nov 1915 he was posted to 11th Reserve Battery which was also in Preston Barracks, before being posted back to Woolwich to join 20th Reserve Battery, 4A Reserve Bde on 22 Feb 1916.  Fred and Leonard were posted overseas to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force Base Depot, so embarked at Devonport on 15 Mar 1916, arriving in Alexandria on 26 Mar 1916.  They were both then posted to join C/58 at El Ferdan on 10 Apr 1916.  The two brothers parted when Fred sailed with 58 Bde from Alexandria on 26 Jun 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 2 Jul 1916, while Leonard was in hospital with an abscess.  The following year, still while serving in C/58, Fred was awarded the Military Medal, which was gazetted on 14 Sep 1917.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance with bronchitis on 23 Oct 1917 and was evacuated back to the UK on 8 Nov 1917 where he was hospitalised with scalded feet and stayed in the Kitchener Hospital Brighton until 31 Dec 17.  While recuperating, Fred was presented with his Military Medal by the Chairman of Otley Urban District Council on 25 Feb 1918.  The following month he was serving with 49 Reserve Bde at Charlton Park when he was a day late returning from embarkation leave on 19 Mar 1918 so was fined 2 days’ pay.  He returned to France on 26 Mar 1918 and after passing through 4 Division Ammunition Column, he joined 29 Bde RFA on 1 Apr 1918.  He was appointed L/Bdr on 13 May 1918, and A/Cpl the following month on 25 Jun 1918.  On 17 Jul 1918 he relinquished his appointment as A/Cpl when he set off to return to the UK to attend an Officer Cadet Unit.  On 14 Jan 1919 he was posted from No.3 RFA Cadet School to 5C Reserve Bde Charlton Park, returning to the ranks at his own request.   On 9 Feb 1919 he was sent for demobilisation and attended No.1 Dispersal Unit Ripon on 13 Feb 1919.  In the spring of 1920, Fred married Florence (Florrie) Hartley and by the November of that year he was working as a manager in Durham.  In 1939 he was living with Florrie in Walsall, Staffs, where he worked as the manager of a shoe store.  He died on 21 Mar 1981 in Wharfedale, West Yorks, aged 85.
A/Sgt.
Parker
George Edward
4765
B/58
George Edward Parker was posted overseas to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, arriving in Egypt on about 13 Oct 1915.  He was serving in B/58 when he was appointed A/Sgt on 6 Jan 1918, his place as Cpl being taken by Bdr T S Nicholls (10621). 
Dvr.
Parkin
Bernard  Edmund
92782
A/58
Bernard Edmund Parkin was born in 1899 in Sheffield, the son of George and Rose Ellen Parkin.  In 1901 the family was living in Norton, Derbyshire but in 1911 Rose and her children were living in Blackpool.  Bernard enlisted underage into the RFA and was serving in A/58 when he was part of a party taking up pack animals on 11 July 1917 when they got badly shelled.  He was killed and two others were wounded as were several horses.  He died aged 18 and is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Capt.
Parkin 
Carol Lewis
n/a
B/58
Carol Lewis Parkin was born on 15 Nov 1893 in London, the son of Montagu Lewis and Alice Winifred Parkin (née Owen).  He attended Radley College.  After war was declared, he was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 26 Aug 1914, having previously been in the Officer Training Corps.  He was promoted to Lt on 12 Sep 1915 and was appointed an adjutant on 1 Apr 1916.   On 1 Jan 1917 he was awarded the Military Cross in the New Year’s Honours and on 21 Mar 1917 he was appointed an A/Capt while Second-in-Command of a battery.  He was posted to join B/58 on 20 Jul 1918 though was at the time still at 1 Corps School where he was to stay for a little longer.  After the war, he sailed on 30 Oct 1919 for Batavia in the Federated Malay States to be a commercial manager, but within a few years he was living in South Africa where he married Angela Vivian Quin on 19 Dec 1925 in Bloemfontein, South Africa.  During World War 2 he served in the South African Forces as a Lt Col.  On 8 May 1941 he took over command of 2nd South African Anti-Tank Regt and fought with them in the Western Desert and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his services at Tobruk in 1942 (award gazetted 19 Dec 1946) and was Mentioned in Dispatches which was gazetted on 15 Dec 1942.  He died in Durban, South Africa on 22 Apr 1995.
Bdr.
Parrott
Harry
11176
A/58
Harry Parrott enlisted into the RFA shortly after the outbreak of the war.  He went overseas, possibly with 58 Bde, in July 1915 to Egypt.  He was serving in A/58 when he died on 17 Aug 1917 and he is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium, leaving a widow, Nellie.  This may have been Harry Parrott, a farm labourer and the son of George and Ellen Parrott who was born in about 1890 in Pyrton, near Thame, Oxon, and who was baptised on 6 Apr 1891 in Stoke Talmage, Oxon. 
Gnr.
Parsons
Walter Henry
10575
C/58
Walter Henry Parsons was born on 9 Oct 1896 in Wellington, Somerset, the son of Walter and Matilda Parsons.  He worked as an errand boy and later as a shop assistant.  On 1 Sep 1914 he enlisted underage into the RFA in Yeovil, claiming to be 20 years old.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 186 Battery, which later became C/58.  He was promoted to Bdr on 9 Sep 1914 but was reduced to gunner presumably for some misdemeanour on 22 Feb 1915.  He sailed with the brigade to Egypt on 1 Jul 1915, will have served in Gallipoli, and then sailed with the brigade to France in June 1916.  On 15 Sep 1916 he returned to the UK, probably due to illness or having been wounded, and was posted to 5C Reserve Bde.  There is no indication that he served overseas again.  He was ready for discharge from the Convalescent Hospital Crownhill, Plymouth, on 16 Aug 1918, though was not reckoned to be fit for active service so was assigned to 15th (Reserve) Battery at Larkhill.  He was discharged from the Army on 9 Mar 1919 from No.1 Dispersal Unit Fovant with bronchitis and returned to live in Wellington.
Ftr S/Sgt
Patterson
Alexander
51786
D/58
Alexander Patterson was from Killykergan, Coleraine, and first served overseas during the war when he went to France in March 1915, possibly with 118 (Howitzer) Bde.  He was serving in D/58 when he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on 17 Jun 1918.  On 1 Sep 1918 he was sent on a 5 day course to learn how to overhaul machine-guns, since the brigade had recently acquired some for anti-aircraft purposes.  
2/Lt.
Payne 
Humphrey Lancelot Hugo 
   
Humphrey Lancelot Hugo Payne, possibly known as Lancelot, was born on 6 Apr 1895 in Bangalore, India, the son of Edward Henry Payne and Harriet Mary Payne.  He was a University candidate who was appointed a 2/Lt on 16 Sep 1914 , having been posted to join 58 Bde at Leeds two days earlier on 14 Sep 1914.  He must have left the brigade soon afterwards because he went overseas with the BEF later that year, probably with 15 Bde RFA, part of 5 Division.  On 9 Jun 1915 he was promoted to Lt.  He was appointed A/Capt on 1 Oct 1917 before being promoted to Capt on 8 Feb 1918.  After the Armistice he was appointed an A/Maj while commanding a battery between 23 Mar and 17 Aug 1919.  He married twice: to Anthea Penne Firth in 1921 from whom he separated on 27 Jul 1925, and then to Gwendolyn Marguerite Philpot the following year.  He was appointed a Capt in the RFA Reserve on 4 Apr 1923, with seniority from 1 Oct 1917.  He died in Shropshire on 16 Jan 1955, aged 59.  
Cpl.
Peach
Albert Reginald
11301
A/58
Albert Reginald Peach, known as Reginald, was born on 3 Apr 1894 in Litton Cheney, near Dorchester, Dorset, the son of George and Emily Peach.  He worked as a labourer before the war and enlisted into the RFA in Dorchester on 2 Sep 1914, aged 20.  (He may have enlisted at the same time as his near neighbour Sidney Hounsell (11289) who also served in 58 Bde).  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 184 Battery, which became A/58.  He went to Egypt with the brigade and after Gallipoli and going to France he was appointed A/Bdr on 25 Oct 1916 and was promoted to Bdr on 23 Jul 1917.  He was appointed paid A/Cpl on 15 Sep 1917 and was promoted to Cpl on 5 Oct 1917.  On New Year’s Eve 1917 he was part of a carrying party returning through the snow and the ice to the wagon lines when one of the party, Bdr Downall (12686) slipped and dislocated his elbow, so Reginald provided a short witness statement to help show it was an accident.  He was then also involved in an accident on 23 Apr 1918 which resulted in him getting a severe wound to his scalp so was admitted to St John’s Ambulance Brigade Hospital, Etaples.  It is not clear if he returned to the brigade after this.  On 17 Dec 1918 he was posted to 24th (Reserve) Battery, 4B Reserve Bde, Boyton, Wilts and in February 1919 went to the Dispersal Centre Fovant for demobilisation.  In March 1919, he was granted a small pension due to 20% disability caused by a back contusion.  After the war he moved to Lower Edmonton, London, and on 8 Apr 1920 he married Annie Nettleship in Market Rasen, Lincs.  In 1939 he and Annie and their two sons were living in Morden, Surrey and he was working as a commercial heavy driver.  He died on 21 Jan 1977 in Nailsea, near Bristol, aged 82.
Dvr.
Pearce
Alfred George
10968
B/58
Alfred George Pearce (known as George) was born on 31 Dec 1897 in East Coker, Somerset, the son of Alfred Joseph Chaffey Pearce (known as Joseph) and Annie Matilda Pearce.  By 1911, the family had moved to Ryme Intrinseca, Dorset.  George enlisted underage on 31 Aug 1914 in Yeovil claiming to be a 19 year old butcher, when he was in fact only 16 years old.  He was posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea the next day and from there to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which subsequently became B/58.  After service in Egypt and in all probability Gallipoli, he was serving with B/58 in France when he was appointed A/Bdr on 23 Jul 1916 and promoted to Bdr on 7 Aug 1917.  He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field which was gazetted on 25 Jan 1918.  At some point he returned to the UK and was posted to the Royal Artillery and Tank Corps Command Depot at Catterick.  He was then posted to 5B Reserve Bde in 1918 and then was sent to the Dispersal Centre in Ripon on 23 Jan 1919 for demobilisation.  In 1920 he became a dairy farmer, taking over Wilderwick Dairy Farm, Dormansland, Surrey, and on 15 Dec 1920 he married Winifred Frances Potter in Dormansland parish church.  He and Winifred and their family, including George’s mother Annie, were still living at Wilderwick Farm.  He may have died in 1991, aged 93.
Bdr.
Pearce
William
67937
B/58
William Pearce was born in 1894, the son of Thomas Richard and (probably) Jessie Pearce.   He worked as a carman in Clapham, London, and enlisted into the RFA on 5 Jan 1915 in Lambeth.  He was posted to No.4 Depot at Woolwich on 8 Jan 1915 and then to No.2 Depot at Preston on 27 Jan 1915.  From there he was posted to 69 Bde Ammunition Column, 13th Division, on 3 May 1915.  He embarked at Avonmouth on 20 June 1915 and went to Egypt.  He was admitted to hospital in Alexandria with venereal sores on 26 Sep 1915, and after being released was posted to the 13th Base Depot, Mustapha, Alexandria on 28 Oct 1915.  He sailed from Egypt to go to Gallipoli on 15 Nov 1915.  A fortnight later, on 30 Nov 1915, the War Office issued a note to about the separation allowance which had been granted for his mother since she was dependent on him.  However, that allowance was being stopped since his mother had “left her husband and gone away with another man”.  William’s father could be considered for the allowance if William submitted the necessary application.  He was admitted to hospital in Alexandria again with venereal disease on 30 Dec 1915.  He was struck off the strength of 69 Bde and posted to Base Depot, Sidi Bishr on 10 March 1916, then to B/58 at El Ferdan on 16 March 1916.  He sailed with 58 Bde from Alexandria on 25 June 1916, disembarking in Marseilles on 3 July 1916.  He was awarded 7 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by Lt Col Winter on 1 Aug 1916 for damaging private property and indecent language to an NCO.  He was admitted to 11 Division Rest Station with impetigo on 17 Dec 1916, rejoining his battery on 30 Dec 1916.  He was granted Class I Proficiency Pay on 5 Jan 1917.  On 24 Feb 1917, he was admitted to 2/3 West Riding Field Ambulance with suspected phthisis – a progressive wasting disease – on 24 Feb 1917 but was discharged to duty the following day.  He was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK between 16 and 26 June 1917, though the leave was extended to 1 July 1917.  He was appointed paid L/Bdr on 9 Mar 1918, replacing Bdr Weldon (20344) who had been sent to hospital.  He decided though to revert to gunner at his own request on 24 May 1918, the request being approved by Lt Col Wray as OIC 58 Bde.  He was awarded 3 days’ Field Punishment No.2 on 12 Jul 1918 by Maj Cameron for being absent from roll call at parade on 10 July and was awarded a further 7 days’ Field Punishment No.2 on 6 Aug 1918 by Maj Cameron for fighting on parade.  He was granted leave to the UK via Calais between 19 March and 2 April 1919 and was then sent back to the UK for demobilisation via Boulogne on 18 Jun 1919.
2/Lt.
Pearson
Hughes Henry
18627
B/58
Hughes Henry Pearson was born in London on 22 Jul 1881, the son of John Henry and Ada Pearson (née Lester).  In 1891, when he was 9 years old, he was lodging with the Dobson family in Chelsea along with his younger brother John.  In December 1909 he married Lily Collins in Sheffield.  He enlisted into the RFA at some point under service number 18627 and in 1911 he was serving as a Cpl in the Military Barracks, Barrack Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne having previously worked in civilian life as a printer.    After war was declared he was recalled to the Reserve and served in France and Belgium between February and May 1915, and from June to August 1916.  On 31 Aug 1916, the now Sgt Pearson was commissioned as a 2/Lt for services in the field.  He joined B/58 but was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 10 Oct 1916.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Mar 1918 and appointed a Quay Officer (Class HH) on 1 Apr 1920, a post he relinquished on 17 Oct 1920.  He retired on retirement pay on 27 Nov 1920.  In 1939 he and Lily were living in Croydon, Surrey, and he worked as a Night Telephonist with the GPO.  He died in 1948 in Cuckfield, Sussex, aged 67.
Lt.
Peel      
Robert Lloyd 
n/a
A/58
Robert Lloyd Peel was the third son of Herbert and Mary Susannah Ainsworth Peel (née Lee) of Taliaris Park. Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire.  He was born in Llandeilo on 11 Jun 1889 and was educated at Malvern College.  He worked as a tea planter in India before the war and served as a Trooper in the Southern Provinces Mounted Rifles in India, but resigned in order to see active service, so sailed from Colombo, arriving in the UK on 12 Dec 1914.  On 22 Dec 1914, he applied for a regular commission, requesting to join the RFA and was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt the following day.  He was assigned to A/58 and, being 25, he was older than most subalterns so was nicknamed “old John Peel”.  He sailed from Liverpool on 1 Jul 1915 on the “Empress Britain” with seven other 58 Bde officers and their soldier servants, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He re-embarked at Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jan 1916 and was still serving in A/58 later that year when the battery was in France.  When Capt Hutton joined A/58 as the new battery commander in late July 1916, he praised Lt Peel as an “excellent fellow”.  The following month, Lt Peel acted as the town commandant of Magnicourt, and then on 3 Sep 1916 he acted as the Forwarding Observing Officer (FOO) with a battalion of the Black Watch (probably the 4th/5th Black Watch) during an attack astride the River Ancre.  He also acted as a FOO on 27 Sep 1916 when he and the other FOOs “had a very bad time” but had done “very good work”.  A month later, on 24 Oct 1916 an enemy shell hit No.4 gun emplacement.  Lt Peel and Sgt Robert Cameron (93125) took swift action, the brigade War Diary recording “Battery was being shelled and a 5.9″ hit a gun emplacement, wounding some of the detachment and burying the rest.  Lt Peel and Sgt Cameron immediately rushed out and dug the buried men out, thereby saving their lives”.  They saved eight men, though they had all been badly burned, but a ninth had been killed instantly.  Robert Peel was awarded the Military Cross for this action on 20 Nov 1916, the official citation reading “For conspicuous gallantry in action. He and a serjeant rescued several wounded men from a burning gun-pit, and thereby saved many lives. Later, he continued to extinguish the fire, and prevented an explosion of ammunition.”  He went on 10 days’ leave on 9 Dec 1916, returning on 23 Dec 1916.  On 17 Mar 1917 he was wounded, rejoining his battery on 24 Mar 1917.  He acted as a FOO again in a big attack on 7 Jun 1917.  He then had a few days’ leave, returning on 4 Jul 1917.  Then on 3 Sep 1917, he was in the battery position when he was hit by a shell fragment in the abdomen, and according to his commanding officer “though everything possible was done, he knew from the first that he could not live.  It was characteristic of him that he told the doctors not to waste time with him but to get on with the others.  His loss cast a gloom over us all.”  He died of his wounds the same day in 18th Corps Medical Dressing Station, aged 28.  His CO added that Peel was “universally loved for his unfailing courage and disregard of his own comfort.  His unselfishness was of a very rare degree and I don’t think there was ever an opportunity of showing it neglected.  His sense of duty led him almost into absurdities and no doubt his example did much to make the other subalterns the good fellows they were.” He added that “to the end he kept up his reputation as the most unselfish fellow in the world” … “often we had laughed at his habit of selecting the wettest and most uncomfortable place to sleep in and many a time we had told him to look after himself, I don’t think however we quite realized till the end how much his unselfishness was part of his nature.  Few officers can have been regretted more by all.”   Robert Lloyd Peel is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.  His elder brother Capt Alan Ralph Peel had been killed in 1914 in Nigeria.  Their father, Herbert, died 4 months after Robert on 12 Jan 1918.   
Gnr.
Penney
James
11268
C/58
James Penney was born on 22 Oct 1887 in Exhall, Warks, the son of Robert G and Mary Ann Penney.  In 1901, aged 13, he worked as a doorboy in a coal mine.  He became a coal miner and on 28 Dec 1907 he married Sarah Alice Freeman (known at the time as Alice) in Exhall Parish Church.  They had at least three children: Horace, Minnie and Laura.  He enlisted into the RFA in Warwick on 2 Sep 14, aged 26, where he gave and signed his name as James Penny – the spelling that was used throughout his military service.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea, and from there on 10 Sep 1914 to 186 Battery, which became C/58.  He sailed to Egypt with his battery on 1 Jul 1915 but was admitted to 21 General Hospital in Alexandria with dysentery on 29 Sep 1915.  On 10 May 1916 he was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column and from there to join 133 Bde RFA on 22 Jun 1916 arriving just in time to sail with them to France three days later.  When 133 Bde was broken up in November 1916, he was posted back to 58 Bde.  He was wounded by gas and admitted to 56 General Hospital in Etaples on 9 Apr 1918.   After recovering he was posted to Base on 14 May 1918 and from there to 122 Bde RFA on 20 May 1918.  He was wounded a second time – this time receiving a gunshot wound to his left hand so was admitted to 2 Canadian General Hospital in Le Tréport on 1 Oct 1918.  He was posted back to Base on 9 Oct 1918 and then to C/84 Army Artillery Bde on 20 Oct 1918.  After the Armistice he was offered the chance to complete his Army service back in the coal mines.  He therefore returned to the UK on 14 Dec 1918 via Boulogne and Folkestone to return to his old colliery, Exhall.  He was formally demobilised on 31 Mar 1920.  In 1939 he and his wife were living in Coventry, where he worked as a grinder in an engineering works.
Dvr.
Pepper
Samuel John Wood
141038
C/58
Samuel John Wood Pepper was born in Hoyland, near Barnsley, Yorks, in 1889, the son of William Wordsworth and Harriett Elizabeth Pepper (née Robinson).  Harriett died and William re-married.  In 1911 Samuel was still living in Hoyland but was now living with his grandmother, Ann Robinson, and 6 of his siblings, and he was working as a hay and chop merchant. In 1915 he married Elizabeth Wildsmith in Barnsley.  He enlisted into the RFA and was serving in C/58 when he died of wounds on 9 or 10 Oct 1917, aged 28.  He is buried in Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Belgium.  
Dvr.
Percy
Aubrey
10614
D/58
Aubrey Percy was born on 3 Jul 1896 in Marsh Baldon, near Oxford, the son of Francis (known as Frank) and Elizabeth Percy.   He was baptised on 13 Sep 1896 in Marsh Baldon where the family were still living in 1901.  In 1911 the family was living in Balsall Heath, Birmingham and Aubrey was working as a butcher’s boy, aged 14.  He was working as a shop assistant when he enlisted into the RFA in Birmingham on 1 Sep 1914, claiming to be 20 years old when he was in fact 18.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 58 Bde Ammunition Column on 13 Sep 1914.  He developed tonsillitis so spent 8 days in the Military Hospital in Leeds between 17 and 24 Dec 1914.  He was transferred into the newly-formed D/58 on 21 Jan 1915.  He sailed from Devonport with his battery on 3 July 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 17 July 1915 and then landed on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance on Gallipoli with jaundice on 21 Nov 1915, returning to duty on 25 Nov 1915.  Back in Egypt, he was posted to join the HQ of 58 Bde on 28 Jan 1916 and sailed from Alexandria with the brigade on 25 Jun 1916, landing in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  On 1 Sep 1916 he was awarded a Good Conduct Badge.  He was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK between 10 and 20 Aug 1917.  In January 1918 he was attached to 11 Division Royal Artillery HQ.  On 30 Oct 1918 he was clipping a horse when it lashed out and kicked him on the nose and forehead.   He was sent for demobilisation to No.1 Dispersal Centre Chiseldon which he attended on 8 Feb 1919.  After the war he married Annie Godson in King’s Norton, Warks in 1920.  In 1939 he and Annie were living in Birmingham where he was working as a butcher’s assistant.  He died in Worcester in 1980 aged 84.  
Dvr.
Petty
Joseph
152339
C/58
Joseph Petty, sometimes known as Joe, was born on 24 Dec 1885 in Knottingley, Yorks, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Petty.  Like his father, he worked as a butcher.   He was killed in action on 20 Jun 1918 alongside two other members of C/58, Leslie Savage and John Caton.   All three are buried alongside each other in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France.
A/Capt.
Pharazyn
William Noel 
n/a
B/58
William Noel Pharazyn was a New Zealander born on 10 Apr 1894 in Wellington, NZ.  He attended Nelson College and then Dulwich College, before attending the Royal Military Academy Woolwich and was commissioned as a 2/Lt on 12 Aug 1914, the same day as another future 58 Bde officer, David Aikenhead.  He served in France with 35 Bde in 1914 and so was awarded the 1914 Star.  He was promoted to Lt on 9 Jun 1915.  He was wounded on the Somme in 1916 and joined B/58 on 1 May 1917 as a temporary Capt, relinquishing the acting rank of Major on ceasing to command a battery.  At the end of the same month, he was described as a Major when he went on 10 days’ leave on 30 May 1917 and had another period of leave from 6 Oct 1917.  He was formally promoted to Capt on 3 Nov 1917 (although was an acting Major at the time).  He was awarded the Military Cross while serving with 35 Bde again, gazetted on 1 Jan 1919.  After the war he married Lydia Helen Hughes Field on 26 Nov 1919 in Wellington and stayed on in the Army before retiring in 1923.  He subsequently became a Marxist and a supporter of trades unions though renounced his Marxism following the Stalinist purges in the Soviet Union.  He was recalled for military service in 1940 and appointed Military Attaché for New Zealand in Washington with the rank of Lt Col in 1941, serving there for 4 years.  He died on 11 Jun 1980 in Wellington, Lydia having died in 1971.  They had no children.    The Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, Ta Ara, has an article on him.
Dvr.
Phillips
Harold Sidney
65214
D/58
Harold Sidney Phillips was born on 23 Mar 1894 in Birmingham, the son of Frederick Charles Phillips, who had been born Leopold Frederick Kuhczinsky, a Polish Jew who escaped the pogroms by coming to England, and Frances Phillips, née Barratt.  In 1911 he was living with his family in Birmingham and was working as a core maker in an aluminium works but enlisted into the RFA in Birmingham on 6 May that year, aged 18.  He served in 125 Battery, 46 Battery and 103 Battery in Bordon, Hants, before being posted overseas in 1913 to serve in 83 Battery in Karachi, India [now Pakistan] and then 98 Battery in Nasirabad, India.  During all this time he regularly ran into trouble for not obeying orders, absence and insolence.  After war was declared many units were recalled from India to join the BEF in France, so on 12 Oct 1914 Harold was posted to 11 Bde RFA and arrived in France on about 7 Nov 1914.  He was admitted to No.4 General Hospital, Versailles, on 6 Feb 1915 and had been discharged by 5 Mar 1915 when he wrote a postcard to his sister.  In 1917, while serving in 7 Division Ammunition Column, he was in No.1 Stationary Hospital Rouen.  But he broke out of the hospital at about 9 p.m. on 15 Jul 1917 and was absent for 4 days until he turned himself in back at the hospital on 19 Jul 1917.  Probably shortly after being discharged from the hospital he was posted to D/58 and he was serving in that battery when he was killed in action on 15 Aug 1917, the day before the Battle of Langemarck.  He may have been bringing up ammunition ready for the opening barrage when he was killed.  He was 22 and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.
Gnr.
Pierce
Frank
226671
C/58
Frank Pierce was born on 6 Oct 1892 in Westbury-on-Trym and baptised in Horfield, Bristol.  He was the son of Edwin Thomas and Elizabeth Pierce (née Reakes).  In 1911 he was working on his father’s farm in Horfield.  He enlisted in Bristol and was serving in C/58 on 8 or 9 Oct 1918 when a bomb was dropped in front of a gun pit killing him and wounding two others.  He died just after his 26th birthday and is buried in Sains-Les-Marquion British Cemetery, France.
Gnr.
Pilkington
Percy
117851
B/58
Percy Pilkington was born on 13 Jul 1888 in Elton, Bury, Lancs.  He was the younger son of Hubert and Alice Pilkington.  In 1901 the family were living in Wilmslow, and then in 1911 they were in nearby Alderley Edge and Percy was working as a salesman for a home trade warehouse.  He enlisted into the RFA in Manchester and was serving in B/58 when he died of wounds on 1 Oct 1917, aged 29.  He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.  
Gnr.
Plant
   
A/58?
Gnr Plant was at Zahrieh Camp on the outskirts of Alexandria in Egypt on 20 Jul 1915 when he witnessed Gnr George McGuire (93021) being drunk and his conduct deemed prejudicial of military discipline.  
Dvr.
Plummer
John Henry
211177
D/58
John Henry Plummer (sometimes given as Henry John Plummer) was born in Holloway, Islington, London in about 1889.  He worked as a cattle drover and was married to Kate Mirian Plummer.  They had at least one son.  He enlisted into the RFA in Islington and was serving in D/58 when died of wounds at No.1 Casualty Clearing Station at Escaudouevres, France.  He was originally buried in cemetery of the local convent but after the war he was re-interred in Ramillies British Cemetery, France.
Lt.
Power
William Henry
n/a
D/58
Lt William Henry Power was commissioned as a 2/Lt into the infantry on 8 Jul 1915.  He transferred as a 2/Lt from the Machine Gun Corps to the Royal Engineers on 22 Nov 1915.  He went to France in May 1916.  On 1 Dec 1918 he rejoined D/58 from hospital but the following day he returned to the UK and so was struck off the strength of 58 Bde.  He was appointed an A/Capt on 2 Feb 1919 and relinquished his commission on 4 Jan 1920 and was granted the rank of Captain.   
Sgt.
Pratley
John
2712
 
John Pratley enlisted on 1 Sep 1914.  He had been promoted to Cpl when he first went to France on 22 Aug 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 10 Jan 1919 being unfit for military service due to wounds he had received.  
Dvr.
Pratt
   
A/58
Driver Pratt left A/58 on 13 Aug 1918 when he was posted back to the UK for a 6 month tour at home.
BQMS
Prestidge
Herbert
10598
C/58
Herbert Prestidge was born in Newbold-on-Avon, near Rugby, Warks on 24 Jun 1894, the only child of Daniel and Emma Prestidge.  He worked as an engineer, apprenticed to the company Williams and Robertson in Rugby for 5 years from 1911.  But he cut short his apprenticeship to enlist into the RFA in Rugby on 5 Sep 1914, aged 20.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to C/58 on 10 Sep 1914.  He was rapidly promoted through the ranks: he was appointed an unpaid A/Bdr on 28 Nov 1914 and promoted to a paid A/Bdr on 1 Feb 1915 and then to Bdr on 24 Mar 1915.  He was promoted to Cpl on 27 Apr 1915 (though this was ante-dated to 20 Apr 1915) and was then promoted again, this time to Sgt on 11 May 1915.   He sailed from Devonport with the brigade on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  On 5 Oct 1915 he was wounded by a gunshot to his left hand and after visiting 26 Casualty Clearing Station was transferred on the Hospital Ship “Gloucester Castle” to Egypt where he was admitted to the “Citadel” on 10 Oct 1915.  Three days later he was transferred to the Convalescent Depot at Abbassia.  On 30 Oct 1915 he headed back to Mudros when he was posted to 11 (Northern) Division’s base.  He rejoined C/58 back in Alexandria on 20 Jan 1916 and was appointed A/Battery Quarter Master Sergeant on 9 Feb 1916, still only aged 21.  He sailed from Alexandria with the brigade on 25 Jun 1916, landing in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  On 12 Nov 1916 he was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK and shortly after he returned, he reverted to Gnr from BQMS at his own request on 8 Dec 1916.  He was transferred back to the UK on 2 Mar 1917 for munitions work and was sent back to work for his old employer, Williams and Robinson Ltd, Victoria Works, Rugby.  He was discharged surplus to military requirements on 14 Dec 1918.  He married Beatrice A Walker in 1925 in Nuneaton, Warks.  In 1939 he and Beatrice were living in Nuneaton where Herbert worked as a fitter of gun turrets in aircraft.  He died in 1968, aged 74.
Gnr.
Price
Henry
22323
 
Henry Price enlisted into the RFA on 3 Sep 1914.  He was first posted overseas when he went to France on 10 Sep 1915.  At some point he joined 58 Bde, since he was serving with the brigade when he was discharged from the Army on 17 May 1918 as being no longer fit for military service due to wounds he had received.  He was therefore awarded the Silver War Badge.
Dvr.
Priddle
Henry George
10569
C/58
Henry George Priddle, often known as Harry, was born on 6 Aug 1893 in Hambridge, near Langport, Somerset, the son of Samuel and Catherine Pile Priddle (née Nation).  In 1911 he was working as a farm labourer but when he enlisted into the RFA on 3 Sep 1914 he had been working as a brewer.  He enlisted in Taunton, aged 21, alongside another Hambridge man, Wilfred Oatey (also of C/58 and with service number 10570) and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there he was posted to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which became C/58.  He sailed to Egypt with 58 Bde on 1 Jul 1915 and served with his battery at Gallipoli.  However, within a few days of landing on Gallipoli, he was evacuated with enteric fever and was admitted to 17 General Hospital in Alexandria on 19 Sep 1915 before being transferred to the Transit Convalescent Camp at Port Said on 31 Oct 1915.  On 24 Nov 1915 he sailed from Alexandria on the Hospital Ship “Dover Castle” arriving back in the UK on 4 Dec 1915 and was admitted to the 2nd Western General Hospital in Manchester the following day and posted to 5C Reserve Bde that same day.  The hospital declared him fit but only for light duties so granted him furlough between 4 Apr and 10 May 1916.  He was then posted to the Royal Artillery Command Depot, Ripon, on 19 May 1916 and then to 4A Reserve Bde on 16 Jun 1916.  Between his release from hospital and going abroad again, he overstayed leave twice and was absent from stables at least once.  He then was posted overseas again on 11 Nov 1916 when he was sent to Salonika where he joined 84 Small Arms Ammunition Group (SAAG), 146 Bde on 19 Dec 1916.  On 22 Aug 1917, 84 SAAG was transferred to 3 Bde RFA.  After the Armistice he sailed on 13 Mar 1919 to return to the UK, arriving on 3 Apr 1919.  He went for dispersal in Liverpool on 26 Apr 1919 at which point he was described as serving in 18 Battery, 3 Bde RFA, 28 Division.  However, he was sick and was suffering from gastritis and malaria and it may have been at this time that he was admitted to the Lord Derby War Hospital in Warrington.  As a result of his sickness he was awarded a small weekly pension of 5s 6d for at least a year. He was demobilised on 4 May 19.  He married three times, to Mabel K Old in 1920, to Ellen Louisa West in 1929 (both of whom died young) and then to Violet Habberfield in 1938.  In 1939 he and Violet were living in Isle Abbotts, just a few miles from Hambridge, where Harry worked as a pig and poultry farmer.   He died on 28 Oct 1977.  
Gnr.
Prince
Walter Thomas
10685
C/58
Walter Thomas Prince was born on 26 Oct 1892 in Atherstone, Warks, the son of Joseph Henry and Maria Prince.  After leaving school, he served briefly in the Army but was discharged.  On 16 Mar 1913, he married Eliza Holland in St Mary’s church, Atherstone and they had at least two sons, Walter Thomas and Joseph Arthur Prince.  He worked as a coal miner and after war was declared he enlisted into the RFA in Atherstone on 1 Sep 1914, aged 22.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to C/58 on 10 Sep 1914.  He was confined to barracks for 10 days by Lt Col Kuper for being absent between 10 p.m. on 3 Feb 1915 until he was found in bed at 7.05 a.m. the next day, and for using insubordinate language to an NCO.  Two weeks later he was absent from church parade on 21 Feb 1915, so was awarded a further 4 days’ confinement to barracks by Capt Angus.  He sailed with 58 Bde from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He re-embarked at Alexandria on 24 Jul 1915 before heading for Gallipoli.  He was appointed A/Cpl on 6 Nov 1915 and after returning to Egypt he sailed with 58 Bde from Alexandria on 25 Jun 1916 to head for France and Flanders, landing in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916.  He was reprimanded for neglect of duty by 2/Lt French in August 1916 and the following month he sprained his ankle on 24 Sep 1916 at Bouzincourt while bringing ammunition from the wagon lines to the guns.  As a result, he was admitted to 77 Field Ambulance and then 22 General Hospital before being evacuated to the UK on the Hospital Ship “Brighton” on 3 Oct 1916.  On arrival back in the UK he was admitted to 2nd Birmingham War Hospital on 4 Oct 1916, staying there until 27 Oct 1916 at which point, he was transferred to the Convalescent Hospital, Eastbourne where he stayed until 21 Dec 1916.  He was then posted to No.7 Depot RFA on 25 Dec 1916.  He served in 51 (Reserve) Battery at Charlton Park and on 13 Feb 1917 he was admonished for “whilst being on active duty refusing to have a bath” and a few days later he was admonished again for neglect of duty.  He was sent back overseas and was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 10 Jun 1917, then back to C/58 on 17 Jun 1917.  He was wounded in his right arm on 12 Sep 1917 by a shrapnel SW right arm admitted to 1/2 Highland Field Ambulance.  12 Sep 1917.  Three days later after having stayed in No.20 General Hospital, he was evacuated back to the UK, again on Hospital Ship “Brighton”.  He was admitted to the War Hospital in Reading on 15 Sep 1917 and stayed there until he was discharged on 21 Dec 1917.  He was posted to the Clearing Office, 1 Collecting Station, Catterick on 2 Jan 1918.  He returned to France on 2 Apr 1918, was posted to 311 Army Bde on 17 Apr 1918 and was promoted to Sgt on 9 Jun 1918.  He served in B/311 and after the Armistice returned to the UK via Boulogne on the SS “Yale” on 18 Dec 1918, going to No.2 Dispersal Unit, Chiseldon on 19 Dec 1918.  After the war he continued to suffer pains in his right elbow which were sometimes shooting.  In 1939 he, Eliza and their son Joseph were living in Atherstone, where Walter worked as a roadman in a mine.     
Gnr.
Proude
George
2744
A/58
George Proude was born in Wolverhampton in about 1896, the son of Emma Maud Proude.  By 1901 his mother had married a Henry James Bolt.  In 1911, George was working as a filer in a lock works, aged 15.  He enlisted into the RFA in Wolverhampton and was sent overseas to serve in Egypt or Salonika on 7 Aug 1915.  Two years later he was serving in A/58 when he died on 4 Oct 1917 of wounds.  He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery.
2/Lt.
Pyle
Henry Dixon
n/a
B/58
Henry Dixon Pyle was born in about 1897 in New South Wales, Australia.  He was educated in the UK at the North Eastern County School for Boys in Barnard Castle.  He served in the Yeomanry regiment, the Scottish Horse, before being commissioned into the RFA on 9 Feb 1918.  He was posted to join the 11 Division Ammunition Column and was then attached to B/58 on 28 Apr 1918, but a few days later he was transferred to C/58 on 1 May 1918.  On 29 Jul 1918, he and two NCOs went on a gas course at 1 Corps school, returning to the brigade on 10 Aug 1918.  Soon after he went on a 3 week long Forward Observation Officer and Signallers course at the 11 Division Artillery school on 20 Aug 1918.  He left 58 Bde on 3 Nov 1918 when he was posted to 49 Division Artillery.  He resigned his commission on 2 Feb 1919.  On 6 Jul 1922 he sailed from London bound for his native Australia and was described as a farmer.  He appears to have died on 9 Mar 1929 and was buried in Woronara Memorial Park, near Sydney, Australia.
Dvr.
Rabone
Morris
11271
B/58
Morris Rawbone was born in Wellesbourne, Warks on 24 Jan 1895, the son of George and Anne Rawbone.  In 1911 he was working as a labourer and in 1914 as a groom.  When he enlisted into the RFA in Warwick on 2 Sep 1914, he was 19 years old and was known as Morris Rabone, later in life also re-spelling his first name so became Maurice Rabone.  After enlisting he was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which became B/58.  He was appointed as a driver and he sailed with the brigade to Alexandria on 1 Jul 1915.  It is likely that he went to Gallipoli when his battery went there on 9 Aug 1915, but he fell sick and so was evacuated back to the UK, arriving on 9 Sep 1915 and was admitted to No.2 Southern General Hospital in Bristol probably on the same day, also being assigned to 5C Reserve Brigade at the same time.  He was posted to 4A Reserve Brigade, Woolwich, on 15 Oct 1915 and then to 22 Reserve Battery, 4B Reserve Brigade at Boyton, near Warminster, on 5 Nov 1915.    While at Boyton he was reported as having been absent in the nearby village of Codford at about 10.10 p.m. on 1 Oct 1916.  He attended the Ordnance College and was assessed as being a skilled fitter on 17 Apr 1917 and so was appointed as a fitter that day.  He returned overseas when he went to France on 25 Oct 1917 and served with the trench mortars of 38 Division in December 1917.  He was then serving with 42 Division Ammunition Column when he was wounded on 30 Jun 1918 with gunshot wounds (probably caused by shrapnel) to his back, left thumb and right leg.  He was admitted to 3 General Hospital in Le Tréport on 2 Jul 1918 and then evacuated to the UK on 17 Jul 1918 where he was admitted to Berrington War Hospital in Shrewsbury.  He married Lilian Robinson on 9 Nov 1918 in Plumstead.  He attended No.1 Dispersal Unit at Purfleet on 29 Jan 1919 for demobilisation and was demobilised on 26 Feb 1919 though his claim for a pension due to an inguinal hernia was rejected.  After the war he lived in Wootton, near Bedford and he and Lilian had at least one son.  Shortly after the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939 they were living in Stewartby, near Bedford, and they appeared to have taken two evacuee children into their home.  Maurice was working as a labourer in a brick works at the time as well as being an assistant ARP warden.  He died in 1961, aged 66.  
Dvr.
Rainey
William George
10566
D/58
William George Rainey was born in Weston Zoyland, near Bridgwater, Somerset, on 26 Aug 1893 the son of George Edmond and Charlotte Ann Rainey.  In 1911 he was working as an agricultural labourer, aged 17.  After war was declared he enlisted on 3 Sep 1914 in Taunton and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there he was posted 58 Bde Ammunition Column (BAC) as a driver on 13 Sep 1914.  He transferred with the rest of the BAC into the new D/58 on 21 Jan 1915.  He sailed from Devonport with his battery on 3 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  After the brigade had been withdrawn from Gallipoli and was stationed by the Suez Canal at el Ferdan, he was posted to the Headquarters of 58 Bde on 18 Mar 1916.  He sailed with the brigade to France and the following year was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK between 13 and 23 May 1917.  He was wounded on 2 Sep 1917 and, while records do not say in what way, it was presumably slight because he remained at duty.  He went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 16 Feb 1918 and had been due to return to his unit by 3 Mar 1918 but had not done so by 12 Mar 1918 so the Acting Adjutant of 58 Bde, Capt G H Colson, set in motion an investigation as to his whereabouts.  It transpired that William had been unwell and had been under treatment by a Dr Moorhead but on 11 Mar 1918 he was fit to begin the return journey to France and so rejoined 58 Bde on 14 Mar 1918.  Soon after his return he was attached to the HQ 11 Div Royal Artillery.  He had a small operation at No.1 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station for a deep abscess on his left buttock on 22 Sep 1918 and was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance the same day.  He was transferred to 32 Stationary Hospital two days later and was evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “de Coninck” on 28 Sep 1918.  Once back in the UK he was admitted to an unnamed hospital which he left on 15 Oct 1918 and was then posted to 59 Reserve Battery on 27 Oct 1918.  A month later, he suffered an inflammation of connecting tissue in his left hand and was in hospital for 20 days between 27 Nov and 16 Dec 18.  On 2 Feb 1919, he was ordered to go to No.2 Dispersal Centre Fovant ready for demobilisation, which he attended two days later.   He applied for a pension due to injury to his testicles, though this was not attributed to his war service so no pension was awarded.  He married Clarissa D Sellick and they had at least 5 children.   In 1939 he and Clarissa were still living in Weston Zoyland and William was working as a farm labourer.  He died in 1965, aged 72.  
2/Lt.
Ramsey
 
n/a
B/58
On 24 Feb 1917, a 2/Lt Ramsey was posted from 11 Division Ammunition Column to join B/58.  
A/Cpl.
Rea
Dennis
41599
C/58?
Dennis Rea (occasionally mis-spelled as Dennis Rae) was born in Loughrea, Co. Galway in about 1880.  He served in 110 Battery RFA at some point before the war and was working as a miner when he re-enlisted into the RFA in Preston on 2 Sep 1914, aged 34.  He was posted initially to No.2 Depot at Preston.  He sailed to Alexandria from the UK, arriving on 14 Jul 1915 so may have been serving in 58 Bde at this time.  He was definitely serving in 58 Bde – probably in C/58 – as a Cpl on 6 Nov 1915 at Gallipoli when his place was taken by Walter Prince (10685).  It is not clear if Dennis had been promoted or if he had been evacuated due to sickness or wounds.  At some point he was made an A/Sgt and was posted from the Mediterranean theatre to Salonika on 25 Jun 1916.  He died in an accident in Salonika while serving as an A/Sgt with D/101 on 26 Nov 1916.  He is buried in Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece.  
Sgt .
Read
     
Sgt Read found Dvr Neil McLean (93026) smoking in the canteen in Chapeltown Barracks, Leeds on 23 Jan 1915 in Leeds when he should have been at roll call. 
2/Lt.
Reade
John Bacon
n/a
A/58
John Bacon Reade first served in France as a dispenser in the British Red Cross Society hospital in Rouen, landing in France with the BEF on 23 Sep 1914.  He subsequently sought a commission so attended an Officer Cadet Unit and was commissioned as 2/Lt in the RFA on 4 Dec 1916.  He was posted to join 11 Division Ammunition Column from the Base on 10 Mar 1917 and 5 days later was attached to A/58.  The following month he was at the C/58 battery position in Arras when he was wounded along with the OIC of C/58, Maj E J Franklin, and 10 other soldiers on 9 Apr 1917.  He may have left 58 Bde after this wounding, but his Army career came to an end the following year when he was cashiered for forgery which was reported in brief detail in the London Gazette: “2/LT J B Reade is removed from the Army, the King having no further occasion for his services as an officer, 8th Jan 1918.”  As a result, he was not issued with the medals to which he would otherwise have been entitled.
Bdr.
Reader
James Edward
93050
C/58
James Edward Reader was born in East Ham, London, the son of James E and Elizabeth Reader.  He enlisted into the RFA in Mill Hill, NW London.  He went overseas, arriving in Egypt on 17 Jul 1915.  He was serving in C/58 when he was killed in action on 25 Aug 1917.  Killed alongside him were Gnr Joseph Bell (74801), Gnr George Gay (141494), Sgt Albert Lamb (75120), Gnr Edmund Saunders (92098) and Gnr Harold Saunders (43356).  They are buried alongside each other in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium. 
Saddler
Reaney
   
A/58
On 7 May 1918, Saddler Reaney left A/58 because he was surplus to the battery’s needs and so was transferred to 55 Division Ammunition Column.
Sgt.
Redding
   
A/58
Sgt Redding served in A/58 and was cited as a witness to the offences of three men: Dvr William Birch (A/58, 11284) being absent from roll-call at Chapeltown Barracks, Leeds on 15 Nov 1914; Dvr Neil McLean (B/58, 93026) who missed roll-call on 28 Jan 1915 and was found smoking in the canteen; and Gnr George McGuire (A/58, 93021) who was drunk and whose conduct was deemed to be prejudicial of military discipline at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria, on 20 Jul 1915. 
Gnr.
Redfern  
Ernest James
11120
B/58
Ernest James Redfern was born in Coventry on 26 Mar 1897, the son of John and Hannah Redfern.  In 1911 he was 14 years old and was working as a drilling machine operator making motor fittings.  He enlisted into the RFA in Rugby on 4 Sep 1915 describing himself as 19 years old – when he was in fact only 17 – and a tool-maker.  He was posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea the following day and from there to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914, which later became B/58.  For some reason he had to re-do his enlistment at Chapeltown Barracks, Leeds on 10 Dec 1914.  Shortly before the brigade went overseas he was posted to the HQ staff of B/58 on 25 May 1915.  He went overseas with his battery, sailing from the UK on 1 Jul 1915 but probably while at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, fell sick.  He was evacuated back to the UK and was admitted to the Lord Derby War Hospital in Warrington on 9 Nov 1915 and was posted to 5C Reserve Bde the same day.  He remained in the UK until the following summer: on 17 Apr 1916 he was posted to 37 Reserve Battery, 1C Reserve Bde then to 4A Reserve Bde on 30 May 1916.  He was posted to France, arriving there on 17 Jun 1916 and, after a few days in No.2 General Base Depot, he joined Y Battery RHA on 23 Jun 1916.  On 1 Dec 1916, Y Battery RHA joined 7th RHA Brigade.  He was awarded 3 days’ Field Punishment No.2 for not complying with an order.  In June 1917 he was admitted to No.9 Cavalry Field Ambulance.  On 9 Oct 1917 he was sick again, and was admitted to No.10 Stationary Hospital, St Omer with an as yet undiagnosed condition.  Presumably after recovering, he was posted to the Base Depot at Le Havre on 25 Oct 1917.  A few weeks later, he was posted to O Battery RHA on 16 Nov 1917 and soon after, on 8 Dec 1917 was appointed a paid A/Bdr on 8 Dec 1917.  A month later he was promoted to Bdr on 8 Jan 1918 and was awarded the Military Medal on 29 Apr 1918.  He was appointed an A/Cpl on 4 Jun 1918 and promoted to Cpl the same day.  He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 22 Jun 1918, the citation stating: “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He advanced with Forward Observation Officer behind infantry and maintained visual communication all day under exceptionally heavy shell fire.  Through his absolute disregard for danger much valuable information was passed back to brigade headquarters when all other channels of communication with the infantry had failed.”  On 4 Aug 1918 he was admitted to a field ambulance with an as yet undiagnosed condition and transferred to hospital 5 days later.  He was appointed a signaller on 22 Oct 1918 and after the Armistice, still serving in O Battery RHA, he was granted leave to the UK between 26 Dec 1918 and 9 Jan 1919.  He attended No.2 Dispersal Centre at Chisledon for demobilisation on 26 Jan 1919 and then returned to his parents’ home in Coventry and opted to have his medals presented to him in a public ceremony.  In 1939 he was still living in Coventry and was working as a commercial traveller selling flour and provender.  He was also married, to Grace A Redfern.  He died in Coventry in 1989, aged 92.  
Maj.
Reeves
Robert Clanmalier
n/a
 
Robert Clanmalier Reeves was born on 13 Mar 1878 in Glandore, Co. Cork, the son of Isaac Morgan Reeves and Adelaide Reeves (née Ussher).  He was commissioned into the RFA in about 1900 and was promoted to Lt in about 1902.  On 5 Jan 1905, he married Margaret Mackay in St James’s Church, Trowbridge and they had at least a son and a daughter.  When the war broke out he was a Captain, but was promoted to Major on 30 Oct 1914 and joined the BEF, landing in France on 2 Nov 1914.  It is not clear when he joined 58 Bde – he did not sail with the brigade from the UK in early July 1915 – but he was serving with them as a battery commander at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli in late September 1915 and on the 24th he was selected to superintend the building of emplacements for new batteries of guns due to arrive in the Suvla Bay area.  On 6 Oct 1915 he was ordered to proceed two days later to Mudros from Suvla Bay, along with Capt Heywood and 2/Lt Edney-Hayter and to report to the Base Commandant on Mudros when he got there, so presumably left 58 Bde at that point.  Later in the war he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the 1918 New Year’s Honours.  While stationed in Swanage, Dorset, along with several of his brother officers, he joined the Freemasons and was initiated on 18 Feb 1918.  He was appointed brigade commander of 186 Bde RFA in 39 Division on 1 Sep 1918 and was appointed an acting Lt Col on 11 Sep 1918, relinquishing that acting rank on 12 Jun 1919.   He stayed on in the Army until 18 Nov 1930 when, after four years serving as a Regimental Lt. Col. he went onto the half-pay list.  In 1939 he and Margaret were living in Liss Forest, Hants.  He died in Hampshire on 18 Nov 1957, aged 79.
Gnr.
Reid
James
93479
B/58
James Reid was born in Dundee, the son of William Reid.  He worked as a confectioner and served in the Territorial Force with the City of Dundee Battery, RFA.  On 26 Aug 1914 he enlisted into the regular Army, aged 24, and was posted the same day to No.6 Depot at Glasgow.  From there he was posted to 185 Battery on 14 Sep 1914, which subsequently became B/58.  On 11 Dec 1914, due to what appears to have been a clerical error, he had to re-enlist while at Leeds.  He was appointed an unpaid A/Bdr on 19 Apr 1915 and was promoted to Bdr a few weeks later on 16 May 1915.  He sailed with 58 Bde from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Sep 1915 and disembarked at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  On 2 Sep 1915 he was appointed A/Cpl.  After arriving back in Egypt from Gallipoli, he was admitted to hospital at Ward-el-Din, Alexandria with a dislocated shoulder and so reverted to his substantive rank of Bdr.  From hospital he went first to Nasrieh Schools Military Hospital in Cairo and then to the Base Depot at Sidi Bishr.  In about July 1916 he was posted to the Ammunition Column (AC) of 146 Bde RFA at Salonika.  This unit was renumbered as 3 Bde AC RFA on 22 Aug 1917.  On 24 Dec 1918 he was appointed A/Sgt and was sent for demobilisation on 8 Apr 1919 to the Dispersal Unit at Kinross.  In 1921 he appears to have been working in the sanitary depot, Eastern District Office in Hong Kong.  
Gnr.
Reid
   
A/58?
Gunner Reid probably served in A/58.  On 11 Oct 1914 he was cited as one of the witnesses who verified that Gnr George McGuire (93021) had gone absent without leave while they were training at Chapeltown Barracks in Leeds.  Probably the same man had been promoted to Sgt by the end of January 1915 because a Sgt Reid witnessed the absence from roll-call of Dvr William Birch (11284) at Chapeltown Barracks on 31 Jan 1915, and he also witnessed McGuire being drunk and behaving in a way that was deemed prejudicial to military discipline at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria, on 20 Jul 1915.   
Bdr.
Rice
Sidney George
880190
D/58
Sidney George Rice was born on 3 Nov 1894 in Aldgate, London, the younger of two sons of Charles Henry and Jane Rice (née Collett).  The family were living in Royal Mint Street in the City of London at the time.  In 1911, they were living in West Ham in the East End of London and Sidney was working as an assistant in a draper’s, aged 16.  He enlisted into the Territorial Force in Romford, Essex, and served initially in the 2nd East Anglian Bde RFA.  On 23 Aug 1918 he was serving in D/58 and was one of several men helping get a wagon out of a ditch when an enemy aeroplane swooped down and dropped 5 bombs on the party.  Nine of the men were killed with another man later dying of wounds.  He is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, France.
Gnr.
Rich
George Sanderson
20842
 
George Sanderson Rich was born in Ecclesfield, Yorks on 16 Aug 1886, the son of William and Agnes Rich.  In 1901 he was working as a stable boy, aged 14.  In about 1910 he married Ellen Keyworth and the following year he was working in an iron works and they were living in Sheffield.  He enlisted into the RFA on 5 Sep 1914.  He went overseas arriving in the Balkans or Mediterranean theatre of war on 28 Jul 1918.  He had been serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 7 Aug 1918 due to wounds he had received.  In 1939 he, his wife Ellen and their daughter also called Ellen were living in Sheffield, and George was working as a gateman.
L/Bdr.
Richardson
Arthur E
940166
D/58
Arthur E Richardson enlisted into the Territorial Force and served initially in 4th London Bde RFA.  He was serving with D/58 when the absent voters list for Lewisham was compiled in the autumn of 1918.  
Gnr.
Riding
William
79459
D/58
Born in about 1881 in Chorley, Lancs, William Riding married Elizabeth Ellen Roughsedge in Sacred Heart’s Church, Chorley on 16 Apr 1904 and they had at least 3 sons.  William was a builder’s labourer working for Brindle & Sons, Contractors, in Chorley from about 1906 and Elizabeth worked as a cotton weaver.  They had at least 3 sons.  William enlisted in Chorley on 25 Jan 1915, aged 34.  He was posted initially to No.2 Depot in Preston the same day and then as a driver to 17 Division Artillery on 1 Feb 1915. On 15 Apr 1915 he was mustered as a gunner and two days later, on the 17th, he was posted to 81 Bde Ammunition Column and went to France with them on 13 Jul 1915.  On 12 Aug 1915 he was posted to 118 Bde Ammunition Column and from there the following year to one of the batteries of that brigade, 458 (Howitzer) battery on 18 May 1916.   Along with the rest of the battery, he was transferred to 58 Bde on 15 Jul 1916 to form the new D/58.  While D/58 was serving in the Ypres salient, he was probably acting as the cook for the D/58 officers’ mess and was in the mess when a shell struck it, severely wounding him with shrapnel wounds to his thigh, chest and both arms, on 6 Aug 1917.  He was admitted to 8 Stationary Hospital, Wimereux but was then evacuated to the UK on 8 Sep 1917 and was admitted to George East Ward (2), Edmonton Military Hospital after he arrived back in the UK.  By February 1918 he was staying in the Military Hospital Fulwood, Preston and on 18 Mar 1918 he was sent home and discharged from the Army as being no longer fit for active service on 18 Mar 1918.  He was paid a pension for a year which started at 27s/6d in the first few weeks before decreasing over time to 19s/3d in the final 3 months.  He died in Chorley on 26 Mar 1924 from basal meningitis, aged 44.  In Richard Blaker’s semi-autobiographical novel, “Medal Without Bar”, the character “Riding” is very likely a portrayal of William Riding.  If so, he was a hard worker, a man with no frills and very happy to help others by lancing boils “better, it was affirmed, than the Doctor” 
2/Lt.
Rivers-Smith
Percy Eric
n/a
58 Bde AC
Percy Eric Rivers-Smith was born on 27 Aug 1897 in Hendon, Middx. He was the son of Percy Rivers-Smith and Florence Collette Peteress Rivers-Smith (née D’Ardenne). He attended University College and served in their Officers Training Corps. He was commissioned into the RFA as a 2/Lt on 10 Oct 1914 and was posted overseas the next year, arriving in Egypt on about 25 Sep 1915. The following year he appeared to be serving in 58 Bde Ammunition Column in Egypt when he was transferred into the new 133 (Howitzer) Bde. He was appointed an Acting Captain on 3 Jan 1918, relinquishing that rank on 4 Jun 1919 and was discharged from the Army on 31 Mar 1920. After the war, he enlisted into the Territorial Force, joining the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) on 28 Jun 1920 with service number 1396084 and was posted as a Driver to A Battery. However 6 months later on 14 Dec 1920 he left the HAC at his own request. He died in London in 1933, aged 35.
Capt.
Roberts    
Carlton Francis
n/a
D/58
Carlton Francis Roberts was born on 25 Feb 1890 in Wanstead, Essex, the son of Carlton and Georgina Mary Roberts (née Francis).  He attended Glengorse School in Eastbourne and then Berkhampsted School before taking up a career as an engineer, starting as a Thorneycroft apprentice.  He joined the Territorial Force in 1911 becoming a soldier in the Hampshire Carabiniers Yeomanry until 17 Oct 1914 on which date he was appointed a 2/Lt in 81 Bde RFA and was confirmed in that rank on 28 Oct 1915.  He was promoted to Lt on 9 Jun 1915 and went to France with his battery on 13 July 1915.  When A/81 was transferred to 118 (Howitzer) Bde to become the new C/118, Roberts may have been one of those transferred.  He was appointed a temporary Capt on 23 Jun 1916.  On 16 Jul 1916, he was posted from 118 (Howitzer) Bde into 58 Bde when A/118 was transferred to become the new D/58 and Roberts was appointed the battery commander of D/58.  He was sent on a gunnery course at the Overseas Artillery School in England on 9 Feb 1917 and was appointed to take charge of the brigade’s baggage wagons on 13 Apr 1917 ahead of a 3-day march.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 18 Apr 1917, the citation saying that it was awarded “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried out a daring reconnaissance under very heavy fire and brought back most valuable information. He has on many previous occasions done fine work.”  However, he was not with the battery when the award was made: he had been severely wounded two days earlier.  He had been trying to get a gun out of a shell hole on 16 Apr 1917 when an enemy shell exploded nearby, and the shrapnel caused a compound fracture of the bones in his left leg and foot.  He was admitted to 3 Australian Field Ambulance the same day where his left leg was immediately amputated below the knee.  He was then transferred to No.8 General Hospital in Rouen and from there was evacuated back to the UK on Hospital Ship “Panama” which sailed from Le Havre on 13 May 1917, arriving in Southampton the following day.  A Medical Board held at Caxton Hall on 31 May 1917 anticipated that he would be incapacitated for four and a half months from the time of his injury.   He was fitted with an artificial limb and on 22 Jun 1917 was transferred to the Red Cross Hospital for Officers in Brighton.  His sick leave, which had started on 13 May 1917, was extended for a further 2 months on 2 Aug 1918 in the hope that he might then be fit for clerical work.  While on leave, the Ministry of Labour was keen to employ him in the Officers’ University and Technical Classes, though it is not clear if he ever took up such a position.  A Medical Board was held on 16 Oct 1918 which declared him fit (category Cii) so that he could take up clerical duties.  While recuperating he kept in touch with many of the officers and men of the brigade, a practice that he clearly continued after the war, often for example, turning up to the divisional reunions.  He retired from the Army on 3 Jan 1919 due to his wounds.  After the war he worked for 22 years as the transport manager to Hovis Ltd, before moving to Transport Services Ltd as their chief engineer.  He was appointed divisional stores officer for British Road Services in 1949, and on his retirement became associated with the Aero Motor Spirit Co. Ltd.  He was a founder and council member of the Institute of Road Transport Engineers and a member of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers.  Carlton Roberts died on 30 Jun 1958 in Worthing, Sussex, aged 68.  He was clearly highly thought of, for example when Capt Hutton joined A/58 as the new battery commander in late July 1916, he praised Roberts as a “good fellow” and Roberts is warmly portrayed by Richard Blaker as Capt ‘Dicky’ Richards – “a fine officer” – in his semi-autobiographical novel “Medal Without Bar”.  
Sgt.
Robinson
Reginald Harry
1281
B/58
Reginald Harry Robinson was the son of Harry and Emily Robinson and was born in about 1891.  They lived in Rothersthorpe, near Wootton, Northants.  In 1911 he was living in Earls Barton, near Northampton and was working as a manager of a coal merchant’s.  In 1914 he was working as an armature winder for The British Thomson-Houston Co in Rugby.   He enlisted into the RFA in Rugby on 2 Sep 1914, aged 24, and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there he was posted to 189 Battery on 11 Sep 1914, which became C/59.  He was appointed a paid A/Bdr on 14 Sep 1914, promoted to Bdr on 17 Oct 1914 and on 27 Feb 1915 he was posted to 59 Bde Ammunition Column (BAC) as an A/Cpl.  He sailed from Devonport on 2 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 15 Jul 1915.  He was appointed A/Sgt on 1 Jan 1916, was posted to A/59 on 9 May 1916 at Ballah and from there back to 59 BAC on 3 Jun 1916.  He sailed with the BAC from Alexandria on 27 Jun 1916, landing in Marseilles on 4 Jul 1916.  He was confirmed as a Sgt on 27 Jun 1916 and was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 20 Jul 16.  Then on 24 Apr 1917 he was posted to B/58.  He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK on 7 Nov 1917.  On 9 Apr 1918 he was one of several men in the brigade who were wounded in a gas attack.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance the same day and transferred to No.3 General Hospital at Le Tréport before being evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “Western Australia” on 10 May 1918.  He was admitted to the Lord Derby War Hospital in Warrington on 12 May 1918.  He would stay there for over 7 months, before being released on 31 Jan 1919.  He appeared to make a full recovery, though suffered from chest problems in later life.
Gnr.
Robinson
William
10712
D/58
William Robinson was born in about 1895 in Burbage parish, Leics, one of ten children of George Daniel and Mary Eliza Robinson.  In 1911 the family were living in Hinckley, Leics and William was working as a shoe hand, riveting shoes.  On 3 Sep 1914 he enlisted into the RFA in Nuneaton, aged 19.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 58 Bde Ammunition Column (58 BAC) on 13 Sep 1914.  Along with the rest of 58 BAC he transferred into the new D/58 on 20 Jan 1915.  He got into trouble twice in January 1915 while training at Leeds: on the 13th he missed the 10 p.m. tattoo roll call and on the 30th he was late for the 11.30 a.m. parade.  For the first offence he was confined to barracks for 2 days, for the latter he had all passes stopped for a fortnight.   He sailed with his battery from Devonport on 3 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  He left 58 Bde soon after, possibly due to getting sick because he left Gallipoli in September 1915, arriving back in Alexandria on 23 Sep 1915 and two months later was attached to 1/1st Notts RHA and proceeded to help guard the Western Frontier of Egypt on 26 Nov 1915.  At Matruh he was awarded 21 days’ Field Punishment No.2 for “using threatening language to a NCO” on 30 Mar 1916.  The following month he was posted to the Base Depot at Sidi Bishr on 15 Apr 1916 and from there to join 68 Bde RFA, part of 10th (Irish) Division at this time, at Salonika, so sailed from Alexandria for Salonika on 2 May 1916.  When the division was ordered from Salonika to join the Egypt Expeditionary Force in the autumn of 1917, William sailed from Salonika on 29 Aug 1917, disembarking at Alexandria on 5 Sep 1917 and was posted to No.2 Section, 10 Division Ammunition Column (DAC) on 25 Sep 1917.  He appears to have fallen sick because on 21 Nov 1917 he joined the Mustapha Base Depot from hospital.  He was posted to B/68 on probably 17 Feb 1918. and will have taken part in the Palestinian campaign.  He fell sick again, so was admitted to No.69 General Hospital, Alexandria on 30 Oct 1918 with an unknown fever (pyrexia of unknown origin).  He left the hospital and was posted to the Garrison Base Depot on 3 Jan 1919 and on 22 Jan 1919 was posted back to 10 DAC.  On 12 Jun 1919, he was posted back to the UK from Port Said for demobilisation and attended the Dispersal Centre in Ripon.  During his service he contracted malaria at some point – it is not clear which of his periods sick was attributable to that.  After the war he returned to live in Hinckley.
 
Robinson
   
A/58
A signaller called Robinson was serving in A/58 when he was wounded on about 26 Sep 1916 during the Battle of Thiepval.  
Lt.
Robinson    
William Kennedy
1341
B/58
William Kennedy Robinson was born in Bromyard, Herefordshire on 22 Aug 1892, the son of Wesleyan minister, William Ovington Robinson and Margaret H Robinson.  He enlisted into the RFA and served as a gunner before being commissioned in November 1915.  He served with 17 Division’s artillery and was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917 before being posted on 8 Oct 1917 to join 11 Division Ammunition Column (DAC), though the following day he was posted to 298 Bde RFA.  Just 3 days later he returned to 11 DAC and then on 21 Oct 1917 he was posted to 58 Bde RFA.  While serving in B/58, he went on leave on 16 Dec 1917 and was placed in command of 11 Division’s leave party for the journey back to the UK, returning from leave on 2 Jan 1918.  He was appointed A/Capt for the period 13 – 29 Apr 1918 and went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 5 Sep 1918, returning on 23 Sep 1918.  Four days before the Armistice he was wounded on 7 Nov 1918 though was not evacuated and remained at duty.  For his actions that day he was awarded the Military Cross, the citation reading: “For conspicuous gallantry and coolness under heavy shell fire on the 7th November, 1918, when his battery came into action within 700 yards of the enemy at Gussigny, and had to ford a wide river. Several teams were knocked out, and many casualties occurred. He displayed the greatest courage and skill in guiding teams on to the positions, and getting them away, and set a splendid example to all ranks until he was severely wounded.”  William Robinson relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920 and after the war went to live in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he worked in commerce.  He returned to the UK in 1936, having sailed from Rio, docking at London on 7 Apr 1936 and was planning to stay at the Grand Hotel in Harrogate.  In the following years he lived in Halton, near Leeds, Yorks, with his widowed father and his younger sister, Evelyn Blanche Robinson.  In 1939 he was working as a life insurance broker and was a member of the officers’ emergency reserve.  The following year William Kennedy Robinson MC (136007) was promoted to Lt in the Royal Artillery on 6 May 1940 and he continued serving in the Forces until at least 1948, by when he would have been at least 55 years old.  He died on 12 April 1967 at Castle Hill Hospital, Cottingham, Yorkshire.
Capt.
Roper
G F
n/a
A/Bde Cdr
Capt Roper issued march orders for 58 Bde on 27 Aug 1916.  A few months later he was acting as a battery commander in the brigade so was A/Maj Roper when he had 48 hours’ leave to Paris on 24 Nov 1916.  He was struck off the strength of the brigade on 6 Feb 1917 when he was transferred back to the UK.  
Gnr.
Rosier 
George
10603
D/58
The son of Edwin and Louisa Rosier, George Rosier was born on 28 Jan 1883 in Bridgwater, Somerset.  Like his father he worked as a labourer in a brickyard.  He married Bessie Russell in Bridgwater on Christmas Day, 1912 and they had at least three sons, William, Edwin and Bertie, born in 1913, 1915 and 1917 respectively and a daughter, Lorna, born in 1929.  He enlisted in Taunton on 30 Aug 1914, aged 28.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 58 Bde Ammunition Column (BAC) on 13 Sep 1914.  He transferred into D/58 when the BAC was converted into the new D/58 on 21 Sep 1915.  On 22 Jun 1915 he was posted back into the new 58 BAC.  He sailed from Devonport with the BAC on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 10 Aug 1915, disembarking at Mudros on 25 Aug 1915.  While at Mudros, he was admitted to hospital with dysentery on 22 Oct 1915, and was discharged to duty by 2 Australian Stationary Hospital on 16 Nov 1915.  He rejoined 58 Bde back in Egypt on 18 Jan 1916 but a few days later was found drunk in town on 29 Jan 1916 so was awarded 10 days’ Field Punishment No.2.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 20 Jul 1916 and was granted leave to the UK between 12 and 27 Dec 1916.  He was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance with diarrhoea on 6 Mar 1917, but was discharged to duty again on 16 Mar 1917.  He was granted leave on 5 Nov 1917.  He fell sick and spent the night of 3-4  Feb 1918 in hospital.  He was back in the UK when the Armistice was declared, having been granted leave between 2 and 17 Nov 1918, though he did not rejoin his unit until the 21st.   He sailed from Dieppe back to the UK for demobilisation and went to the Dispersal Centre at Fovant on 3 Feb 1919; he was demobbed on 3 Mar 1919.  In 1939 he, Bessie and three of their children were living in Bridgwater where George was working as a tile maker in a brickyard.  He died in Bridgwater in 1958, aged 75. 
Gnr.
Rosling
Thomas 
201135
 
Thomas Rosling was born in London on 28 Apr 1891, the son of John Heffield Rosling and Harriet Rosling.  On 7 May 1894 he started school at Vauxhall Street School, Lambeth.  After leaving school he worked as a general labourer and on 8 Sep 1912 he married Matilda Ellen Thompson in St John’s Church, Newington.  He joined the Territorial Force with service number 3206.  He transferred to the regular Army under the new service number 201135 and was serving with 58 Bde RFA in the Ypres salient when he was wounded.  He was taken to No.4 Casualty Clearing Station at “Dozinghem” where he died of his wounds on 1 Oct 1917, aged 26.  He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
2/Lt.
Rowbotham
Robert Neville
n/a
D/58
Robert Neville Rowbotham was born on 17 Jan 1889 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.  He went to Mill Hill School, playing cricket for the school in 1906-07, and then studied at Jesus College Oxford where he was a member of the Officers’ Training Corps between 1908 and 1910.  He moved to Ceylon [Sri Lanka] to work as a planter and joined the Ceylon Planters Rifle Corps in 1914.  In December 1914 he applied for a commission and had his medical examination in Columbo.  He then sailed for the UK and went to Grantham, home of the newly established 11th (Northern) Division because he appears to have known some of the senior officers in the division, including Brigadier General R D Gubbins, who was the Commander Royal Artillery for the division.  Brigadier Gubbins instructed Rowbotham to join 58 Bde on 16 Feb 1915 pending his being gazetted as an officer in the RFA which took place a week later on the 23rd.  On 5 Jul 1915 he embarked on SS “Karroo” in Devonport with his battery, D/58, arriving in Alexandria on 17 Jul 1917.  He sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915.  On 17 Jan 1917, he arrived back in Alexandria after the brigade was evacuated from Gallipoli.  Along with the rest of D/58 he was posted on 26 Apr 1916 to form the new A Battery of the 11th Division Howitzer Bde (later restyled as A/133).  His new brigade sailed from Alexandria on 26 Jun 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 7 Jul 1916.  He rejoined 58 Bde on 29 Nov 16 when A/133 was split up and he joined B/58.  Soon after he was promoted to Lt and so on 25 Jan 1917 Lt Rowbotham was sent on a signalling course at 11 Division Signalling School at Yvrench.  Between 16 and 24 Mar 1917 he was attached to 11 Division Artillery HQ.  He was appointed A/Capt on 18 Mar 1917 while acting as second-in-command of B/58.  He had some leave, returning to B/58 on 27 May 1917.  On the evening of 2 Jul 1917, he had gone into the town of Bailleul with Lt Baldwin of A/58 for dinner when a bomb was dropped about 20 yards away, injuring them both.  Rowbotham was admitted to No.7 Stationary Hospital the following day with multiple shrapnel wounds to the right side of his body including to his face, and three days later was evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “St Denis” which sailed from Boulogne on 6 Jul 1917, arriving in Dover the same day.  After a period of recuperation, he was declared fit for Home Service and so served briefly with 67 Division Artillery in Canterbury.  A Medical Board was held in Canterbury on 29 Oct 1917 where he was declared fully fit and ordered to return to his unit.  He returned to 58 Bde from England on 3 Dec 1917 and was posted to be second-in-command of A/58.  He went on 14 days’ leave on 1 Mar 1918.  As the Allied advance began towards the end of the war, he formed part of a mobile battery on 26 Aug 1918 to help chase the enemy back.  After the Armistice he went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 15 Nov 1918, returning on 4 Dec 1918.  He was posted back to the UK for demobilisation on 3 Feb 1919, though it was not until 14 Jun 1919 that he attended the Officers’ Wing of the Repatriation Camp at Pirbright.  He returned to the Homadola Estate at Udugama and in 1921 joined the local branch of the Freemasons.  On 2 Sep 1924 in E St Paul, Manitoba, Canada he married Mary Elzina Montgomery, the daughter of Dr E W Montgomery.  He therefore became brother-in-law to Roland Bull who had married another of Dr Montgomery’s daughters.  Rowbotham and Bull had served together in D/58, then in A/133 and then again back in 58 Bde which might account for how Rowbotham met Mary.  By 1929 they had had a daughter, Pamela, who had been born in Sri Lanka and the three of them spent a few months in Canada, sailing from the UK on 31 May 1929 for Canada, returning to the UK from Montreal on 1 Nov 1929.  He sailed from Sri Lanka to Los Angeles, California arriving on 9 Nov 1931 and this may be when he decided to settle there.  He, Mary and Pamela were certainly living in California in 1940 and in 1942 they were living in San Dimas, California and he was working for his father-in-law, Dr Montgomery.  Rowbotham naturalised as a US citizen in 1950.  In May 1958 he and his wife Mary returned to the UK for about 4 months.  He applied to join the Officers Emergency reserve on 13 Feb 1939 and was due to be removed by January 1944 due to age.  He died in California in 1971.
Sgt.
Ruck
Charles Henry
68662
C/58
Charles Henry Ruck was born in 1889 in Camden Town, London, the son of Charles and Emily Ruck.  In 1911 he was working as a pawnbroker’s assistant but by 1914 he was working as a steward.  He was in Sydney, Australia in late 1914 when he decided to volunteer to join the British Army, so he sailed on the SS “Hororata”, arriving in London on 23 Dec 1914.  He enlisted into the RFA in London at Wood Green on 12 Jan 1915, aged 25.  He was posted initially to No 4 Depot at Woolwich and was then posted to join 4C Reserve Brigade at Weedon, Northants, where he was appointed A/Bdr on 19 Mar 1915 and was posted to 47 Reserve Battery on 27 Apr 1915.  He was promoted to Cpl on 14 May 1915 and to Sgt on 19 Aug 1915.  He left 47 Reserve Battery on 16 Nov 1915 when he was posted to 154 (Howitzer) Bde RFA, part of 36 (Ulster) Division.  Three days later he married Agnes Balderson on 19 Nov 1915.  He sailed with the brigade when they first went overseas, leaving from Southampton on 27 Nov 1915 and arriving in Le Havre the following day.  He attended a gunnery school for instruction between 16 Jan and 2 Feb 1916 and was attached to the School of Instruction on 1 Apr 1916 to learn about trench mortars.  Following that he was posted to 36Z Trench Battery on 6 Apr 1916 but was wounded on 27 Jun 1916 with a gunshot wound to his left shoulder.  He was admitted to No.10 General Hospital in Rouen on 30 Jun 1916 before being invalided back to the UK on Hospital Ship “St Patrick” on 2 Jul 1916, arriving in the UK the following day and was attached to 5C Reserve Bde.  He then joined 19th Reserve Battery, 4A Reserve Bde, but left them to return to France, arriving on 14 Oct 1916 and was posted to D/247.  He was transferred to 232 Bde RFA on 3 Jan 1917 probably initially joining D/232 before transferring to A/232 with whom he was appointed A/BSM on 30 Aug 1917 having already taken up the duties a fortnight earlier.  He attended 3rd Army Artillery School from 8 Jun 1917, rejoining his unit on 4 Jul 1917.  He was wounded for a second time by gunshot wounds to his left arm and right forearm and was admitted back into No.10 General Hospital in Rouen on 30 Nov 1917.  As a result, he reverted to his permanent rank of Sgt.  He was again evacuated back to the UK from that hospital on 3 Dec 1917 on the Hospital Ship “Carisbrooke Castle”.  He was admitted to hospital on 19 Feb 1918 and remained there for 58 days and so was posted for administrative purposes to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon on 20 Feb 1918.  He returned to France on 27 Apr 1918 and was posted from the Base Depot to C/58 on 9 May 1918, still with the rank of Sgt.  Three months later he left C/58 on 5 Aug 1918 to return to the UK as a candidate for a commission.  He was granted a fortnight’s leave and ordered to report to No.2B Bde RFA at Preston Barracks, Brighton, on 22 Aug 1918.  He planned to spend that leave with his wife in Weedon.  What happened next is a little unclear: although Preston Barracks, Brighton was home to No.4 Officer Cadet School, his record suggests that he actually attended No.2 RFA Officer Cadet School in Topsham Barracks, Exeter.  In any case, he did not receive a commission, though whether that was due to being unsuccessful in the course or because the Armistice was declared before he had completed it and so there was no further need for new officers, is unclear.  He left the Cadet School and was posted as a Sgt to 3A Reserve Bde at Larkhill on 5 Jan 1919 where he served in 15 Reserve Battery.  Probably while at the Cadet School he was twice admitted to hospital (No.4 Section) between 11 and 18 Oct 1918 and then between 29 Oct and 5 Nov 1918 with influenza.  He was sent for demobilisation to No.1 Dispersal Unit at Crystal Palace where he attended on 9 Feb 1919.  He considered being repatriated after the war back to Australia but in a letter of 28 Apr 1919 made clear that he had in fact decided to remain in the UK having been offered a job and so settled back into living in North Finchley, London. 
Gnr.
Russ
Ernest William
10586
C/58
Ernest William Russ was born in about 1884 in Milton Clevedon, Somerset, the son of Thomas G Russ and Sarah Eliza Hobbs (née Reakes).  In 1901 he was working as a groom and gardener and when he enlisted into the RFA in Taunton on 2 Sep 1914, he had been working as a labourer and believed he was aged 27 (though was probably 29 years old).    He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 14, which became C/58.  He had a bout of rheumatism which resulted in him staying in the Military Hospital in Leeds between 21 and 25 Jan 1915.   He sailed with 58 Bde from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He was admitted to 17 General Hospital in Alexandria on 12 Feb 1916 with diffuse alveolar haemorrhage and was evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “Dunluce Castle” which sailed from Alexandria on 23 Mar 1916, arriving back in the UK on about 4 Apr 1916.  That same day he was admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital, Southmead, Bristol and stayed there until 17 Apr 1916.  He was formally posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 5 Apr 1916, then to 4A Reserve Bde on 6 May 1916 before returning to France on 11 May 1916.  He was posted from No.2 Guards Base Depot to the Guards Division Ammunition Column on 1 Jun 1916 and was then posted to A/61 on 25 Aug 1916.  During a reorganisation he was posted to C/74 on 14 Nov 1916.  On 4 Apr 1917 he was ordered to “make good value 3s 9d 1f for losing by neglect 1 PH helmet value 2/6, 1 case waterproof wallet value 5d 3f, and 1 pair goggles, anti-gas value 9d 2f” which he had lost the previous day.  He developed an abscess on his back and was hospitalised with it from 27 Aug 1917 until he returned to duty on 16 Sep 1917.  He was then admitted to 3 Field Ambulance on 22 Sep 1917 with diarrhoea and then went to No.6 General Hospital in Rouen from which he was evacuated back to the UK on 17 Oct 1917 having now been diagnosed as suffering from colitis on the Hospital Ship “Western Australia” and was admitted to the Queen Mary’s Military Hospital, Whalley, Lancs, until he was discharged on 13 Nov 1917.  He was posted to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at Ripon on 11 Feb 1918 and then overstayed his embarkation leave by 24 hours between 10 p.m. on 27 Feb 1918 until 10 p.m. the following day so was docked 2 days’ pay.  After his leave, he returned to France on 6 Mar 1918 and was posted to 92 Battery, 17 Bde RFA on 17 Mar 1918.  He was appointed a Lance Bdr on 9 Aug 1918 but, at his own request, reverted to gunner on 29 Nov 1918.  He sailed from Antwerp on 29 May 1919 for demobilisation and went to No.1 Dispersal Centre at Fovant on 9 Jun 1919.  He returned to Milton Cleveland after the war and wrote to state that he believed there was some “special distinction” for those who were part of 2nd Army when it crossed the River Rhine.  
S/Smith
Ruttledge
A
   
Shoeing Smith A Ruttledge was found guilty of drunkenness and conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline at a Court Martial held at Hencourt on 26 Aug 1916 and was sentenced to 35 days’ Field Punishment No.1.
Sgt.
Sanders
Ernest James
25152
C/58
Ernest James Sanders was born in Seacombe, near Wallasey, Cheshire in 1892, the son of Henry Herbert Sanders and Annie Sanders (née Hughes).  He had 5 sisters and three brothers.  He enlisted into the RFA in Liverpool probably shortly after war was declared and may have served in 58 Bde for much, or even all, of his time in the Army.   Although he survived until after the Armistice, he was a patient in the Auxiliary Hospital in Orrell, near Wigan, where he died on 14 Feb 1919, aged 26.   He is buried in Wallasey (Rake Lane) Cemetery, Merseyside.  Two of his younger brothers were also killed in the war.
Gnr.
Saunders
Edmund Francis
92098
C/58
Edmund Francis Saunders was born in 1881 in Cuxham, Oxfordshire, the son of Francis and Ann Saunders.  In 1907 Edmund married Rose and two years later they had a son, also called Edmund.  In 1911, Edmund (senior) was working as a brewer’s drayman.  He enlisted first into the Army Veterinary Corps as a private with service number 14792 but transferred at some point to the RFA as a gunner with a new service number, 92098.  He was serving in C/58 when he and five others – Gnr Joseph Bell (74801), Gnr George Gay (141494), Sgt Albert Lamb (75120), Bdr James Reader (93050) and Gnr Harold Saunders (43356) – were killed in action on 25 Aug 1917.  He was 36 years old.  He is buried alongside them in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.  
Gnr.
Saunders
Harold
43356
C/58
Harold Saunders was born in Birkenhead on 9 Oct 1889, the son of Irving Steele Saunders and Mary Anne Saunders.  In 1911, he was working as a boilermaker in ship-repairing.  He enlisted in Birkenhead on 25 August 1914 into the Cheshire Regiment (with service number 11563).  He was posted to B company of the 8th (Service) battalion but was discharged as medically unfit on 13 Oct 1914 while at Draycott Camp, Swindon.  He apparently re-enlisted in July 1915 into the RFA with service number 43356 and was posted that October to the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.   He was serving in C/58 when he and five others – Gnr Joseph Bell (74801), Gnr George Gay (141494), Sgt Albert Lamb (75120), Bdr James Reader (93050) and Gnr Edmund Saunders (92098) – were killed in action on 25 Aug 1917.  He is buried alongside them in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.  He was described by an unnamed officer as “one of my most reliable gunners”.  
Gnr.
Savage
Leslie Thomas
935573
C/58
Leslie Thomas Savage was born in Highbury, London, in 1898, the son of Thomas Robert and Emily Savage.  On 27 Nov 1913 he was registered as a temporary boy clerk in the Civil Service.  He enlisted into the Territorial Force’s 3rd London Bde RFA in Leonard Street in Shoreditch, London.  He was 20 years old and serving in C/58 when he was killed in action on 20 Jun 1918.  Two other members of his battery were also killed that day, Dvr John Caton (229173) and Dvr Joseph Petty (152339).  The three of them are buried alongside each other in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France.
Gnr.
Scholey
John 
233230
C/58
John Scholey was one of 11 children of Robert and Emily Scholey.  He was born on 1 Apr 1890 in Wortley, near Leeds, Yorks and was baptised on 8 Jun 1890.   In 1911 he was working on his father’s farm, Bank End Farm, in Wortley.   Between 1911 and 1915 he married Sophia and they had one child.  He enlisted on 11 Dec 1915 in Sheffield aged 25, but was not mobilised until 22 May 1917.  After mobilisation, he was posted initially to the RFA’s No.1 Depot in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and from there to 4B Reserve Bde on 2 Jun 1917.  He was then posted to the Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery Central Signalling depot at Swanage on 8 Dec 1917, leaving there on 16 Jan 1918.  He was late returning from his pre-deployment leave in January 1918 so was confined to barracks for 3 days and lost 2 days’ pay.  He was serving in C/58 when he was discharged as medically unfit due to sickness from the Military Heart Hospital, Sobraon Barracks, Colchester on 29 May 1918.  As a result, he was awarded a weekly pension for a year after being discharged and his address at the time was given as Warren Lane, Chapeltown, Sheffield.  Twenty years later he re-enlisted into the Royal Artillery (Territorial Army) on 7 Mar 1939, but his application was not finally approved under paragraph 17 of the Territorial Army regulations on about 10 May 1939 and so he was discharged.  Later that year, he, Sophia and their daughter were living in Wortley, where John worked as a blacksmith.  John Scholey died in 1948 in Wortley, aged 58.
Maj.
Sedgwick
F R
 
A/58
Maj F R Sedgwick, Reserve of Officers, joined and was posted to 184 Battery on 9 Sep 14.
Sgt.
Seed
William
675036
B/58
Sgt William Seed joined B/58 on 3 Jun 1918 on appointment to be their new acting Battery Quartermaster Sergeant.  He had previously been serving in A/275, part of 1/1 West Lancs Bde RFA in 55 Division, but joined 58 Bde to take over as the BQMS of B/58 to replace BQMS Robert Eadie (715419).  Eadie had moved that same day to be the BQMS of C/58 to replace Harold Single who was being demoted for inefficiency.  
Dvr.
Sellick
Leslie
11058
 
Leslie Sellick was born in 1896 in Bristol, the son of Arthur Henry and Mary Ann Sellick.  Although he was registered at birth as Harry Leslie Sellick, and was sometimes also called Henry Leslie Sellick, he appears to have been known as Leslie.  In 1911 he was 14 years old, living in Brislington, Bristol, and was working as a clerk.  He enlisted early in the war and joined the RFA.  He went overseas, probably with 58 Bde, arriving in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915.  He served throughout the war and was discharged from the Army on 20 Mar 1919 due to suffering from malaria and returned to live in Bristol.  On 11 Aug 1923 he appears to have emigrated to Canada on the SS “Pittsburgh”, sailing from Southampton bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  He gave his profession as plumber.  
A/Bdr.
Semple  
Richard
93493
B/58
Born in 1894, in Burnbank, Lanarkshire, Richard Semple was the son of Matthew and Mary Semple.  Before he enlisted into the Army on 27 Aug 1914 in Hamilton, Lanarkshire and joined the RFA, he had been working as an electrician in a colliery.  He was posted initially to No 6 depot in Glasgow and from there as a driver to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914.  A few days later while training in Leeds he missed a parade on 21 Sep 1914 and so was confined to barracks for 7 days.  After 185 Battery had been renumbered as B/58, Richard was appointed an unpaid A/Bdr on 18 May 1915.  He was posted overseas, arriving in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915 and probably served at Gallipoli.  The following year he was absent from the 10.30 a.m. parade while at Zahrieh, Egypt on 13 Feb 1916 and so was awarded 5 days’ Field Punishment No 2.  Three months later he was in trouble again, having gone out of camp after lights out on 6 Jun 1916 at el Ferdan, so was confined to camp for 6 days.  After travelling to France, he was appointed A/Bdr on 2 Sep 1916.  He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery on 22 Dec 1916, the award being gazetted on 19 Feb 1917.  Along with at least 6 other members of the brigade he was sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917 and he passed as a 1st class signaller by XIII Corps school on 22 Mar 1917, having been formally promoted to Bdr on 7 Mar 1917.  On 13 Oct 1917 while the brigade was taking part in the 3rd Battle of Ypres, he was gassed with mustard gas.  Although the effects were described as “mild” they were enough to have him admitted to No.2 Canadian General Hospital in Le Tréport on 15 Oct 1917 from where he was evacuated back to the UK on 23 Oct 1917.  After recuperating he was posted to the Clearing Office at the Royal Artillery and Tank Corps Command Depot at Hipswell, Catterick on 2 Jan 1918.  While there, he was admonished for again being absent from parade, this time on 5 Feb 1918.  He was posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 1 Mar 1918, serving in 60th Reserve Battery in Lessness Park Camp, Abbey Wood.  From there he went to 5C Signalling Training Centre on 6 Apr 1918 and was appointed a Signaller Bdr on 16 Jul 1918.  In October 1918 he was serving at the RH and RFA Signalling Training Centre in Crowborough when his Military Medal was sent to him and it may have been formally presented to him by the commandant of the centre.  He was serving in 56th Reserve Battery when he was discharged due to sickness from his gassing on 6 Jan 1919 after attending a dispersal centre in Surbiton, and his character was described as “very good”.  After being discharged he was awarded a pension of 6s a week for the following 91 weeks due to 1% disability from the gassing.
BQMS
Sewell   
James L
40995
A/58
James L Sewell from Twickenham was serving as the BQMS of A/58 when he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for devotion, the award being gazetted on 17 Jun 1918.  This may be James Lewis Sewell who was born on 12 Jan 1888 in Portsmouth, the son of Henry (sometimes referred to as Harry) Sewell and Maria M F Sewell.  James Lewis Sewell joined the RFA and was serving at the Deepcut Barracks in 1911 and 1912.  On 28 Aug 1912, he was aged 25 and serving as a Bdr when he married a widow, Edith Barbara Carlton Walker, in the parish church, Aldershot.  In 1922 he was still in the RFA and was serving as a Sgt Major.
Gnr.
Shackleton
Bernard
116166
 
Bernard Shackleton was born on 3 Jan 1896 in Rochdale, the son of John and Elizabeth Ann Shackleton.  On 22 Jan 1912 he followed his father into the drapery business when he was apprenticed out for 3½ years to Stretch & Harlocks Drapers Store in Nantwich, Cheshire.  He enlisted into the Army and joined the RFA as a gunner.  He was posted to France, arriving on about 3 Jul 1916.  At some point he was then posted to 58 Bde and was serving in the brigade during the Battle of Messines in June 1917.  He was wounded and left the brigade on 17 Jul 1917.  He was evacuated back to the UK to recuperate, spending time in Lees Court Military Hospital, Sheldwich, near Faversham, Kent.  He was awarded a wound stripe on 13 Aug 1917.  His fiancée, Constance Jane Jackson, known as Connie, travelled from her home in Nantwich to Lees Court where they were married on 15 Aug 1917.  Bernard transferred from the RFA into the Military Mounted Police (MMP) where he was assigned the new service number P/17473 and he returned to active service on 10 Mar 1918.  He served in the MMP including as part of the British Army on the Rhine after the Armistice until he was discharged on 14 Jan 1920, by which point he was acting as a Cpl.  He and Connie set up home in Connie’s home in Nantwich, the Rifleman Inn, from which Bernard ran a draper’s business.  They stayed in Nantwich and in 1939 was serving as an ARP Warden while Connie worked as a draper. Bernard also served in the Nantwich Home Guard during the war and he and Connie moved to live in Tollgate House, Audlem Rd, Nantwich in 1944.  After the war, Bernard continued to operate a draper’s business and also ran a riding stables.  He enjoyed the good life – nice cars, large cigars – and going to the races throughout the UK.  He died suddenly in Barony Hospital, Nantwich on 6 Jul 1960.
Gnr.
Shacklock
Fred
152022
 
Fred Shacklock was born on 23 Jul 1897 in Caistor, Lincs the eldest son of Joseph and Sarah Jane Shacklock.  In 1911 he was an apprentice general joiner.  He enlisted into the Army on 10 Dec 1915 and joined the RFA.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 29 Oct 1918 as being no longer fit for active service due to wounds he had received.  He returned to live in Caistor and subsequently married Elsie Queenie Brighton in 1926.  In 1939 he was working as a haulage contractor.  He died in Caistor on 27 Feb 1948, aged 52.  
Sgt.
Shannon
   
C/58
Sgt Shannon was posted to 58 Bde on 5 Dec 1917 and joined C/58, having been posted there from 46 Division’s Artillery.
Bdr.
Shelton
Alexander Reuben
208003
A/58
Alexander Reuben Shelton was born in Fulham, Middx in 1883, the son of Harry Thomas and Matilda Shelton.  Some records suggest that he enlisted into the Dragoons of the Line in 1899, claiming to be 18, and served for 12 years with 4th Dragoon Guards.  However, when he married Alice Lucy Davey on 29 Jul 1906 in Putney Church, his marriage certificate records that Alexander was working as a groom at the time.   In 1911 he was working as a carman for a wholesale newsagents, and he and Alice had two children, Patricia and Ronald.  He enlisted in Wandsworth and joined the RFA.  He was serving as a Bdr in A/58 when he was wounded under heavy shell fire on 9 Mar 17.  He was taken to 18th Casualty Clearing Station at Lapugnoy near Béthune, France, where he died the following day, aged 34.  He is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetery and was described as a “devoted husband, father and son, loved by all, forgotten by none”. 
Gnr.
Shelton
Robert
20393
C/58
Born in about 1895 in Radford, Nottingham, Robert Shelton was the eldest of the 4 children of Robert and Mary Ann Shelton.  In 1901 he and his family were living in Wollaton, Nottingham, and ten years later in 1911 he was working as a dairyman, aged 15.  He enlisted early after war was declared and went overseas with the RFA to Egypt, arriving on about 19 Jul 1915.  He was serving in C/58 when he was killed in action, aged 22, on 30 Aug 1917.  He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.  
Gnr.
Sheppard
Thomas
135349
B/58
Thomas Sheppard was born in about 1890 in Box, Wilts.  He was the eldest son of Frederick George and Anne Elizabeth Sheppard.  Tom, as he appears to have been known, followed his father and became a stonemason.  On 16 Feb 1915, Tom married Gladys Annetta Lilly in Neston, Wilts.  He enlisted in Corsham and joined the RFA.  He was serving with B/58 when he was killed in action on 2 Aug 1917, aged 27.  He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, at Ypres.
Gnr.
Sheppard
William Henry
92537
D/58
William Henry Sheppard was the son of Mr and Mrs W H Sheppard.  He grew up in Bristol and enlisted into the Army there, joining the RFA.  He was serving in D/58 when he died on 23 Nov 1916 from wounds he had received and is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension, France.  He was “Sadly missed by Mother & Dad & sisters, also Maud, Will & Ronald”.
Sgt.
Sherman
Francis Cornelius
3479
C/58
Francis Cornelius Sherman, known as Frank, was born in Walthamstow, Essex in 1879, the son of James and Eliza Sherman.  He was working as a carman when he joined the Army in 1897, aged 18, and in 1911 was serving as a Cpl in 83rd Battery RFA in India.  He was still a Cpl when he went to Egypt, arriving on about 19 Jul 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was replaced as a Cpl by Harry Wheeler (99250) on 8 Apr 1917.  This was probably when he was promoted to Sgt.  The following month he was court-martialled in the field on 6 May 1917.   On 3 Oct 1918 he set off to go on a veterinary course when he was killed in action en route.  He is buried in Sains-Les-Marquion British Cemetery, France, leaving a widow, Rose.  
Saddler
Shute
Arthur George
L/4744
HQ
Saddler Shute was transferred from the HQ of 58 Bde to 55 Division Ammunition Column on 7 May 1918 because he was surplus to the establishment.  This was probably Saddler (later Cpl) Arthur George Shute, L/4744, who had first arrived in France on about 26 Nov 1915.
L/Bdr.
Sigsworth
Edward Thomas
71522
D/58
Edward Thomas Sigsworth was born in York in about 1894, the eldest son of John George and Sarah Ann Sigsworth (née Linley).  He followed his father, a railway porter, into working for North Eastern Railway and was working for them as a greaser in 1911, aged 17.   In October 1918 he was serving in D/58 as a L/Bdr when the Absent Voters List for York was compiled.   He probably married Louisa Brierley in 1920 and died in York in 1966.  
S/Smith
Simmonds
Frank
99106
 
Frank Simmonds was absent from his home in Southwark and serving with 58 Bde so was entitled to a vote by proxy in elections.  
Bdr.
Simpkins
Tom
98043
D/58
Tom Simpkins was born in Wootton Bassett, Wilts.  He enlisted in Swindon probably early in the war.  He went to France on about 22 Jul 1915 and was serving in D/58 when he died of wounds in No.4 General Hospital, Camiers on 5 Mar 1917.  He is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France.
BQMS
Single
Harold
62203
C/58
Harold Single was serving in D/58 when he was transferred to C/58 on 27 Nov 1917 to replace BQMS Bull who was promoted that day to be the brigade’s RSM.  A few months later, however, Harold Single was demoted for inefficiency to Sgt on 3 Jun 1918 and so was in turn replaced as BQMS for C/58 by Robert Eadie (715419).  In October 1918, he was registered as an absent voter for St Albans to enable him to vote by proxy or by post, at which point he appears to have been serving in 11 Division Ammunition Column.
Capt.
Skey
Arthur James
n/a
A/58
Arthur James Skey was born on 9 May 1886 in Kilburn, London, the son of Arthur and Edith Amy Skey.  In 1891 the family were living in Chalfont St. Giles, Bucks, and in 1901 were in Amersham, Bucks where the 14-year old Arthur James Skey was working as a printer’s apprentice.  Later, he acted as assistant to Harold H Child, then editor of the literary periodical, “The Academy”, before taking over as editor when Child retired.  He was living at Grange House, Cuffesgrange, County Kilkenny when he joined 2nd King Edward’s Horse as a trooper on 25 Aug 1914 with service number 232 and was then based at Hounslow Barracks.  On 21 Nov 1914 he applied for a commission hoping to join the cavalry or the RFA and was commissioned into the RFA as a temporary 2/Lt on 17 Dec 1914.  He was posted to C/60 Bde RFA and sailed from Devonport on 4 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 19 Jul 1915.  He spent 16-30 Aug 1915 in hospital in Port Said before sailing from Alexandria on 18 Oct 1915, disembarking at Suvla Bay on 25 Oct 1915.  When British forces withdrew from Gallipoli, he re-embarked at Suvla Bay on 18 Dec 1915, arriving back in Alexandria on 22 Dec 1915.  He was granted temporary rank of Lt on 25 Feb 1916, though this does not appear to have been officially confirmed until 4 May 1916.  When the brigade moved to France, he sailed with them from Alexandria on 2 Jul 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 10 Jul 1916.  A few days later he was posted as an instructor at the Trench Mortar School on 16 Jul 1916 and was therefore appointed A/Capt the following day.  In his role which he described as being the Divisional Officer Trench Mortars he attended a demonstration of Toby Mortars on 31 Jul 1916 during which 2/Lt Atwill of X/11 Trench Mortar Battery was slightly wounded and so gave evidence at the subsequent enquiry.  He was awarded the Military Cross (MC) in the New Year’s Honours of 1917 and was appointed Staff Capt for 11 Division Artillery on 25 Jan 1917, replacing Capt A F B Cottrell.  He was attached to A/58 on 21 Jun 1917 and formally left the post of Staff Capt on 23 Jul 1917 when he was posted to join A/58 at which point he was replaced as Staff Capt by Lt H L Farrar.  He was posted for a month to 59 Bde RFA, serving with them between 28 Jul and 21 Aug 1917, after which he returned to A/58 to learn how to be a battery commander.  On 5 Sep 1917 he was appointed an A/Maj since he was now in command of A/58, a 6-gun battery, and was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 10 Sep 1917.  While he was on leave, he was appointed T/Capt on 18 Sep 1917 (though was still an A/Maj).  Shortly after his return he was slightly wounded on 27 Sep 1917 but was able to remain at duty.  He returned to the UK to attend the Overseas Artillery Course on 23 Nov 1917, rejoining his battery on 8 Jan 1918.  Along with many other members of the brigade he was gassed on 9 Apr 1918 and retired to the wagon lines.  Although he returned to duty two days later, on 11 Apr 1918, he appears not to have been fit because three days after that, on 14 Apr 1918 he was admitted to 1 Corps Officers’ Rest Station with debility, rejoining his unit on 2 May 1918.  When 58 Bde held a Horse Show on Sunday 23 Jun 1918, Maj Skey acted as the “Hon. Secretary, Stakeholder and Clerk of the Course.  The following month he stood in for the 11 Divisional Artillery Brigade Major when that officer went on leave on 23 Jul 1918.  As the Germans started falling back and mobile warfare started again, Maj Skey was detached from 58 Bde to command a mobile battery comprising four 18pdrs of A/58 and 2 howitzers of D/58 on 26 Aug 1918.  The guns would be pulled by mobile traction, rather than by horses and the battery, designated “A” Mobile Battery was attached to the Cavalry Corps.  He returned to 58 Bde on 26 Oct 1918, and was awarded a bar to his MC “For conspicuous gallantry and determination during operations from 4th to 11th November, 1918, at Estinne. He handled his battery with great courage and skill, keeping up with the advancing infantry, and constantly going forward to obtain information under heavy machine-gun fire”.  The day after the Armistice was posted from the brigade on 12 Nov 1918 to join 8 Division Artillery on 15 Nov 1918 to command 1/45 Bde RFA.  He was granted leave to the UK between 2 and 16 Jan 1919 and in March 1919 he was instructed to return to the UK and report to SD 4 in Room 270 at the War Office because he was required for duty in Russia.  The London Gazette reported that he relinquished the acting rank of Maj on 29 Mar 19 presumably because that was when he ceased to command 1/45 Bde and was posted to Russia.  This caused him subsequent difficulties because he joined the ill-fated Northern Russian Intervention at Murmansk on the understanding that he would still do so as a Major.  There he formed and acted as Commandant of a new White Russian Artillery School where he trained, equipped and put into action five White Russian artillery batteries.  After the British withdrawal from Murmansk that autumn, he went to the Officers’ Dispersal Unit in London on 28 Nov 1919 for demobilisation.  He then found it difficult to find employment and so wrote to the War Office on 9 Nov 1921 believing there to be opportunities to re-enlist and serve in the Tank Corps in Egypt, but the rumour turned out not to be true: the War Office had no such plans.  Instead, he set up a school, Southminster Grammar School in Southminster, Essex, and on 1 Feb 1922 was successful in his application to join the Reserve of Officers.  Arthur Skey married three times: on 8 Dec 1905 he married Elizabeth Rutherford Riddell in the Presbyterian Church on Highgate Hill in London; in 1925 he married Margaret Beatrice Marion Dewhurst in St George’s Church, Hanover Square, London and they had a son, Giles Skey Brindley, born on 30 Apr 1926 in Woking, Surrey; in about 1930 he abandoned his wife and son, and on 2 Feb 1933 he married Henrietta Maria Lilian Shaw.  Arthur Skey died 3 years later on 12 Feb 1936, aged 49. 
2/Lt.
Skinner
Frederick George
 
D/58
Frederick George Skinner was born on 4 Apr 1879 in Battersea, London, probably the son of William H and Mary A Skinner.  He was a regular soldier and was serving as a Sgt with 144 Battery RFA in Aldershot in 1911.  On 16 Aug 1914 he went to France as part of the BEF while serving in 39 Bde RFA as a BSM (service number 21528).  On 31 Oct 1916 A/Sgt Maj Skinner was commissioned as a 2/Lt for services in the field.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) and from there was posted to join D/58 on 20 Dec 1916.  Not long after, he returned to 11 DAC on 7 Jan 1917 and was admitted to hospital on 13 Jan 1917.  He was promoted to Lt on 1 May 1918 and five days later on 6 May 1918 he relinquished the acting rank of Capt.  After the Armistice and while 11 DAC was at Rouvignies, he was posted to No.4 “Z” Horse Depot, Rouen on his 40th birthday, 4 Apr 1919.  He retired from the Army on 3 Feb 1920.
Dvr.
Skinner   
Dominic Logan
93036
C/58
Born in Kirkcaldy, Fife in about 1887, Dominic Logan Skinner was the son of Joseph Logan Skinner and Euphemia Skinner (née Stubbles).  He was appointed a temporary assistant postman in October 1903 and on 14 Jun 1907 he married Minnie Cameron McDowall in Pathhead, Kirkcaldy.  By 1914 they had had three children, Helen Cameron Skinner (born 1907), Euphemia Stubbles Skinner (born 1910) and Joseph Logan Skinner (born 1914).  Dominic enlisted in Kirkcaldy on 26 Aug 1914 and was posted initially as a driver to C/58.  He was appointed an A/Sgt on 8 May 1916 but reverted to Cpl on 24 Jun 1916.  He was again appointed A/Sgt on 10 Jul 1917 and was confirmed in rank 10 days later.  He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field on 25 Sep 1917.  He was wounded twice in 1917, the second of which occurred on 18 Nov 1917.  He was posted to a depot on 17 Apr 1918 and was in 4th Battery, 1B Reserve Battery just before being discharged on 17 Oct 1918 because he was deemed unfit any longer for military service due to deafness in his right ear as well as gunshot wounds in his head, right groin and left arm.  After the war he returned to Kirkcaldy and returned to his job as a postman.
Gnr.
Smith
Cyril Percy
11265
C/58
Cyril Percy Smith was born in 1892 in Walsgave-on-Sowe, near Coventry, the son of William Henry Smith and Elizabeth Smith.  In 1911 he was working as a coal miner and was living with his family in Foleshill, Coventry.  He was still employed as a coal miner when he enlisted into the RFA in Warwick on 2 Sep 1914, aged 22.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to C/58 on 10 Sep 1914.  While at Milford Camp, he overstayed his leave from 12pm on 2 May until 11pm on 3 May 1915, so was confined to barracks for 7 days by Lt E J Franklin and was docked 1 day’s pay.  He sailed from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, disembarking at Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915.  Two months later he had pyrexia so was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance on 9 Oct 1915 and was discharged on 15 Oct 1915 but only to limited duties.  After the brigade re-deployed to France and Flanders, he was wounded by gas on 23 Sep 1917 and sent to No.1/2 Highland Field Ambulance.  He was transferred to No.8 British Red Cross Hospital at Le Touquet Paris-Plage on 25 Sep 1917 and then evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “Jan Breydel” on 17 Oct 1917.  When he got back to the UK, he was admitted to No.17 Canadian General (Ontario) Hospital, Orpington, Kent on 18 Oct 1917.  When he was discharged, he was granted furlough between 6 and 16 Nov 1917 before being posted to Irish Command Depot, Tipperary on 20 Nov 1917 to recuperate.  On 5 Feb 1918 he was posted to 60th (Reserve) Battery and then on 12 Mar 1918 to 50th (Reserve) Battery.  A few days later, on 16 Mar 1918, he was posted to the Signalling Training Centre before being posted back to France on 22 Apr 1918.  He reported to the Base Depot and was assigned to A/147 RFA on 2 May 1918.  Shortly after the Armistice he was admitted to 57 Casualty Clearing Station with influenza on 22 Nov 1918.  He was demobbed from No.2 Dispersal Unit Chiseldon on about 28 Jan 1919 and returned to live in Bedworth, near Nuneaton, Warks.  He married Florence Hadley (known as Florrie) in 1919.  Cyril Smith died in Nuneaton in 1968, aged 75.
Lt.
Smith
J
   
Lt J Smith was serving in 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) when he was attached to 58 Bde RFA on 21 Oct 1917.  He stayed with the brigade until 14 Feb 1918 when he returned to 11 DAC before going off to join 59 Division on 23 Mar 1918.  
Gnr.
Smith
Matthias
159832
 
Matthias Smith enlisted into the RFA on 11 Nov 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 1 Nov 1917 due to wounds he had previously suffered and so was awarded a Silver War Badge.
Dvr.
Smith
Samuel Appleton
895924
D/58
Samuel Appleton Smith was born in about 1881 in Horncastle, Lincs.  He was brought up by his single-parent mother, Elizabeth Ann Smith and by his grandmother, Ann Smith.  In 1911 he was living with his mother and his son, Cyril Watson Smith, and he was working as a poultry dealer.  The following year he married Lily Holmes on 15 Dec 1912 in South Willingham, Lincs, and they had a daughter the following year.  He joined the RFA Territorial Force and possibly served initially in 69 (2nd East Anglian) Division.  He was serving in D/58 on 23 Aug 1918 and was working to help get a wagon out of a ditch when an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on the party seeking to get the wagon out.  Samuel and eight others were killed, with another soldier later dying of wounds.  Samuel was 37 years old and is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Gnr.
Smith
   
C/58
Gnr Smith was serving in C/58 when he was passed as a 1st class signaller by XIII Corps school on 22 Mar 1917.
Dvr.
Smith 
Bert
10636
C/58
Bert Smith was born in Chilvers Coton, near Nuneaton, Warks on 24 Jun 1894, the son of Abraham and Florence Smith. He was already working as a miner in 1911 and was living with his family in Stockingford, Nuneaton. He enlisted in Nuneaton on 31 Aug 1914, aged 20. He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 186 Battery on 10 Sep 1914 which was subsequently renamed as C/58. While at Milford Camp, he overstayed leave by 3 days between 24 and 27 May 1915 so Capt Franklin confined him to barracks for 7 days. He sailed with his battery to Egypt in July 1915 and was appointed an A/Bdr on 20 Feb 1917. On 25 Jun 1917 he was slightly wounded by a gunshot wound in his left foot and was admitted to No.18 General Hospital, Camiers. He was re-admitted to the same hospital on 7 Jul 1917 with a severe fever and was then sent to No.6 Convalescent Depot at Etaples on 18 Jul 1917. He was appointed A/Cpl on 29 Sep 1917 and was promoted to Cpl on 10 Oct 1917. The following year he was appointed a paid A/Sgt on 26 Sep 1918. After the Armistice he attended No.2 Dispersal Unit at Chiseldon on 1 Jan 1919 and was demobbed on 29 Jan 19, his character being described as “very good”. His mother accidentally burned his discharge papers in 1934. Bert married Violet Constance Bell in 1919 and they had at least eight children. He died in 1959, aged 64.
A/Bdr.
Smith   
Daniel
20401
 
Daniel Smith was born on 15 Apr 1888 in Newbottle, Durham, the son of William and Mary Ann Smith.  He was baptised just under two weeks later at St Michael’s, Houghton-le-Spring.  In 1911 he was working as a coal miner and living with his widowed mother and younger siblings.   He joined up and served in the RFA.  He was appointed an A/Bdr and was serving in 58 Bde when he was tried by Field General Court Martial in Egypt.  He was found guilty on 26 Jul 1915 of disobedience and sentenced to 6 months’ hard labour which was commuted to 84 days of Field Punishment No.2 and he also reverted to gunner.   He was awarded the Military Medal, which was gazetted on 12 Dec 1917.  He was serving in D/121 when he was killed in action aged 30 on 12 Sep 1918.  He is buried in Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt.  He left a widow, Margaret Smith, of 33 North View, Colliery Row, Fence Houses, Durham.
Gnr.
Smyth
William Darley
14154
D/58
William Darley Smyth was born in about 1895 in Old Harbour, Jamaica.  He was the son Mrs. Albertina. L. Smyth and had at least two siblings: Frederick and Madeline.  He went to France on about 11 Dec 1915 and served in 458 Battery, 118 Bde RFA.  He probably transferred to D/58 when that battery was reassigned to 58 Bde in July 1916.  On 2 or 3 Oct 1917, he was serving in D/58 in the Ypres salient when one of the gun pits received a direct hit from an enemy shell killing him and up to 6 others.  He died aged 22 and is buried alongside five of these comrades from D/58 in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium: Gnr Henry Batten (233475), Gnr Arthur Himsworth (117053), Bdr George Miller (82899), Gnr Lewis Wakelin (111325) and Cpl Alfred Wilcox (96541).
Dvr.
Soutar
George
192965
A/58
George Soutar was born in 1884 in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire.  He was the son of George and Christina Soutar and in 1901 was working as an apprentice blacksmith.  He had been working as a poulterer when he enlisted into the Army on 11 Feb 1916 in Dundee, aged 32, and after his medical examination he was classed as Aii.  He was serving with A/58 when the absent voters list for Dundee was compiled in the autumn of 1918 and his home address was given as 180 King St, Dundee.  He was discharged from the Army on 23 Oct 1919 due to being unfitted for duties.  This appears to have been caused by deterioration in his health: he spent 3 months in bed at the end of 1919 with exfoliative dermatitis.  A medical board of 18 Mar 1920 stated that he “complains of general weakness and some skin trouble.”  Their examination showed some slight evidence of scaly exfoliation in patches of general distribution, that his musculature was flabby and that he suffered from tremors in both his hands as well as some cyanosis [blue or purple discolouration].  The board decided that he was suffering from 15% debility that was attributable to his military service.  George would therefore presumably have been awarded a pension as a result.
Bdr.
Southey
   
B/58?
Bdr Southey reported that Gnr Ernest Ballard (10994) was missing from Chapeltown barracks on the evening of 1 Dec 1914, resulting in Ballard getting punished for his absence.  
A/Bdr.
Southway
Phillip Thomas
10654
B/58
Phillip Thomas Southway was born on 6 Nov 1890 in Bristol, the son of Charles J and Ellen Southway.  In 1911 Phillip was working as a dock labourer and when he enlisted three years later he was working as a sawyer.  He enlisted at Bristol Recruiting Office No.2 on 31 Aug 1914 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.   From there he was posted to 184 Battery on 10 Sep 1914 and he was appointed A/Bdr on 5 Nov 1914.  After 184 Battery had been renamed A/58 in January 1915, Phillip was posted to B/58 on 25 May 1915.  He embarked with his battery at Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, disembarking at Suvla Bay on 9 Aug 1915.  Four weeks later he was wounded for the first time – over the course of the war he would be wounded a total of 4 times.  On this first occasion he was wounded by shrapnel in his left shoulder on 7 Sep 1915, which resulted in him being evacuated to Malta on the Hospital Ship “Guildford Castle” on 9 Sep 1915 where he was admitted to St David’s Hospital, Malta on 12 Sep 1915.  He was transferred to the Convalescent Depot at Ghajn Tuffieha Camp, Malta on 21 Sep 1915, rejoining his unit on 16 Nov 1915.  He was promoted Bdr on 1 Dec 1915 to replace his fellow Bristolian, Bdr Sidney Lee (11239) who had been killed earlier that day.  After the brigade had left Gallipoli and Egypt and gone to France, Phillip was wounded on 4 Apr 1917 by a severe gunshot wound to his right arm.  He went to No.44 Field Ambulance and was then admitted No.13 General Hospital, Boulogne on 6 Apr 1917.  He was evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “St Denis” on 19 Apr 1917 and was posted to 5C Reserve Bde the same day.  On 17 Sep 1917 he went to the Clearing Office at the Royal Artillery Command Depot in the South Camp at Ripon.  A week later he was posted to 50 Reserve Battery on 26 Sep 1917 and then on 19 Jan 1918 he was posted to the Signalling Training Centre, Swanage.  He was then posted back to B/58 on 25 Mar 1918, but just two weeks later he was gassed on 9 Apr 1918.  He was admitted to 35 Field Ambulance the same day and then went to the Australian General Hospital in Le Tréport before being transferred on 16 Apr 1918 to No.3 General Hospital in the same town.  He was posted back to the Base on 20 May 1918 and from there to B/251 Bde RFA on 17 Jun 1918.  Three months later he was wounded with a mild gunshot wound to his right thigh and after initial treatment at No.30 Casualty Clearing Station he was admitted to No.4 General Hospital, Camiers on 29 Sep 1918 before being evacuated back to the UK where he was admitted to St John and St Elizabeth Hospital, Grove End Road, London.  He attended the Dispersal Hospital on Millbank in London on 11 Mar 1919 where he was described as sick and wounded.  He was demobbed on 8 Apr 1919.  He was awarded a pension of 9 shillings a week due to a 30% debility caused by the most recent injury to his thigh.  He had married Florence Emily Gregory on 6 Jun 1915, and they had set up home at 247 North St, Ashton Gate, Bristol; Phillip’s parents were just a few doors away at no.263.  In 1939 Phillip and Florence were living at 2 Hardy Ave, Bristol and Phillip was working as a petrol lorry driver at the time.  Phillip Southway died in 1980 in Weston-super-Mare aged 89.
Sgt.
Spittle
Wilfred Arnold
10595
B/58
Born on 3 Dec 1895 in Birmingham, Wilfred Arnold Spittle was the son of Arnold and Lousea Spittle.  In 1911 he was aged 15 and was working in the drapery business at home.   He enlisted into the RFA on 5 Sep 1914 in Birmingham and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea.  From there he was posted to 185 Battery, which became B/58.  He was appointed as A/Cpl on 13 Nov 1914 and three months later was promoted to Sgt on 11 Feb 1915.  The next day however, he was posted to C/55 RFA, in 10 (Irish) Division.  He was appointed A/BSM on 6 Aug 1917 though reverted to Sgt a few weeks later on 31 Aug 1917.  He was re-appointed A/BSM on 1 Oct 1917, reverting to Sgt again on 14 Aug 1918.  After the Armistice, he was posted to a dispersal centre on 3 Mar 1919 for demobilisation.  His subsequent claim for a pension due to neurasthenia was rejected since it was deemed not to have been attributable to his military service.  After the war he became a commercial traveller and on 22 Aug 1922 he married Doris Kathleen Jones in Christ Church, Sparkbrook, Birmingham.  By 1930 they had moved to live in London and in 1939 he and Doris were living in Harrow, Middx.  At that time Wilfred was working as a commercial traveller selling women’s clothes and was also working as a special constable in his spare time.  Doris passed away on 14 Nov 1954 in London and Wilfred died in London in 1970, aged 74.  
Gnr.
Spreadborough
Walter
10531
D/58
The eldest of the four children of Walter and Clara Spreadborough, Walter Spreadborough was born on 16 Dec 1892 in Woking, Surrey.  In 1901 the family was living in Reigate and in 1911 in Redhill where the 18-year old Walter was working as a mechanical engineer.  On 2 Sep 1914 he was still working as a mechanic when he enlisted into the RFA in Coventry aged 21.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea on 4 Sep 1914 and from there to 58 Bde Ammunition Column (58 Bde AC) on 13 Sep 1914.  Three months later while training in Leeds, he spent a week in the Military Hospital, Leeds between 16 and 23 Dec 1914 with whitlow (an abscess in the soft tissue near either a fingernail or toenail).  On 21 Jan 1915 he joined the new D/58.  He sailed with his battery from Devonport on 3 Jul 1915, arriving in Alexandria on 17 Jul 1915.  He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915 bound for Gallipoli.  A few weeks later he was admitted to hospital at Gallipoli on 30 Sep 1915 and was then evacuated back to Egypt where he was admitted to Kaser-El-Ani Hospital in Cairo on 10 Oct 1915.  After a stay there he was sent to the Convalescent Camp in Port Said on 31 Oct 1915 but he does not appear to have got fully better from whatever was ailing him since he was evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “Dover Castle” which left Alexandria on 24 Nov 1915.  Also on the “Dover Castle” for that voyage was another 58 Bde soldier, Dvr Henry Priddle (10569).  Walter did not serve overseas again, instead he was posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 6 Dec 1915 and to 1A Reserve Bde on 14 Apr 1916.  Soon after, he was released for munitions work at the Royal Aircraft Factory, South Farnborough on 11 Sep 1916 but only two weeks later was posted to No.3 Depot on 25 Sep 1916.  Shortly after the Armistice Walter was discharged from the Army on 14 Dec 1918 because he must have had a job to go to that was classed as essential to the country in the immediate post-war period and his address at the time was given as Bromyard, Herefordshire.  On 17 Apr 1919 he married Mary Josephine Reynolds in the parish church in Cove, near Farnborough.  Between at least 1933 and 1936 he and Mary lived in Battersea, London, before moving to Liverpool where in 1939 he and Mary were living with their 12-year old daughter, Josephine.  Walter was working as an engineer’s rate fixer at the time.  Walter stayed living in Liverpool until at least 1955. 
2/Lt.
Steel
 
n/a
B/58
2/Lt Steel was reported on 7 Oct 1915 as arriving at Suvla Bay to join B/58 as a reinforcement .  
Bdr.
Steel 
S
   
Bdr S Steel was found guilty by a Court Martial held on 30 Sep 1915 in Alexandria of breaking out of barracks, so was reduced to the ranks and awarded 7 days’ detention.  
Gnr.
Steele
Frederick H
10608
 
Frederick H Steele served in the RFA as a gunner and went overseas, arriving in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915.  He was serving in 58 Bde when he and at least 6 other members of the brigade were sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917.   He subsequently transferred to the Royal Engineers – something that happened to many signallers in the RFA – and he was given the new service number 360363.
Sgt.
Steele
Robert Jardine
93425
C/58
Robert Jardine Steele enlisted into the RFA on 25 Aug 1914.  On 26 May 1915 at Milford Camp he was serving as a Cpl in 58 Bde when he witnessed Dvr Francis Jones (11161) overstaying his leave by a couple of hours.  Shortly after this, he went overseas with the RFA when he went to Egypt arriving on about 12 Jul 1915.  He was serving as a Sgt in C/58 when he fell ill and so was replaced on 4 Dec 1915 by A/Sgt William Lewis (11163).  After redeploying to France, he was tried by Court Martial at Blangermont on 15 Jul 1916 which found him guilty of drunkenness and punished him by reducing him in rank to Bombardier.  He was probably still serving in C/58 when he was replaced as a Bdr by A/Bdr Harry Wheeler (99250) on 20 Feb 1917.  Two years later he was 27 years old and was serving as a Sgt in 103 Bde RFA when he was discharged from the Army on 8 Feb 1919, due to wounds he had received.  He was awarded a Silver War Badge and his address at the time was given as The Mount Lodge, Peebles.
S/Smith
Steer
Frederick
98034
C/58
Frederick Steer, known as Fred, was born in about 1878 in South Perrott, Dorset, the son of Edwin and Sarah Steer.  He came from a family of blacksmiths and so after working as a domestic servant on a farm he went into that trade.  After enlisting into the RFA he went overseas to France on about 14 Jul 1915.  He was serving as a shoeing smith in C/58 when he died of wounds on 9 Jun 1917 in No.1 Australian General Hospital in Rouen.  He is buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.
Gnr.
Steer
Noel
10731
185 Bty
Noel Steer was born in about 1893 in Brixham, Devon, the son of John and Sarah Steer. He was working as a groom when he enlisted in Exeter on 1 Sep 1914, aged 20. He joined the RFA and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea the following day. From there he was posted to 185 Battery. He spent 9 days in the Military Hospital Leeds between 18 and 27 Jan 15 with laryngitis. On 30 Apr 1915, he married Florence Louise Hayman in St Augustine’s church in Plymouth. For some reason he did not go overseas with the brigade in July 1915, instead on 3 Nov 1915 he was posted to 4A Reserve Bde and was then posted to the Expeditionary Force Base Depot in France on 13 Nov 1915. From there he was posted to join 24 Division Ammunition Column on 30 Nov 15 and in June 1916 joined the 24 Division’s Trench Mortar Battery. After the Armistice he was posted to the Dispersal Centre at Fovant on 13 Feb 1919 and was demobbed on 14 Mar 1919, his character being described as very good.
Sgt.
Stevens
   
D/58
A sergeant called Stevens appears to have served in D/58.
Cpl.
Stewart
   
A/58?
Along with Cpl Peter Wardlaw, a Cpl Stewart witnessed Dvr William Birch being absent without leave on 9-10 Jan 1915 while training at Chapeltown Barracks Leeds.
Gnr.
Still
James Edgar
92535
 
James Edgar Still was born in 1881 and came from Bedminster, Bristol. He enlisted into the RFA on 9 Nov 1915. He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 24 Jul 1918, aged 37, due to wounds he had received.
Gnr.
Stokes
William Cyril
129963
D/58
Born on 28 Feb 1895 in Nottingham, William Cyril Stokes was the son of William and Julia Stokes (née Jenkins). By 1911 he had followed his father into the Nottingham lace industry where he was dyeing and bleaching the lace. He married Maria Elizabeth Dowell in Nottingham in 1916 and they had a son born that year also called William Cyril Stokes. He was serving in D/58 on 23 Aug 1918 and was helping get a wagon out of a ditch when an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on him and his comrades, killing 9 of them including William with a further man later dying of wounds. William died aged 23, and is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Bdr.
Stratton
Thomas Bruce
80791
A/58
Thomas Bruce Stratton was born in Orral, Stirlingshire, the son of Alexander Stratton. Before the war he worked as a woodcutter and game-keeper for two years for a Mr Struthers before he enlisted on 10 Aug 1914 in Kirkcaldy. He was posted initially to No.6 Depot at Glasgow and from there to 184 Battery which subsequently was renamed A/58. On 4 Apr 1915 he missed roll-call until 10.45 p.m. while training at Leeds so was confined to barracks for 3 days. He went overseas, arriving in Egypt on about 17 Jul 1915. He was appointed an A/Bdr on possibly 22 Sep 1916 and was posted to Base on 8 Apr 1917, returning to A/58 a few weeks later. He was promoted to Bdr on 16 Sep 1917 but only a few weeks later was wounded in his left buttock by a shell fragment so was admitted to No.2 General Hospital, Wimereux on about 14 Oct 1917. His condition was serious and it wasn’t until 20 Oct 1917 that he was taken off the danger list. He was then evacuated back to the UK and was admitted to Toxteth Park Military Hospital, Liverpool. A Medical Board was held on 5 Jun 1918 at the 1st Western General Hospital, Fazakerley, Liverpool to confirm his discharge from the Army due to the wounds he had received, which also included an extensive abscess on his right hip. He was formally discharged on 26 Jun 1918 at which point he hoped to return to game-keeping and he was described as being of very good character. After the war he lived in Belvedere, Dunfield Road, Perth and appears to have married twice, to Jane Davidson with whom he had three children before her early death in 1922, and then to Catherine (sometimes spelled Katherine) Elizabeth Fisher. Between at least 1931 and 1960 he and Catherine lived in Forgandenny, Perth. Thomas died on 31 Mar 1982 in Perth Royal Infirmary and is buried in Forgandenny Churchyard, Perth and Kinross, alongside his second wife.
A/Bdr.
Sturt
Frederick James
2761
B/58
Frederick James Sturt was born on 25 Feb 1891 in Chobham, Surrey, the son of Sarah Louise Sturt who was unmarried at the time. His father was not recorded. He grew up living with his grandparents, James and Elizabeth Sturt in Burrowhill, near Chobham. In 1911 he was working as a golf caddy and by the time he enlisted into the RFA in Guildford on 31 Aug 1914 he had been working as a carman. He was posted initially to No.4 Depot at Woolwich and from there to 185 Battery the same day, which became B/58. While training at Leeds he was hospitalised in the Military Hospital, Leeds with a contusion to his leg between 16 and 22 Feb 1915. He was appointed an unpaid A/Bdr on 14 Apr 1915 and then a paid A/Bdr on 7 May 1915. He went overseas with the brigade, arriving in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915. He was promoted to temporary Bdr on 17 Sep 1915 thus making a vacancy which was filled by Thomas Nicholls (10621). While serving at Gallipoli, Frederick went sick with dysentery so was admitted to No.26 Casualty Clearing Station at Suvla Bay on 3 Nov 1915 and was then evacuated to Malta on HS “Maria” on 10 Nov 15. From there he was evacuated back to the UK and was admitted to 2nd Western General Hospital in Manchester on 29 Nov 1915. He therefore left 58 Bde and was assigned to 5C Reserve Bde. A year later he was examined by No.2 Travelling Medical Board at Hilly Fields, Brockley, SE London on 13 Nov 1916 and was classified as “B1”. He was therefore posted to the School of Instruction at Shoeburyness the same day though was again hospitalised two days later with influenza until 23 Nov 1916. At some point he transferred to the RGA and so was assigned a new service number of 149435. He was posted to the Anti Aircraft Depot on 5 May 1918, was appointed a paid A/Cpl on 8 Jul 1918 and then to paid A/Sgt on 22 Jul 1918. He was promoted to Sgt on 7 Oct 1918 and was posted the same day back to France to join 116 Anti-Aircraft Section. He was demobbed on 30 Mar 1919 at Dover and his character was described as very good. He went to live in West Wittering, near Chichester, Sussex. In 1921 he applied to join the RAF. In 1939 he was working as a gardener with his wife, Alice M Sturt. He probably died in 1953.
Bdr.
Sumner
Thomas Arthur
   
Thomas Arthur Sumner was born on 19 Oct 1883. He was from Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffs. He apparently served in 58 Bde during the Great War. After the war he moved to India where he joined the Indian police force and on 5 Sep 1923 he married Evelyn Maude Pereira in Madras, he was 39, she was 20.
Gnr.
Sutherland
James Bremner
10406
58 Bde AC
The son of Alexander and Margaret Sutherland (née Bremner), James Bremner Sutherland was born on 4 Dec 1890 in Wick, Caithness. Before the war he worked as a fishmonger and he enlisted into the RFA in Southampton on 1 Sep 1914, aged 23. He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 188 Battery on 11 Sep 1914, which became B/59. He was posted to 58 Bde Ammunition Column (AC) on 26 Jan 1915. Despite the Ammunition Column being left behind in the UK, he nevertheless sailed with the brigade from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915. He then sailed from Alexandria on 31 Jul 1915 for Gallipoli. While there he was admitted to hospital with dysentery on 18 Oct 1915 and was discharged back to duty four days later on the 22nd. He was posted to 58 Bde HQ on 17 Nov 1915 and then back to 58 Bde AC on 9 Dec 1915. After arriving back in Alexandria he was posted to B/58 on 28 Jan 1916. He was admitted to hospital with an undiagnosed condition on 10 Jul 1916 and was discharged the same day and sent to the Base. He was posted to join the 4th Section of 2 Division AC on 22 Aug 1916 and at some point thereafter joined 2 Division’s X Trench Mortar Battery. He applied for a commission and was due to report to 2B Bde in Brighton on 5 Feb 1918. He attended a course at No.3 RFA Officer Cadet School at Weedon but was released from the course on 23 Oct 1918 and was “relegated to the ranks as unlikely to make efficient Artillery Officer”. After the Armistice he was posted to No.1 Dispersal Centre at Kinross on 24 Feb 1919 which he attended three days later. After the war he returned to live in Wick and on 3 Dec 1924 he married Mary Brooks Innes and they had at least 2 sons. He died on 12 May 1974, aged 83.
Dvr.
Sutherland  
Robert
92248
A/58
Robert Sutherland was the son of George and Emma Sutherland. He was born in Liverpool on 29 May 1892. He worked as a labourer and then on 26 Aug 1914 he enlisted into the RFA in Liverpool, aged 22. He was posted to No.1 Depot at Preston and from there to A/66 Bde in 13 (Western) Division as a driver on 15 Sep 1914. On 16 Oct 1914 the City Electrical Engineer for Liverpool wrote to Robert via the War Office asking him to complete a certificate. Robert went overseas on 14 Jun 1915 to Egypt and – probably after service on Gallipoli – served at Salonika. He was posted to A/58 on 10 Apr 1916 and sailed with the brigade from Alexandria on 25 Jun 1916 bound for France. Over the course of his military service he got into trouble a few times and on 24 Feb 1917 he was found to be absent from camp between 0930 and 1030 so was awarded 4 days’ Field Punishment No.2 by his battery commander, Maj Hutton. On 20 Sep 1917 while serving with his battery in the Ypres salient, he was awarded the Military Medal (MM). The next year he was posted back to the UK arriving there on 14 Apr 1918 and he went to the Royal Artillery Camp Depot at Ripon. He was sent to the Dispersal Centre No.3 at Heaton Park in January 1919. On 16 Apr 1919 he wrote – according to him – for the third time requesting that his MM be sent to him. He said that he was going abroad shortly and wanted the medal to be sent to the Lord Mayor of Liverpool so that it could be presented to him. The medal was duly sent later that month. Later that year he married Edith Annie Parry and they subsequently moved to Wrexham. Robert died on 6 Jan 1955 in Wrexham. His medals came up for sale in 2014.
Far. Sgt.
Swan
David
56426
B/58
While serving in B/58, Farrier Sgt Swan was posted back to the UK on 13 Aug 1918 for a 6 month tour at home. This is most likely Farrier Sgt David Swan, service number 56426, who at the start of the war had served in 43 Bde RFA as a Shoeing Smith and who went to France with the British Expeditionary Force on 14 Aug 1914.
Gnr.
Tait
Alexander
93465
C/58
Alexander Tait was born in Dalry, Ayrshire in about 1892, the son of Alexander and Mary Tait. He probably enlisted shortly after the war was declared and was appointed a Shoeing Smith. He went overseas arriving in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915. He was reduced to Gunner by a Field General Court Martial on 10 Aug 1918 and he was killed in action serving in C/58 two weeks later. On the morning of 26 Sep 1918, C/58 was shelled in its wagon lines and suffered one man killed – presumably Alexander Tait – and three other men wounded. Alexander was 25 when he died and he is buried in Sun Quarry Cemetery, Chérisy, France. He left a widow, Jeanie.
Gnr.
Tait
John
144139
 
John Tait was born in about 1888. He enlisted into the RFA on 8 Aug 1916 and was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 7 Dec 1918 aged 30 due to wounds he had received.
Dvr.
Tavanyar  
Lionel Anthony Guy
98101
A/58
Lionel Anthony Guy Tavanyar was born in 1898 in Portsmouth, Hants, the son of actress Alma Victoria Tavanyar. He enlisted into the RFA and first went overseas to France on 30 May 1915. He was serving with A/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, the award being gazetted on 24 Jan 1919. After the war he married Amy B C White in Medway, Kent in 1925 though by the following year he was living in London apparently without Amy. In 1940 he married Vera E Cannell (or Eynstone) in 1940 and they lived in London though by 1955 he and Vera were living in Gloucester. His Victory Medal came up for sale in 2018.
2/Lt.
Tawse
Arthur Edward
 
D/58
Arthur Edward Tawse was born on 26 Aug in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire, the son of James and Hannah Tawse. He enlisted into the RFA and was assigned service number 46824, but then sought a commission and attended an Officers Cadet Unit from which he was commissioned as a temporary 2/Lt in the Special Reserve of Officers on 28 Jul 1916. He was posted to D/58 and when the brigade marched from Magnicourt on 28 Aug 1916 for Englebelmer to temporarily join 29 Division, he was placed in command of the baggage wagons at the rear of the march column. Two months later he suffered from shell shock and was evacuated on 26 Oct 1916 at which point he probably left 58 Bde. He remained in the Army and was promoted to Lt on 28 Jan 1918 and was acting as an Adjutant between 27 Jan and 5 Apr 1919 so was made an A/Capt. He resigned his commission on 1 Apr 1920. The previous month he had married Edith May Page in Lewisham. They continued living together until 1939 when they presumably divorced since Arthur married Dorothy M Ressich that year while Edith died on Christmas Day 1969. After Arthur’s marriage to Dorothy, they lived in Kensington, London, and Arthur was working as the Managing Director of a bridge and construction company. Arthur died on 3 Jul 1973 in Lymington, Hants. His younger brother, James Gordon Tawse, had also served as a Captain in the RFA in the war but he died on 25 Apr 1917 from wounds he had received.
Gnr.
Taylor
Herbert
141267
A/58
Herbert Taylor was born in Bradford, Yorks, the son of David Taylor. He enlisted into the RFA in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He was serving in A/58 on 25 Aug 1917 in the Ypres salient when he and six comrades – Gnr Alec Armitage (152294), Gnr John Barber (91942), Gnr Howard Denley (74517), Dvr Frederick Leathard (109178), A/Bdr William Monks (67578) and Gnr Arthur Noble (L/5762) – were killed in action. He is buried alongside them in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, near Ypres, Belgium.
Gnr.
Taylor
James Reginald John
64943
 
James Reginald John Taylor was born in 1883 in Heywood, Wilts the son of John and Jane Taylor. In 1904 he married Mary Ann (surname unknown) and by 1911 they were living in Bath with their three children where James worked as a carter. He enlisted on 14 Jan 1915. He was aged 34 and was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 3 Apr 1918 due to wounds he had received. It is likely that he died in Bath in 1934, aged about 51.
2/Lt.
Taylor
Stanley
n/a
B/58
On 26 Apr 1917, 2/Lt Stanley Taylor was returning from an observation post with his battery commander Maj Grinley when they were both wounded by an enemy 4.2″ high explosive shell. Although both officers received what were described as flesh wounds they were evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station. He may have then been evacuated back to the UK because Capt Carlton Roberts (formerly of D/58) met him in the UK while he was recuperating and wrote in a latter dated 25 Jun 1917 that Stanley Taylor “is going strong too, has got engaged since he has been back”. Stanley Taylor wrote to Richard Blaker (also formerly of D/58) in February 1930 to congratulate Blaker on his book, “Medal Without Bar”; he was living in Chalfont St.Giles, Bucks at the time.
2/Lt.
Taylor
 
n/a
A/58
On 24 Feb 1917 a 2/Lt Taylor was posted to A/58 from 11 Division Ammunition Column. It is yet to be confirmed whether this was the same man as 2/Lt Stanley Taylor (above) who was serving in B/58 two months later.
2/Lt.
Taylor
 
n/a
 
When 58 Bde marched from Magnicourt on 28 Aug 1916 for Englebelmer to temporarily join 29 Division, a 2/Lt Taylor was placed in command of the brigade’s Battery Quartermaster Sergeants who were to set up a re-filling point part-way along the route of the march. It is yet to be confirmed whether this was the same man as 2/Lt Stanley Taylor (above) who was serving in B/58 the following year.
Cpl.
Taylor
   
C/58
On 21 Feb 1915, Cpl Taylor reported Gnr Walter Prince (10685) for being absent from church parade while they were training at Leeds. On 3 May 1915, the now Sgt Taylor witnessed Gnr Cyril Smith (11265) overstaying his leave from Milford Camp on 3 May 1915.
Dvr.
Theakston
Wilfred Edgar
93052
B/58
Wilfred Edgar Theakston was born in about 1898 in Kings Cross, London the son of George A and Alice M Theakston. He enlisted in Mill Hill, London on 26 Aug 1914 aged 16. though he claimed to be 19 and claimed to be a motor driver, which was in fact his father’s profession. He was posted initially to No.6 RFA Depot in Glasgow as a Driver on 29 Aug 1914 and from there on 14 Sep.1914 to 185 Battery, which became B/58. Four days later he was appointed A/Bdr on 18 Sep 1914 and he was one of the NCOs who reported Dvr Ernest Ballard (10994) being absent from barracks over New Year 1915. Wilfred reverted to Driver on 24 Feb 1915. He went with the brigade to Egypt and served at Suvla Bay. But then on 21 Nov 1915 he was posted to 146 Bde RFA, 28 Division at Salonika. While serving there he was punished for being neglectful while on piquet duty and for losing a rifle. He was also transferred at some point to 84 Infantry Bde’s Small Arms Ammunition Column, also part of 28 Division. He was admitted to 28 General Hospital at Salonika and then on 6 Jun 1916 was transferred onto the Hospital Ship “Duneale Castle” [probably “Dunluce Castle”]. Whatever had caused Wilfred to be admitted to hospital must have been serious since he was being sent home permanently, meaning that he would not serve overseas again. He was posted to 5C Reserve Bde on 16 Jul 1916. He then went to the Royal Artillery Command Centre at Ripon on 8 Sep 1916. His charge sheet while back in the UK was extensive with seven offences recorded while at Boyton (near Warminster) and Salisbury between 23 Oct 1916 and 25 Aug 1917. When he left Salonika he had been described as sober, intelligent and very reliable and had expressed interest in becoming a groom which may influenced why he was posted to No.2 RFA Officer Cadet School in Exeter on 5 Sep 1917. However, while there he got into a great deal of trouble including being drunk and creating a disturbance in Exeter High Street on 2 Mar 1918 as well as violently resisted the escort. Then on 30 May 1918 he used obscene language to an NCO and created “a disturbance after lights out”. He was absent from 10pm tattoo roll call until 11.50 pm on 15 Jun 1918, he broke out of barracks whilst in open arrest and was absent from 10pm that day until 6.30am on 17 Jun 1918. After the Armistice, he attended No.1 Dispersal Unit at Crystal Palace on 22 Feb 1919 and was discharged from the Army on 22 Mar 1919. His application the following year for a disability pension was rejected, because it was determined he had no disability. He returned to live in his parents’ home in Edmonton after the war. In later life historian Peter Hart recorded a lengthy interview with Wilfred about his war service which is held by the Imperial War Museum.
Dvr.
Thompson
Arthur
112402
A/58
Arthur Thompson was the son of Robert and Jane Thompson of Moss Side, Tarleton, Preston, Lancs. On 8 Mar 1917, a section of A/58 had to be moved up to the front line on a congested road. The road came under fire and Dvr Arthur Thompson was killed, aged 22. He is buried in Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel, France.
Dvr.
Thompson   
Francis Edwin
110884
C/58
Francis Edwin Thompson was born on 31 Dec 1890 in Draughton, near Skipton, Yorks the son Edwin and Isabella Thompson. He worked as a warp dresser and married Jessie Gladys Willmore on 25 Apr 1914 in Sutton-in-Craven near Keighley, their son Jack was born on 7 Nov 1914. Francis enlisted into the Army on 17 Oct 1915 in Keighley and was posted initially to No.4 Depot at Woolwich. From there he went to 2B Reserve Bde and then to 4A Reserve Bde before being posted overseas to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force Base Depot. He sailed from Devonport on 15 Mar 1916, arriving in Alexandria on 26 Mar 1916. From there he joined C/58 at el-Ferdan near the Suez Canal on 10 Apr 1916. He then sailed with his battery from Alexandria on 25 Jun 1916, docking in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916. He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, the award being gazetted on 17 Sep 1917 and was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 16 Sep 1917. He was appointed an A/Bdr on 1 Apr 1918 and then promoted to Bdr on 2 Jun 1918, replacing Bdr Stanley Mooney (L/13701). The following year he was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK between 28 Sep and 17 Oct 1918. On 21 Jan 1919 he was appointed a paid A/Cpl to replace A/Cpl James Bell (710204) who had returned to the UK for demobilisation. He had further leave from 26 Apr 1919, then on 18 Jun 1919 he was sent back to the UK via Boulogne for demobilisation. He attended No.1 Dispersal Unit, North Camp Ripon on 20 Jun 1919 and was demobbed on 18 Jul 1919. At his request the separation allowance had been stopped for his wife (and replaced by a “motherless rate” for his son, Jack) in December 1917 after he had found out that Jessie was co-habiting with another man. They divorced in 1920 and in 1923 Francis married Dorothy Barrett. In 1939 he and Dorothy were living in Skipton and both were working in the local worsted industry where Francis was a foreman wanger. Francis died in 1955, aged 64.
         
 
BSM
Thorne
William
21917
B/58
William Thorne (occasionally spelled as Thorn) was born in Bedminster, Bristol in about 1882, the son of William Henry and Emma Thorne. He was a pre-war soldier who was awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal which was given to those who served in South Africa during the Second Boer War at some time between 11 Oct 1899 and 31 May 1902. William served as a Gunner in 19th Battery RFA and was awarded two clasps: Tugela Heights and Relief of Ladysmith. He was evacuated back to the UK on 30 Aug 1900. He married Catherine Melvin and they appeared to have settled in Gateshead. He was serving as a Sergeant in 30 Bde RFA in 1914 when he went to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force, landing in France on 19 Aug 1914. He was serving as the BSM of B/58 in the Ypres salient when he was killed in action, aged 35, on 26 Sep 1917. He is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.
Gnr.
Thornton
William Henry
970741
 
William Henry Thornton was born in 1895. He enlisted into the Army on 17 Feb 1915 and served in the Territorial Force in 2nd London Bde RFA. He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 3 May 1918 due to wounds he had received. He gave his address as c/o Mrs Bleek Lois, Weedon, nr Towcester, Northants.
Gnr.
Tilbury
Edward Lionel
1128
D/58
Edward Lionel Tilbury was born in about 1895 in Meonstoke, Bishops Waltham, Hants, the son of James and Margaret E M Tilbury. In 1911 he was working as an under-gardener and in 1914 as a groom. He enlisted into the RFA in Winchester on 3 Sep 1914 aged 19 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea. On 1 Oct 1914 he was posted to A/60, then at some point to HQ 60 Bde. He sailed with the brigade from Devonport on 4 Jul 1915, disembarking in Alexandria on 19 Jul 1915. He then sailed from Alexandria on 18 Oct 1915, landing at Suvla Bay on 25 Oct 1915. After the withdrawal from Gallipoli and return to Egypt, he sailed from Alexandria on 2 Jul 1916, arriving in Marseilles on 10 Jul 1916. He was granted leave to the UK between 12 and 21 Jan 1917 and shortly after his return he was posted to 11 Division’s Royal Artillery HQ staff on 28 Jan 1917. Three months later he was posted to D/58 on 26 Apr 1917. While in D/58 he acted as the soldier servant to 2/Lt Richard Blaker and after Blaker left the brigade on 10 Jul 1917 due to sickness, Edward wrote to him on 21 Sep 1917 regarding Blaker’s kit, adding that he regretted no longer having such a “cushy” job as being Blaker’s servant: he had taken over the role as D/58’s mess cook after Gnr William Riding (79459) had been injured on 6 Aug 1917. He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK on 18 Jan 1918 and after the Armistice he was granted another 14 days’ leave to the UK via Boulogne on 23 Dec 1918. On 23 Jan 1919 he was posted to the Dispersal Centre at Wimbledon and was demobbed on 20 Feb 1919. He married Dottie Eva Triggs in 1921 in Droxford, Hants and they had a daughter. Edward died in 1931 in Westhampnett, nr Chichester, Sussex at the age of 36.
Gnr.
Tiley
Arthur  
11150
C/58
Arthur Tiley was born in 1895 in Portbury, Somerset. He was the son of George and Sarah Ann Tiley and in 1911 was working as a farm labourer, aged 15. He was working as a labourer when he enlisted in Bristol on 4 Sep 1914, aged 19. He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and was then posted to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914. On 23 Dec 1914 he was posted to C/58. While at Milford Camp he over-stayed leave by 22 hours on 2-3 May 1915 so was confined to barracks for 7 days CB and docked a day’s pay by Lt E J Franklin. On 1 Jul 1915 he sailed with his battery from Devonport, arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915, then sailed from Alexandria on 1 Aug 1915, disembarking on Gallipoli on 12 Aug 1915. He was evacuated from Gallipoli a few weeks later and was admitted to 17 General Hospital in Alexandria on 19 Sep 1915 with an undiagnosed fever. He was embarked on a hospital ship on 24 or 25 Sep 1915 for evacuation to the UK, by which time his illness appears to have been diagnosed as enteric fever and was back in the UK by 7 Nov 1915. Ten months later he was posted to France on 20 Sep 1916 and was posted to B/59 on 2 Oct 1916. Just a few weeks later, on 10 Nov 1916, he was wounded with shrapnel in his left thigh and knee so was admitted to 12 Canadian Field Ambulance but appears to have rejoined his battery later the same day. On 6 Feb 1917 he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance with scabies and was discharged back to his unit on 8 Mar 1917. On 27 Aug 1917 he was attached to D/59, but returned to B/59 on 5 Sep 1917. He then went to 11 Divisional Artillery school for a signalling course on 25 Nov 1917, returning to his battery on 22 Dec 1917. Between 20 Jan and 4 Feb 1918 he attended further signalling training at the same school and then again yet more training between 17 Jun and 8 Jul 1918. He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK via Calais between 14 and 28 Oct 1918. He was attached to Bessemer Dump between 2 and 4 Mar 1919 and then returned to the UK for demobilisation, attending No.1 Dispersal Centre at Fovant on 26 Mar 1919. He was demobbed on 23 Apr 1919. Later that year he acted as best man to his brother Frank, when Frank married a Miss Maud Irene Waters at the English Congregational Church, Bridgend on 18 Nov 1919. Arthur appears to have joined the Civil Service because the Civil Service Commission made enquiries about his military service in 1925.
Gnr.
Tindall
Fred 
63854
 
Fred Tindall enlisted into the RFA on 4 Jan 1915. He was posted to France, arriving on about 9 Sep 1915. He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army on 28 Dec 1917 due to wounds he had received.
Gnr.
Toghill
William Joseph
11003
B/58
William Joseph Toghill was born on 30 Jul 1895 in Earthcott, near Bristol. He was the eldest son of Mark and Amelia Selina Toghill. In 1911 he was 16 years old and living with his family in Mangotsfield where he worked as a carpenter. He was working as a motor tester when he enlisted into the RFA in Bristol on 5 Sep 1914 aged 19 and was posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea the following day. He was then posted to 185 Battery on 14 Sep 1914 which became B/58. He went to Egypt with the brigade but then two days before the brigade landed on Gallipoli, William was severely wounded on 7 Aug 1915 and was evacuated back to the UK. He was admitted to the American Hospital in Paignton on 26 Aug 1915 and posted, for administrative purposes, to 49 Reserve Battery, 5C Reserve Bde the same day. He remained in the UK for the remainder of the war. On 2 Oct 1916, the American Hospital in Paignton reported that he was “almost convalesced”. In 1917 he married Sarah Cecily Jefferies and after the Armistice he attended No.1 Dispersal Unit at Chiseldon on 17 Feb 1919 and was demobilised on 19 Mar 1919. He returned to live in Bristol, settling in Colston St, Soundwell. He and Sarah lived for many years in Soundwell and in 1939 he, Sarah and their son, William E F Toghill, were still living there and he was working as a driller in a tool room. William Joseph Toghill died in Bristol in 1975, aged 79.
Gnr.
Tomlinson
Herbert Leslie
835572
C/58
Herbert Leslie Tomlinson was born on 28 Aug 1896 in Balsall Heath, Birmingham, the son of Henry Willliam and Janet Tomlinson. In 1907 he went to St Edward’s School in Birmingham where he studied a primarily scientific, rather than classical, curriculum. According to the school’s records his marks at school were about average with his highest performance in French and he came second in his class in 1912 in gymnastics. He enlisted in Birmingham and was appointed a despatch rider in the Royal Engineers. He then transferred to the Royal Artillery Territorial Force (TF), joining the 3rd South Midland Bde RFA (TF), part of 46 (South Midland) Division and was assigned service number 1594. He went overseas to France probably with that brigade on 1 Apr 1915. When the TF service numbers were reorganised he was assigned the new number 835572. In March 1917 he was serving in 15 Division Ammunition Column. On 22 May 1918 he was serving in C/58 and was apparently in one of the hospitals in St Omer, presumably No.10 Stationary Hospital, when it was bombed by enemy aircraft. He was killed aged 21 and his body was recovered the following day. The reason for Herbert being in hospital is not given, but it was reported that he had twice been gassed during his Army service and it is possible that he was one of the many members of 58 Bde who were gassed on 9 Apr 1918 and as a result had been hospitalised. He left all of his possessions to his younger sister Janet Kathleen Tomlinson and he is buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, France.
Sgt.
Tracey
   
D/58?
On 19 Apr 1917, Sgt Tracey witnessed Gnr Ted Hayes (10672) mis-treating a horse, leading to Hayes being punished.
2/Lt.
Trotman
Percy Harold
n/a
C/58
Percy Harold Trotman was born in London on 3 Aug 1880. He was the son of Howard and Harriet Trotman and in 1901 he was working for his father, a pleating manufacturer, as his father’s clerk. In 1908 he married Elsie Amelia Ashdown and three years later in 1911 he was working as an automobile engineer. He was commissioned into the RFA on 7 Feb 1917 and was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) from Base on 5 May 1917. He appears to have left 11 DAC because he was posted back to that unit from Base again on 26 Dec 1917. On 30 Mar 1918 he was attached to C/58 but just 10 days later he was gassed on 9 Apr 1918 along with many others and so he retired to the wagon lines. He must have been badly affected by the gas because he was struck off the strength of the brigade on 14 Apr 1918 having been “wounded gas” and relinquished his commission due to ill health on 21 Jan 1919. (He had in the interim been promoted to Lt on 7 Aug 1918). By 1939 he, Elsie and their daughter Ursula had moved to Hove, Sussex. Percy died aged 60 on 4 Nov 1941 in Hove, Sussex just a few months after Elsie.
Bdr.
Trott
Albert Charles
10588
C/58
Albert Charles Trott was born in 1887 in Drayton, near Langport in Somerset, the son of Charles and Fanny Trott. By the age of 13 he was already working as a general farm labourer. He married Albina Maud Moore in Wells, Somerset on 23 Oct 1909 and they lived with Albina’s parents in Street, Somerset. In 1911 Albert was working as a mason’s labourer. Shortly after war was declared Albert enlisted into the RFA in Taunton on 5 Sep 1914. He was posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 186 Battery which became C/58. He was appointed A/Bdr on 2 Nov 1914 and promoted to Bdr on 24 Mar 1915. He sailed with the brigade from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915 arriving in Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915. He then sailed again from Alexandria on 29 Jul 1915 and landed on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915. On 24 Sep 1915 he was appointed A/Cpl to replace Cpl David Lloyd (58639) who had himself been promoted. Only a few weeks later Albert was promoted to Sgt on 6 Nov 1915 in place of a Sgt Taylor. Albert sailed with the brigade from Egypt to France on 25 Jun 1916. He will have left 58 Bde when he was evacuated back to the UK due either to sickness or wounds and was in hospital in 2 Western General Hospital in Manchester with myalgia [muscle pain] between 14 May and 5 Jul 1917. He was suffering from pain in his back and legs as well as headaches. He attended a Clearing Office on 14 Jul 1917 and was posted to 49 Reserve Battery, 6th Reserve Bde in Luton on 7 Aug 1917. Shortly after the Armistice he was hospitalised with influenza In Brook War Hospital in Woolwich between 4 and 18 Dec 1918. He attended a dispersal centre at the Crystal Palace on 15 Feb 1919 and returned to live in Street. On 8 Sep 1922 he enlisted into the territorial army in Glastonbury. He was assigned service number 747937 and he joined 374 Battery, 94th Somerset Bde RFA. Albert and Albina were still living in Street when Albert died on 15 July 1959.
Gnr.
Turner
Albert Lawrance
53720
C/58
Albert Lawrance Turner was the son of Thomas and Jane Turner of Wood Green, London. He enlisted into the RFA and was posted to France arriving there on about 3 Sep 1915. He was serving in C/58 when he died on 29 Mar 1917, aged 23, and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France.
 
Upton 
W
 
D/58
On 2 Dec 1916, W Upton wrote to his commanding officer, 2/Lt Richard Blaker, from No.9 General Hospital in Rouen to thank Blaker for the help he had given him after he had been wounded by a shell fragment in his ankle. Upton was recovering after having had the fragment removed and was expecting to return to the UK for further recuperation.
BSM
Varney
William Ewart
51358
B/58
William Ewart Varney was born in 1883 in Newington, London the son of George and Annie Varney. In 1901 he was working as a hospital porter. He was a pre-was regular soldier having enlisted into the Army in London on 11 Feb 1903, aged 19 for 3 years with the Colours and 9 years in the Reserve. He was a tall man at just under 6′ and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) with service number 14522 and joined No.1 Depot Company RGA at Dover Castle the following day. He fell ill with influenza so was hospitalised between 26 Feb and 3 Mar 1903 and was then posted to No.7 Company RGA on 14 Mar 1903. Army life must have suited him because after nine months he decided to extend his service to 8 years with the Colours. On 4 Feb 1904 he was posted overseas, being sent to join No.85 Company RGA in India. He fell ill with ague [possibly malaria] and so was hospitalised between 5 and 11 Nov 1904. He was hospitalised again the following year when he got tonsillitis between 9 and 16 Jun 1905. Shortly after this he was granted his 1st Good Conduct badge on 14 Jul 1905 though he subsequently forfeited the badge on 14 Sep 1907. He again fell ill with ague between 23 and 31 Jul 1906. He was appointed A/Bdr on 25 Mar 1907 and was posted to Aden on 13 Jan 1909. He was promoted to Bdr on 21 Mar 1909 and to Cpl on 6 Apr 1910 before being posted to Bombay [Mumbai] on 5 Oct 1910. He had further extended his service to 12 years with the Colours on 13 Jul 1910 but the following year probably during his furlough back in the UK he was discharged at his own request on 31 Jul 1911. After war was declared he re-enlisted into the Army this time joining the RFA on 16 Sep 1914 as a Cpl and was assigned the service number 51358. He sailed to Egypt on 2 Jul 1915 possibly with 59 Bde RFA and by 22 Nov 1915 he had become a BSM in 59 Bde because on that date a refund of £9 was paid to Albert E Varney. It is unclear when he transferred to 58 Bde: he is first noted serving in that brigade when he reverted to BSM on 27 Nov 1917 and was posted to B/58 having previously been acting as the RSM for the brigade. After this he was cited as a witness to at least two B/58 soldiers’ offences: Gnr William Pearce (67937) was absent from roll call at parade on 10 Jul 1918 and Cpl Ernie Baron (148993) made an improper complaint on 3 Dec 1918. William Varney was Mentioned in Despatches on 23 Dec 1918. He died on 8 Sep 1939 in Knowle, Fareham, Hants, leaving a widow, Louisa Ellen Varney.
Gnr.
Vertigan
George Albert
10625
B/58
George Albert Vertigan was born on 14 Nov 1892 in Kempston, Beds the son of Isaac Albert and Susanna Vertigan. He was initially known as Albert George, but this had changed to George Albert by the time he was baptised in 1897. In 1911 he was working as a steel turner and by 1914 he was working as a marker-off and turner, most likely for The British Thomson-Houston Co in Rugby. He enlisted into the RFA in Rugby on 31 Aug 1914, aged 21, and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea. From there he was posted on 10 Sep 1914 to 185 Battery which became B/58. During his training he got into trouble twice: on 31 Jan 1915 he missed the 9 a.m. parade then broke out of barracks whilst a prisoner at large and did not return until 9 p.m. on 2 Feb 1915 so was confined to barracks for 7 days by his battery commander Maj Meyricke, then a few days before being posted overseas he was absent from the 4 p.m. water and feed for the horses at Milford Camp on 27 Jun 1915 so was confined to barracks for 5 days by Maj Meyricke. He may have escaped some of this later punishment because on 1 Jul 1915 he sailed with the brigade from Devonport on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915. He then sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, landing on Gallipoli on 9 Aug 1915. On 10 Dec 1915 he was admitted to No.54 Casualty Clearing Station at Suvla Bay and then transferred to No.26 Casualty Clearing Station at Mudros with pyrexia. He was evacuated to Malta where he was admitted to hospital on 16 Dec 1915. He was then sent to the Convalescent Camp at Ghajn Tuffieha, Malta on 23 Feb 1916. At some point he then made his way to France, because he was granted leave to the UK from the Base depot at Le Havre between 24 Oct and 3 Nov 1917 during which he married Lillian Mabel Chambers in St Andrews Church, Rugby on 31 Oct 1917. After his leave ended he was posted to join 31 Battery in 35 Bde RFA in Italy on 16 Nov 1917. He travelled by train and arrived in Italy on 30 Nov 1917 and appears to have acted as a trumpeter in this unit. A year later he was admitted to hospital with influenza on 19 Oct 1918 and ten days later was sent to the Convalescent Depot. He attended No.2 Dispersal Unit at Chiseldon on 19 Jan 1919 and was demobbed on 16 Feb 1919. After this he returned to live in Rugby and may have returned to work for The British Thomson-Houston Co. He and Lillian were still living in Rugby in 1939 at which time George was working as a machine shop foreman in an engineering company. George Vertigan died on 29 Dec 1972, aged 80.
Lt. Col.
Vigne
Robert Austen
 
Bde Cdr
Robert Austen Vigne was born in London on 15 Jan 1862, the son of John and Frances Anna Vigne. He attended Wellington College and was commissioned into the Royal Artillery. On 26 Jul 1881 he was promoted to Lt and on 15 Jan 1890 he was promoted to Capt. The following year he was serving at the Royal Artillery barracks at Hilsea and on 8 April of that year he married Edith Isobel Scott in Christ Church, Cheltenham. He was promoted to Major on 9 Oct 1899 and to brevet Lt Col on 21 Jul 1907. He retired from the Army but after war was declared he rejoined from the Reserve of Officers and was posted to be commander of 58 Bde RFA at Leeds on 16 Sep 1914. He must have left the brigade by February 1915 because by then Lt Col Kuper was the brigade commander. In the King’s Birthday Honours of 1918 he was appointed a Companion to the Order of Saint Michael and Saint George. On 15 May 1919 he was appointed a District Remount Officer on retired pay and on 3 Jun 1919 he was appointed a CBE. Robert Vigne died on 10 Nov 1940 while spending time in Aberdovey, Wales.
Gnr.
Wakelin
Lewis
111325
D/58
Lewis Wakelin (born Louis Wakelin) was born in about 1895 in Selby, Yorks, the son of James Herbert and Elizabeth Wakelin.  He served in 458 Battery, 118 Bde RFA, and presumably transferred with his battery to join the new D/58 on 15 Jul 1916.  He was 22 years old and was serving in D/58 when he and four comrades were killed in action on 3 Oct 1917 while serving in the Ypres salient.  The five of them were originally buried at 28c.4.d.9.3, but he and his four comrades, Gnr W D Smyth (14514), Gnr A Himsworth (117053), Cpl A H Willcox (965451), Bdr G Miller (82899), were all re-buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium on 4 Dec 1919. 
2/Lt.
Waldron
Reginald Stephen 
n/a
D/58
Reginald Stephen Waldron (known as Stephen) was born on 14 Apr 1877 in Ramsbury, Wilts, the son of gentleman farmer Stephen Waldron and his wife Mary.  He was 34 years old and working as a tea planter when he enlisted as a private into the 16th Lancers at Woolwich on 1 Sep 1914 and was assigned service number 7061.  His medical records showed that he was missing the forefinger of his right hand.  Just over three weeks later he was posted to France on 25 Sep 1914, disembarking on the 28th.  He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (gazetted on 3 Jun 1915) and the Medal of St George 3rd Class which was gazetted on 25 Aug 1915.  He was discharged from the Lancers on 10 Oct 1915 because he was granted a temporary commission in the RFA Special Reserve the following day.  His service over the following year is not known, the next record shows that he was serving as a 2/Lt in D/58 at Christmas 1916 when he was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK on 26 Dec 1916. While the brigade was resting early the following year, he was sent on a signalling course at 11 Division’s Signalling School in Yvrench on 9 Feb 1917.  On 10 Apr 1917, when the brigade suffered many casualties from a gas attack, he was admitted to 42 Field Ambulance, returning to his unit on 21 Apr 1917. On 1 July 1917 he was promoted to Lt and a fortnight later on 15 Jul 1917 he was granted 10 days’ leave to the UK, but this was subsequently extended on medical grounds to 15 Aug 1917 on advice from a dentist since he had an exposed nerve in his teeth.  He was granted further leave to the UK on 15 Nov 1917, returning to his battery on 1 Dec 1917.  While on leave, his award of the Military Cross was gazetted on 19 Nov 1917 saying that it was awarded “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his battery came under heavy enemy shell fire which exploded an ammunition dump and buried one of the officers of the battery, he worked with two others for half an hour under heavy fire until they succeeded in digging out the officer. His gallantry and utter disregard of danger were a magnificent example to all.” He had a further period of leave from 27 Feb 1918, returning on 15 Mar 1918.  On 27 May 1918 he was sent to 1 Corps Officers’ Rest Station suffering from debility, returning to his battery on 12 Jun 1918.  He left France, when he was sent for a tour of 6 months’ duty at home on 19 Jun 1918.  Waldron was clearly a popular officer in his battery and, being so much older than most subalterns, was inevitably known as Daddy Waldron.  He is portrayed warmly by Richard Blaker as “Dad” Whitelaw in his semi-autobiographical account of life in D/58 “Medal Without Bar”. While one mutual acquaintance remarked that Blaker had “hit Roberts and Daddy Waldron off perfectly,“ Waldron himself commented that Blaker had “made me seem a little bolder than I ever felt”.  On 9 Jan 1919 Lt R. Stephen Waldron attended No.1 Dispersal Unit at Crystal Palace for demobilisation and resigned his commission on 11 Mar 1920.  He returned to live in Maidenhead after the war, describing himself as a ranch owner and as a stock breeder, though by 1930 appeared to be basing himself while in the UK in Red Lion Hotel, Henley-on-Thames.  He is recorded as having made many long sea voyages, including returning to Southampton from Buenos Aires on 28 Apr 1923 on SS “Arlaza”, and going from Bristol via Bermuda for Kingston, Jamaica, in 1925 and again in 1927.  He sailed from London on the “Mooltan” on 4 Mar 1938 for Marseilles, and he arrived back in Avonmouth on 25 Mar 1939 on SS “Ariguani” from Kingston, Jamaica.  He died on 21 Apr 1967 in Reading, Berks, aged 90.  
Sgt 
Walker
   
A/58
During a very heavy barrage on 21 Aug 1917, Sgt Walker was described as conspicuous among the men of A/58 in putting out dumps and providing aid to the wounded of his battery and other batteries.
Lt. Col.
Walker   
C E
n/a
Bde Cdr
Lt Col C E Walker DSO was attached to 58 Bde on 7 Feb 1918 from 42 Division. A week later he assumed command of 58 Bde while its commander, Lt Col Henry Wray was absent attending a course between 15 Feb and 4 Mar 1918. The following month he again assumed command when Lt Col Wray was slightly gassed and needed to go to a rest station on 20 Apr 1918, returning ten days later on 30 Apr 1918. Lt Col Walker probably left 58 Bde on 4 May 1918 when he was appointed the officer in command of the new 11 Division Artillery School on 4 May 1918.
Lt.
Walker    
C M
n/a
A/58
Lt C M Walker joined A/58 on 28 Aug 1918 though was not formally attached to them until 28 Oct 1918. At about the time of the Armistice he was granted leave, rejoining his battery on 21 Nov 1918. He had a further spell of leave between 19 Jan and 12 Feb 1919, and was then sent to the UK for demobilisation on 15 Feb 1919.
Gnr.
Wall
Samuel George 
951288
A/58
A son of Joseph Samuel Baker and Caroline Baker enlisted in Kennington, London into the Territorial Force and joined the 5th London Bde RFA under the name Samuel George Wall. (The Bakers appear to have been known as Samuel and Carry and had two sons and two daughters with the two sons being Samuel Baker who was born in about 1894 and George Baker who was born in about 1896. Both sons were born in Newington, London). On 23 April 1917 Samuel George Wall was serving in A/58 near Arras when he was killed in action aged 21, another member of A/58 being wounded at the same time.
2/Lt.
Wallington
F E
n/a
D/58
2/Lt F E Wallington left 3/2nd London Bde RFA on 3 Jul 1917 when he proceeded overseas. He went to the Base depot in France and was posted from there to 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 9 Jul 1917 but then moved on from 11 DAC four days later when he was posted to 58 Bde on 13 Jul 1917 and assigned to D/58. He was acting as a Forward Observation Officer on the first day of the battle of Passchendaele when he was wounded in action on 12 Oct 1917. Despite his wounds, he reported back to the brigade to inform them of what was going on before seeking treatment. His wounds may have been sufficient for him to be evacuated and so to leave 58 Bde because a year later, on 20 Nov 1918, he was serving back in 2nd London Bde RFA when he was promoted to Lt.
Cpl.
Ward
   
B/58?
On 10 Jul 1918, Cpl Ward was cited as the witness to Gnr William Pearce (67937) of B/58 being absent from roll call at parade.
Lt.
Ward 
H T
n/a
D/58
2/Lt H T Ward was serving in 60 Brigade Ammunition Column when he went to Egypt on about 14 Oct 1915. On 9 Oct 1917 Lt H T Ward was serving in D/58 when he was granted an extension to his leave due to a medical certificate. He was granted the acting rank of Captain between 6 Sep and 18 Oct 1917. He had returned a couple of months later when he took temporary command of four 4 howitzers of D/58 on 9 Dec 1917 to help 46 Division’s Artillery while Capt Aikenhead was recovering from a knee injury. Lt Ward went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 12 Jan 1918, returning to his battery on 28 Jan 1918. Between 13 Apr and 3 Jun 1918 he was again appointed an A/Capt, during which on 7 May 1918 he was sent to the 1 Corps Officers’ Rest Station. He took eight other ranks to the Divisional Reception Camp on 24 Sep 1918 prior to them all going on leave. He returned from leave to his battery on 24 Oct 1918. In the last days of the conflict as the Germans were retreating he was sent out on a mounted patrol at noon on 6 Nov 18 to ascertain and report what was going on and after the patrol he returned with what was described as most valuable and accurate information obtained “under great difficulty”. After the Armistice he was appointed Area Commandant of the commune of La Croisette, Pas de Calais, on 27 Feb 1919. He went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 19 Mar 1919.
2/Lt.
Wardlaw
Peter Hutchinson
10626
A/58
Peter Hutchinson Wardlaw was born on 29 Jun 1888 in Alloa, Clackmannanshire, the son of James and Mary Wardlaw (née Hutchinson).  He was educated at Alloa Secondary Academy and trained as an engineer.  In 1911 he met Catherine Bell Hay (known as Kate) and they began a romance.  Also that year he moved to Rugby to find work as an engineer and in 1913 helped set up a new company in Lutterworth, Leics, to make a new seed-sowing machine.  That work was interrupted by the outbreak of war and, feeling it his duty to volunteer, Peter enlisted in Rugby on 1 Sep 1914.  He was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there was posted to 185 Battery on 10 Sep 1914 in Leeds.   He was promoted to Cpl on 13 Nov 1914 and was transferred to 184 Battery on 5 Jan 1915 which became A/58.  He was promoted to Sgt on 11 Feb 1915 and had a week’s farewell leave before sailing for Egypt and Gallipoli with his battery.  While serving at Gallipoli, Peter was appointed A/BQMS on 16 Oct 1915.  After 58 Bde was withdrawn back to Egypt, Peter applied for a commission in March 1916.  He was appointed to a commission as a temporary 2/Lt on probation and assumed the duties of an officer with effect from 1 May 1916 and did “not require further training before taking up the duties of an officer”.  His battery commander wanted him to remain in his own battery, and although at the time it had its full complement of officers, the request was granted.  He re-joined A/58 in late August 1916 after an absence of unknown duration and was described by his commanding officer as “a real good fellow” and “very Scotch”.   A month later, Peter was acting as a Forward Observation Officer with the infantry during the first day of the Battle of Thiepval on 26 Sep 1916 when he was severely injured by a shell blast.  He had a preliminary operation at a Casualty Clearing Station and then his left leg was amputated above the knee at No.7 Stationary Hospital, Boulogne; he had also been wounded in the head and hand and was partially deaf in his right ear. He was evacuated back to the UK on 11 Oct 1916 on the HS “St Andrew” and admitted to 2nd Western General Hospital, Manchester, where his leg was further amputated in the thigh to leave a stump suitable for an artificial limb.  He was granted sick leave until 25 May 1917 and a gratuity of £250 for the loss of his leg.  Meanwhile his fiancée, Kate, who had spent the past 5 years teaching in New Zealand, returned to the UK, via the USA, to be with Peter.  A Medical Board held on 23 May 1917 at Leicester concluded that Peter would still be unfit for any duty for at least a further 3 months so sent him home to Lutterworth pending availability at Queen Mary’s Convalescent Auxiliary Hospital for Officers, in Dover House, Roehampton.  He went to Roehampton a few weeks later and was fitted with an artificial leg and pelvic band, the cost of £20 17s for the new leg being borne by the War Office.   Peter returned to Lutterworth to recuperate and he and Kate married on 20 Sep 1917 but sadly separated shortly afterwards.  Peter attended a further Medical Board at Adastral House on 1 Oct 1917 which stated that he was now fit for office work.  He worked for the Ministry of Munitions in Sheffield and was promoted to Lt on 1 Nov 1917.  Kate gave birth to a son, Elliott, on 4 Jan 1918 but with the estrangement, Peter never met his son.  On 31 Jan 1918, Peter sought a Medical Board with the aim of being invalided out of the service.  This was held on 12 Mar 1918 at 3rd Northern General Hospital, Sheffield which confirmed that he was fit for administrative duties and it wasn’t until a further board on 3 Jun 1919 at East Leeds War Hospital when he was declared no longer fit for any military service and so was discharged, relinquishing his commission on 2 Jul 1919 due to ill health caused by wounds.  Kate returned to Alloa with her son but died aged 50 on 3 Dec 1938.  Shortly afterwards, Peter, who was now living in London, married Carrie Whiston in February 1939 and that same year he was working in the War Office, but two years later, he died suddenly aged 53 on 3 Jul 1941.   Further information can be found in “Broken by Messines” by Dr Mark Wardlaw.
2/Lt.
Watchorn  
Bruce Baynton
 
B/58
Bruce Baynton Watchorn was an Australian who was born on 19 Feb 1897 at Battery Point, Hobart, Tasmania, the son of Edwin Thomas and Ethel Maude Watchorn.  His father was a Colonel and had served in the South African War, and Bruce had served for 4 years in the cadet force in Tasmania when he arrived in the UK on the SS “Corinthic” as a 19-year old clerk on 9 Nov 1916.  On 6 Dec 1916, he enlisted as a cadet gunner in the RHA with service number 175241 and studied at St John’s Wood until he was commissioned as 2/Lt on 26 May 1917.  He went to France, sailing from Southampton on 9 Jul 1917 arriving in Le Havre the following day.  He was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 15 Jul 1917 and joined B/58 on 6 Aug 1917.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 13 Oct 1917.  The unit’s war diary described it as “For gallantry and great devotion to duty in bty position at various dates and particularly on 4 Oct when, one gun being knocked out by a direct hit, he fired full rate with remaining two guns” though when the official announcement of his award was made it said “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in charge of a battery engaged in firing a barrage. The battery was heavily shelled, suffering severe casualties to one of its detachments. He, however, carried out the task allotted to him, showing the utmost courage and resource under most trying circumstances.”  He was granted leave to the UK between 28 Oct and 7 Nov 1917.   He acted as Forward Observation Officer on 9 Oct 1917 and went on 14 days’ leave between 10 and 26 Feb 1918.  On 1 Mar 1918 the CO of 58 Bde, Lt Col Winter warmly recommended him for a permanent commission, describing him as a “keen and zealous officer” who had “performed his duties in a most satisfactory manner”.  In 1920, that application was turned down by the War Office.  Bruce Watchorn was temporarily attached to C/58 on 10 Apr 1918 following the major gas attacks on the brigade over the previous two days.  Along with 16 other ranks he was sent to 1st Army Royal Artillery Rest Camp on 21 Apr 1918.  He then attended a 6 week course at 1st Army Signal School, returning to the brigade on 11 Jun 1918 and was attached to HQ 58 Bde.   He left to attend another signalling course at 1 Army Signalling School on 15 Sep 1918, returning to the brigade on 7 Oct 1918.  He then had another period of leave between 19 Oct and 4 Nov 1918 and was promoted to Lt on 20 Nov 1918.  He went to Royal Artillery HQ on 22 Jan 1919 and went to the UK on leave on 17 Feb 1919.  He left 58 Bde on 15 Mar 1919 when he was posted to 49 Division Artillery and relinquished his commission on 12 May 1920.  He joined the Australian Armed Forces in 1921 and served in India before joining the Australian Staff Corps in 1924.  He served with 3rd Battery RA in Meerut for a year from May 1926 and was described by his former commanding officer as “a very good fellow: keen, physically well-built, and very even-tempered” and was apparently “very popular with his brother officers”.  In 1931 he considered transferring back to the British Army from the Australian Staff Corps, but subsequently withdrew his application.  He married Gwendoline Sarah Isabel Fulton Rofe, and they had a daughter Rosemary Baynton Watchorn.  During WW2 he was a Lt Col serving as the commander of the Royal Australian Artillery’s 1st Naval Bombardment Group.  He was awarded the OBE shortly after the war.  He died at Double Bay, Sydney, Australia on 8 Aug 1957, aged 60.  
2/Lt.
Waterhouse
Arthur Stanley
 
B/58
Arthur Stanley Waterhouse was born in Woollhara, NSW, Australia on 22 Dec 1893, the son of Jabez Bunting Waterhouse and Emilie Marion Waterhouse, and he obtained a scholarship to Sydney Boys High School. He served as a gunner in the Australian Field Artillery (Militia) before the War and sailed to the UK in late 1915. He enlitsed in St Johns Wood in March 1916 and sought a commission in the RFA. After training at an Officers Cadet Unit in Exeter he was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the Special Reserve on 28 Jul 1916. He probably joined 58 Bde soon after that becuse he was serving with them on the Somme. He was serving in B/58 when he was sent on a signalling course at 11 Division Signalling School at Yvrench on 25 Jan 1917 and then was sent on another signalling course at 2 Corps School on 11 Feb 1917. On 22 Mar 1917, XIII Corps passed him as a 1st class signaller. He was awarded 4 days’ leave to Paris on 2 Jun 1917 and shortly after returning he acted a Forward Observation Officer on the first day of the battle of Messines on 7 Jun 1917. Two months later while serving in the Ypres salient he was gassed in August 1917 resulting in him probably leaving the brigade when he was evacuated back to the UK where he was treated at No.4 London General Hospital. After he was discharged he was employed on home service in Scotland as an acting adjutant. He was promoted to Lt on 28 Jan 1918 and transferred to the R.A.F. in August 1918 where he trained as an observer at No.1 School of Aeronautics, Reading. However, he returned to the RFA when the Armistice was signed and returned to Australia after demobilisation on the SS “Shropshire” where he re-entered Sydney University to study medicine on 26 May 1919. He obtained his Bachelor of Medicine in 1924 and Master of Surgery in 1927. His engagement to Margaret Mary Hope Pearse was announced on 16 Nov 1935 and they married on 29 Jan 1936. They had two children. He had a long medical career culminating in him becoming Superintendent of the Royal North Shore Hospital in NSW. He died on 9 Mar 1974, aged 80.
BSM 
Wealleans
Joshua Phillip
36806
D/58
Joshua Phillip Wealleans was born on 26 Jun 1885 in Guiseborough, Yorks, the son of John and Martha Wealleans. In 1901 he was working as a stock man with cattle, aged 16, at Middleton on Leven, Yorks. He seems to have enlisted into the Army in 1905 and joined the RFA. He married Florence Mary Hooper in 1907 and the following year he and Florence were living in Frimley Green, Surrey when they baptised their son, John James Wealleans on 3 Dec 1908. In 1911 he was a Bdr and had had a second son and the family were living in Aldershot. After war was declared he joined 58 Bde’s Ammunition Column as their BSM very soon after the formation of the unit since he was there on 13 Sep 1914 and was cited as a witness to Bdr Frederick Adams (10979) being absent from parade. The following Spring, after the Ammunition Column had been converted into D/58, he was cited again twice as a witness to soldiers’ offences: Dvr Alexander McMillan overstayed leave by three days between 14 and 17 Mar 1915, and in Milford Gnr Ted Hayes (10672) went absent without leave between 4 and 16 May 1915. It is not clear when he left 58 Bde, but he went to Egypt in July 1915. After the Armistice he was serving in C/59 when he was awarded the Military Medal, the award being gazetted on 13 Jun 1919. In 1939 he and Florence were living in Lyng Easthaugh, near Norwich where Joshua was working as an unestablished postman. Joshua Wealleans died in Norfolk in 1950, aged 65.
L/Bdr.
Weldon
George
20344
B/58
On 9 Mar 1918, L/Bdr George Weldon was serving in B/58 when he went to hospital so was replaced as L/Bdr in the battery by William Pearce (67937).
Gnr.
Westacott
James Henry
89572
B/58
James Henry Westacott was born in Great Wyrley, Staffs on 4 Nov 1894. He was the fifth of Lewis James and Phoebe Westacott’s six children. By 1901, the family had moved to live in Aston, Birmingham and were still there ten years later. James enlisted into the RFA early in the war and went overseas, arriving in Egypt on about 19 Jul 1915. He was serving in B/58 when he was court-martialled on 22 Jun 1917 and just a few weeks later he was killed in action in the Ypres salient on 2 Aug 1917. He is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium.
A/Bdr.
Weston
William
15648
A/58
William Weston was born in Polegate, near Eastbourne in Sussex in about 1882. He was the son of William and Ellen “Matilda” Weston (née Smith) and had four older sisters. It is possible that in 1901 he was serving in the RFA as a driver and was based in Colchester, however by 1911 he was working as a house decorator. He married Daisy Elizabeth Barker in 1910 and they had a daughter, Daisy Eleanor Joyce Weston on 13 Dec 1910. The following year they were living in Eastbourne. He enlisted into the RFA soon after war was declared and was appointed a driver. He went overseas to France, arriving on about 12 Mar 1915. He was serving as an A/Bdr in A/58 near St Léger, south of Arras, France when his battery was very heavily shelled between 2.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. on the morning of 24 Apr 1917 by enemy 5.9″ howitzers, receiving about 500 rounds. William was killed and three other men were wounded. Although his wife was still alive, their daughter’s guardian appears to have been one of William’s older sisters, Jessie. (In 1939, William’s daughter was married and living in Royal Tunbridge Wells and staying with her was Jessie who was now matron at the Royal Eye Hospital in Eastbourne). William Weston is buried in Croisilles British Cemetery, France.
2/Lt.
Wheeler
Edward Blue
 
C/58
Edward Blue Wheeler was born on 5 Nov 1895 in Marion County, South Carolina, USA. He was the third child and second son of Edward B. Wheeler and Effie Wheeler (née Blue) and was educated at the U. S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. He resigned on account of defective vision and was serving as an attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Paris when World War I broke out. He joined the British Army due, apparently, to sympathies with the Allies and applied for a commission. He was commissioned into the RFA as a 2/Lt on 29 Apr 1917 and was posted to join 11 Division Ammunition Column (11 DAC) on 5 Jul 1917. Two days later he transferred to 58 Bde. He was gassed in the Ypres salient in September 1917 and was hospitalised in France. He returned to 11 DAC on 14 Jan 1818 and again transferred quickly to 58 Bde, joining C/58 on 19 Jan 1918. As well as having been gassed he was apparently wounded twice more, being shell-shocked, wounded in the head by shrapnel and machine gunned in the hip. He was promoted to Lt on 29 Oct 1918 and appointed A/Capt while acting as 2iC of a battery on 5 Jan 1919. He was appointed as an adjutant in an unknown unit on 9 Jul 1919, replacing a Lt H J H Wales. He relinquished the temporary rank of Captain on ceasing to be adjutant om 2 Nov 1919 and relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920, retaining the rank of Captain. He returned to Marion, SC, where he went into business and married Meta Sophronia Nichols on 26 April 1922. They had two daughters before Edward died on 12 Jan 1934 in Marion County, SC, USA.
Cpl.
Wheeler   
Harry
99250
C/58
Harry Wheeler was born in about 1884 in Swallowfield, Berks, the son of William and Lucy Wheeler (née Allum). In 1901 he was working as a railway porter in Reading and enlisted into the RFA later that year with service number 16509. He would have signed on for 12 years, though how many he chose to serve “with the colours” and how many in the Reserves is not known. His father had died in 1897 and his mother re-married in about 1904 to become Mrs Lucy Clark. In 1911 Harry was living with his mother and stepfather in Swallowfield where he was working as a domestic gardener. On 12 Jun 1915 in Kingston-upon-Thames he enlisted for a second time into the RFA, and that occasion was 31 years old and was working as an attendant at Horton Asylum, Epsom. He was posted initially to No.4 Depot at Woolwich the next day and then after spells with 4A Reserve Bde at Woolwich, including some time with 24th Reserve Battery, he sailed from the UK to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force on 11 Oct 1915, arriving at Mudros on 25 Oct 1915. He was ostensibly posted to join 54 Bde RFA but that had left Mudros earlier that month to go to Salonika. Harry did not follow them, instead leaving Mudros on 9 Nov 1915 and arriving in Alexandria three days later. On 21 Nov 1915 he was posted to join 58 Bde at Zahrieh. After 58 Bde returned to Egypt from Gallipoli, Harry joined C/58 on 29 Jan 1916. He sailed with the brigade from Alexandria on 25 Jun 1916 arriving in Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916. He was appointed A/Bdr on 20 Oct 1916 and promoted to Bdr on 20 Feb 1917 replacing Bdr Robert Steele (93425). Harry was then appointed A/Cpl on 8 Apr 1917 to replace Cpl Frank Sherman (3479). Harry was still serving in C/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field in June 1917, the award being gazetted on 21 Aug 1917. He was appointed an A/Sgt on 14 Jul 1917, reverting to Cpl on 27 Sep 1917 when he was admitted to hospital with back strain which the XVIII Corps Dressing Station described as “trivial”. He had strained his back while helping drag a gun up a steep incline and his battery commander, Maj E M Hutchinson, confirmed that Harry was “in no way to blame” for his injury. After his recovery he appears to have left 58 Bde when he was posted to join B/317 Bde RFA on 20 Nov 1917 and was re-appointed A/Sgt the same day. Harry was taken ill with influenza and so spent 24 May – 21 Jun 1918 in the Red Cross Hospital in Christchurch, Hants before being transferred to the Military Convalescent Hospital in Wokingham where he stayed until 2 Jul 1918. He was then posted to the Irish Command Depot in Tipperary until 6 Sep 1918 and while there had to go through various physical tests including marching 8 miles without equipment and then doing it twice 3 days apart with full equipment. During his time in Tipperary he showed good improvement in his levels of physical fitness so was sent to 5C Reserve Bde ready for deployment. He was posted back to France on 2 Oct 1918 and three weeks later, on 24 Oct 1918, he joined 381 Battery of 158 Army Bde RFA. After the Armistice he was posted to the UK and sailed from Dunkirk on 30 Jan 1919. He attended the Dispersal Centre at Dover the following day for demobilisation and returned to live with his wife in Vauxhall, London before re-settling in Epsom.
Gnr.
Whetstone  
Charles Walter 
2749
B/58
Charles Walter Whetstone was the fourth son of James and Eliza Maria (sometimes given as Maria Eliza) Whetstone. He was born in 1894 and was baptised on 3 Nov 1894 in St Mary’s church, Ewell, Surrey. In 1911 he was working as a farm labourer at the age of 16 and before he enlisted into the Army he was working for a Mr Horlick of Arbrook Farm, Claygate, Surrey. He enlisted in Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey and joined the RFA. In 1917 he was serving in B/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field but the award was gazetted on 16 Oct 1917, a month after he was killed in action on 23 Sep 1917. One of his brothers was with him at the time and attended his funeral. He is buried in the Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery and Extension, Belgium.
Gnr.
White
Alfred
68148
D/58
Alfred White was born in Artington, near Guildford, Surrey on 8 Aug 1894, the son of Isaac and Annie White (née Choules) and attended the village school. In 1911, 16-year old Alfred was working as a milk boy though apparently enlisted into the RFA in Guildford later that year. Shortly after war was declared he went to France on 23 Aug 1914 as part of the British Expeditionary Force, serving in 37 (Howitzer) Bde RFA. The following March he was evacuated back to the UK due to either wounds or sickness and was then posted in early April 1915 to join the newly-formed 118 (Howitzer) Bde RFA which had gone to France the previous month. He probably transferred into 58 Bde when A/118 Bde became the new D/58 on 15 July 1916. On 18 Nov 1916 he was serving with the guns of D/58 when a premature explosion of an 18 pdr shrapnel shell from a battery sitting behind D/58 went off killing Alfred instantly. Both Capt Carlton Roberts and 2/Lt Richard Blaker wrote to Alfred’s family, with Capt Roberts describing Alfred as “an excellent fellow, always the first to offer himself for any dangerous work that was on hand, and his death is a sorrow to my Battery and to his country….He was killed instantaneously, and he did not suffer for he fell right into my arms.” 2/Lt Blaker said that Alfred “died bravely near his gun”. Alfred’s brother, Louis White, wrote back to Blaker on 26 Nov 1916 thanking him for letting the family know of Alfred’s death. Alfred died aged 22 and is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery, France, alongside Bdr Willie Loader (62538) also of D/58 who had similarly been killed by a premature the previous day.
BQMS
White
J
   
Battery Quartermaster Sergeant J White was serving in 58 Bde at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, when he was instructed to proceed to Suvla on 26 Oct 1915.
Cpl.
White
   
B/58?
Cpl White was probably serving in B/58 in early 1915 when he was twice cited as a witness to offences committed by Gnr Ernest Ballard (10994). The first was on 13 Jan 1915 when Ballard was absent from stables and subsequently found in bed, and again a couple of weeks later when Ballard was absent between 10 p.m. om 1 Feb 1915 and 7.15 a.m. the next day.
A/Bdr.
Whitehouse
John Frederick
10652
A/58
John Frederick Whitehouse, who may have been known as Frederick, was born on 16 Jul 1893 in Edgbaston, Birmingham, the son of John and Louisa Whitehouse (née Hackett). Before the war he worked as a barman for the brewers Mitchells and Butlers. On 31 Aug 1914 he enlisted in Birmingham, aged 21 and was posted initially to No.3 Depot at Hilsea and from there to 184 Battery, which was subsequently renumbered as A/58. He was confined to barracks in Leeds by Maj Crozier for being absent from roll call on 4 Apr 1915. The following month he was appointed A/Bdr in HQ 58 Bde on 25 May 1915. He sailed from Devonport with the brigade on 1 Jul 1915, disembarking at Alexandria on 14 Jul 1915. He sailed from Alexandria on 28 Jul 1915, disembarking at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli. After the withdrawal back to Egypt, he was reprimanded by Lt Jones for being improperly dressed on 27 Jan 1916. He sailed with the brigade from Alexandria on 27 Jun 1916, arriving at Marseilles on 3 Jul 1916. He was awarded a Good Conduct Badge on 5 Aug 1916. He remained serving in HQ 58 Bde for the remainder of the war and was granted leave to the UK on three occasions: between 8 and 17 Feb 1917, on 18 Jan 1918 for 14 days and another 14 days from 21 Nov 1918. He was serving as the orderly to Lt F G Bell, the brigade’s Medical Officer, on 26 Dec 1918 and they were both mounted when his horse slipped and fell on him breaking his foot. He was admiited to 35 Field Ambulance that day who discovered that he had fractured the 4th metatarsus in his left foot. He was evacuated back to the UK on 4 Jan 1919 and admitted to Barry Road Auxiliary Hospital in Northampton. He attended the Northamptonshire War Hospital, Duston, Northampton on 20 Feb 1919 and was discharged from the Army as being sick and wounded on 28 Mar 1919.
Sig.
Whitehouse  
Percy
71794
 
Percy Whitehouse was a pre-war soldier who went to France with the British Expeditionary Force, arriving there on 19 Aug 1914. He was awarded the Military Medal while serving as a Bdr with 8 Bde RFA, the award being gazetted on 9 Dec 1916. He joined 58 Bde in the La Bassée area in the spring of 1917 following a period of convalescence.
2/Lt.
Whitney
n/a
 
2/Lt C Whitney was reported on 27 Sep 1915 as a reinforcement for 58 Bde who was to join them at Suvla Bay from Mudros. This is very likely the New Zealander John Cecil Whitney who was born on 3 Mar 1892 in Remuera, Auckland, the son of Cecil Arthur and Mary Ellen Whitney. He attended King’s College, Auckland where he served in their cadet force for 5 years and then served for 18 months in the NZ Territorial Force’s Auckland Signal Company before being commissioned as a 2/Lt into the NZ Territorial Force’s Garrison Artillery Division on 16 Sep 1912. He worked as an engineer in his father’s company, Colonial Ammunition Company Ltd of Mt Eden, Auckland which was responsible for the manufacture of small arms ammunition for the New Zealand Government. In 1913 he was granted two years’ leave of absence to go to the UK for training. He was due to sail on the SS “Maheno” to Sydney where he was to board the SS “Malwa” for the UK. After war was declared he enlisted in the British section of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) in London on 5 Oct 1914 as a Private with service number E/174 and embarked for Egypt on 12 Dec 1914, arriving there on 23 Dec 1914 where he transferred to the ASC on 28 Dec 1914 and then on 11 Jan 1915 he became a despatch rider in the Otago Mounted Rifles with a new service number 9/174A. He transferred to the RFA in Egypt when he was commissioned as 2/Lt on 4 Jun 1915. As previously mentioned, he probably joined 58 Bde at Suvla Bay in late September or early October 1915 but did not appear to stay with the unit long because he was posted to and joined 59 Bde RFA on 13 Oct 1915. He was still serving with 59 Bde in January 1917 when a cable was sent to London from New Zealand asking that he be recalled to New Zealand for essential war work on munitions. He therefore reported to NZEF HQ in London on 3 Mar 1917 and attended a course at the Royal Arsenal at Woolwich to learn about the manufacture of the Mark VII bullet. He relinquished his commission in the RFA on 26 Jun 1917 on his appointment to the NZ Forces before sailing from Plymouth in June 1917 on the SS “Arawa”, arriving back in New Zealand on 25 Sep 1917 and starting back at work at the Colonial Ammunition Company the following day. He settled back in Auckland, living in Victoria Avenue, Remuera. Since he played no further part in the military he officially resigned his commission from the NZ Garrison Artillery on 4 Jun 1918. On 17 Jul 1918 he married Gladys Torrance Culling in Auckland. Gladys died in 1953. John appears to have re-married because he sailed to the UK for a 7 month business trip and holiday with a Mrs T P Whitney who had been born on 12 Mar 1900. They arrived in London on the SS “Orsova” on 11 Apr 1955. John Whitney died in Auckland on 6 May 1976, aged 84.
Sgt.
Whittaker   
Alfred Norman
77789
A/58
Alfred Norman Whittaker was from Warwick. He was serving as an A/Sgt when he went overseas, arriving in Egypt on about 21 Feb 1915. He was serving as a Sgt in A/58 on 2 Oct 1917 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field.
Bdr.
Whittle    
Arthur
47421
D/58
Arthur Whittle went to France on 15 Apr 1915 and served in 458 Battery in 118 (Howitzer) Bde. He would have transferred into D/58 on 15 Jul 1916. He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery on 22 Dec 1916. He was promoted to Bdr and he and at least 6 other members of the brigade were sent on an advanced telephone course on 22 Jan 1917, probably at XIII Corps school. He was still serving in D/58 when he was killed in action on 26 Sep 1917 and he is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium. His sole legatee was his mother, Mrs Elizabeth Freeman.  In Richard Blaker’s novel about his time in D/58 “Medal Without Bar” there is a signaller called Bdr ‘Jumbo’ Whittle, a chatty and reliable man, and it is likely that Blaker drew his inspiration for the character from Arthur Whittle.  
Sgt.
Wiley
Thomas
67014
D/58
Thomas Wiley was from Guisborough, Yorks. When he enlisted he may have done so alongside a close relative: a Christopher Wiley who also joined the RFA has the service number 67015. Thomas went to France with the RFA on 10 Mar 1915 and it is likely that he served with 458 Battery in 118 (Howitzer) Bde. He was serving in D/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery on 2 Jan 1917. He was wounded later that year, appearing in the War Office’s weekly casualty lists for 2 Oct 1917. He obviously recovered because he was awarded a bar to his Military Medal while serving in B/93 Army Bde RFA, his award being gazetted on 11 Feb 1919. He appears as a character in Richard Blaker’s novel about his time in D/58 “Medal Without Bar” as Sgt Wiley and was recognised by one of Blaker’s readers, also a former member of the battery.
Bdr.
Wilkinson
   
A/58?
Bdr Wilkinson was cited as a witness to Gnr George McGuire (93021) being drunk and of conduct held to be to the prejudice of military discipline at Zahrieh Camp, Alexandria on 20 Jul 1915.
Cpl.
Willcox
Alfred Holton
965451
D/58
Alfred Holton Willcox was born in London on 24 Jul 1895, the son of John and Barbara Willcox. As a boy he sang in the choir of St Anne’s Church, Kew Green and in 1911 he was living with his family in Kew, London and was working as an office boy. He joined the Territorial Force in Woolwich as a Gunner with service number T.895 and served in 8 London Bde RFA. He arrived in France on 16 Mar 1915. At some point he appears to have joined 458 Battery, later known as A/118, and so may have joined 58 Bde when that battery was transferred to become the new D/58 in July 1916. On 3 Oct 1917 he was 22 years old and was serving as a Corporal in D/58 when he and four comrades were killed in action while serving in the Ypres salient. The five of them were originally buried at 28c.4.d.9.3, but he and his four comrades, Gnr William Smyth (14514), Gnr Arthur Himsworth (117053), Gnr Lewis Wakelin (111325), Bdr George Miller (82899), were all re-buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium on 4 Dec 1919. There is a memorial to him in St Anne’s Church, Kew Green, London.
Sgt.
Willday
William
 
 
William Willday was born on 31 Oct 1886 in Leicester, the son of Emma A Willday. When the Census was taken in 1891, William was a patient in the District General Infirmary in Leicester, though the cause why he had been hospitalised was not recorded. In 1901 the 14 year-old William was workinmg in a printing works as a printing machine feeder. He married Hannah Farrar on 1 Aug 1910 and they had a son, William Albert Edward Willday the following year. In 1911 he was working making bicycle tyres in a rubber works. He had been working as an engineer in the Coventry Ordnance Works, Coventry before he enlisted into the RFA on 31 Oct 1914 in Coventry, aged 27 and was posted to No.3 Depot at Hilsea the next day. He must have been promoted swiftly to Sgt because he was at least twice cited as a witness to the offences of men serving in the brigade while holding that rank: he reported the absence of Gnr George Vertigan (10625) of B/58 from Chapeltown Barracks, Leeds between 31 Jan and 2 Feb 1915 and then reported the absence of Gnr Jonathan Kerr’s (81) of A/58 from Milford Camp between 12 noon on 7 Jun 1915 and 11 a.m. the following day. He will have sailed with the brigade from Devonport and so he arrived in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915. Probably while serving at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli he contracted dysentery and was evacuated to Malta where he was admitted to St John’s Hospital. He then left Malta on 23 Dec 1915 to return to the UK on Hospital Ship “Braemar Castle”. Once back in the UK he was treated in Stratford Military Hospital and Birmingham Military Hospital. At some point after he recovered he transferred into the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) and was allocated the new service number 211981. After the Armistice he was serving with 2/1 Siege Artillery Reserve Bde of the RGA in Shoreham-by-Sea where on 10 Jan 1919 he was examined for a potential pension claim due to disability caused by the dysentery, which he claimed required him to have a special diet. His claim was rejected and he was discharged on 13 Feb 1919. He returned to live in Coventry and was still living there with his wife Hannah and their family in 1939 and was working in engineering as a borer and driller. He was also serving as a section leader in the Special Constabulary. William Willday probably died in Coventry on 5 Feb 1952, aged 65.
Gnr.
Williams
David
56164
D/58
William James Davies was the son of David T and Margaret Davies from Senghenydd, Glam. When he enlisted into the RFA in Abertridwr, Glam, he used a false name and so enlisted as David Williams. He was posted to France, arriving there on about 25 Aug 1915. He was serving in D/58 in the Ypres salient when he died of wounds on 19 Aug 1917, aged 23. He is buried in Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No.3, Belgium and he left his effects his siblings David T Davies, John Davies and Elizabeth M Davies.
Gnr.
Williams
Henry William Charles
13968
 
Henry William Charles Williams was born in 1893, the son of Charles Banner Williams and Louisa Margaret Williams. He was born in Cardiff but by 1911 the family were living in Taunton, Somerset where Henry was working as a sanitary engineer. He appears to have been living in Bristol when he enlisted into the RFA on 3 Sep 1914 but he was not posted overseas in 1914 or 1915. He was serving in 58 Bde when he was discharged from the Army due to sickness on 6 Jun 1919. He probably died in Bristol in 1962, aged 69.
2/Lt.
Williams
Hugh Llwyd Harries
n/a
B/58
Hugh Llwyd Harries Williams, known as Llwyd, was born in 1898, the son of William Levi Williams and Martha Philipps Williams (née Harries). In 1915 he passed the London Matriculation. He was educated at Cheltenham College and was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 8 Apr 1917 having attended an Officers’ Cadet Unit. He went to France in September 1917 and was posted to 11 Division Ammunition Column on 19 Sep 1917, from where he was posted to 58 Bde two days later on 21 Sep 1917. Two weeks later he was wounded on 7 Oct 1917 but not severely since he was able to stay at duty. He did though attend the Casualty Clearing Station two days later, presumably to have his wound treated. On 13 Jan 1918 he was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK. On 8 Mar 1918 he was in command of a detachment of B/58 when it came under heavy enemy shellfire. He and his men were shelled with high explosive and gas shells from 7.45 p.m. that evening until 2.30 the following morning at which point they were forced to withdraw. The following month he was wounded again when on 18 Apr 1918 he was in the gun position when an enemy high explosive shell exploded nearby. This time he had to be evacuated and so left 58 Bde, causing the adjutant to comment that he had been “A keen and efficient officer lost to the brigade when he could ill be spared”. He must have recovered because on 9 Aug 1918 it was announced that he was to be employed with the Royal Engineers and he was promoted to Lt on 8 Oct 1918. He relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920 but appears to have joined the Territorial Force as a Captain in the Royal Army Service Corps, serving in the Welsh Divisional Train, though he relinquished his commission on 16 Nov 1920. He married Frances Hilary Hillary in Bathampton, Somerset on 7 May 1924 and they had two sons. Llwyd joined his father’s firm of solicitors in Cardigan, Williams & Williams. Although Llwyd continued to practise a solicitor into the mid-1950s, he and the company were declared bankrupt in 1938 and possibly again in 1944. He died in 1966, aged 68.
A/Capt.
Williams   
Thomas John
n/a
OIC B/58
Thomas John Williams was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA Special Reserve on 11 Sep 1915. He sailed to Egypt, arriving there on about 20 Nov 1915 and was posted to D/60. He was promoted to Lt possibly on 1 Jul 1917, and appointed A/Capt between 11 and 29 Apr 1918 and again from 24 Jun 1918. He was awarded the Military Cross, possibly in the 1918 Birthday Honours. On 13 Sep 1918 he was posted to join 58 Bde and was placed in command of B/58 to cover for Maj A L Cameron who had gone on leave and who returned on 30 Sep 1918. Two weeks after the Armistice Capt Williams went on a sports organisation course on 25 Nov 1918, rejoining the brigade on 9 Dec 1918. He was posted to command A/58 on 25 Feb 1919. He had some leave, returning to the unit on 10 May 1919 and the following day was posted to join the Highland Division which formed part of the force occupying Germany known as the Army of the Rhine. He relinquished his commission on 1 Apr 1920 and was granted the rank of Captain.
Dvr.
Willis
David
151453
D/58
David Willis was born in Wallsend, Northumberland. He enlisted into the RFA in Wallsend and was serving in D/58 on 23 Aug 1918. He was helping get a wagon out of a ditch when an enemy aeroplane swooped and dropped 5 bombs on him and his comrades as they worked to free the wagon. David, along with 8 others, was killed, with one more man later dying of wounds. He left a widow, Florence, and is buried in Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
2/Lt.
Wilson
E H
n/a
D/58
2/Lt E H Wilson joined 58 Bde having transferred from 11 Division Ammunition Column on Christmas Day 1917 and was posted to D/58. He was granted some leave from 10 Mar 1918. Later in the year he attended 1 Corps School, returning to the brigade on 4 Sep 1918. He was granted 14 days’ leave to the UK and so was away when the Armistice took place, being away between 2 and 18 Nov 1918. Soon after his return he was appointed commandant of the La Croisette area on 30 Nov 1918 and made Salvage Officer for the brigade area on 1 Dec 1918. He transferred from D/58 to B/58 on 25 Feb 1919 and a month later left the brigade on 16 Mar 1919 to return to the UK for demobilisation.
2/Lt.
Wilson
 
n/a
 
On 26 Jun 1917, a 2/Lt Wilson left 58 Bde.
Dvr.
Wilson    
Arthur W
42095
B/58
Arthur W Wilson was from Deptford and enlisted into the RFA. He was sent to France, arriving there on about 3 Sep 1915. He was serving as a Driver in B/58 when he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery, the award being gazetted on 23 Jul 1919.
2/Lt.
Windover
Reginald Ernest Thompson
n/a
B/58
Reginald Ernest Thompson Windover was born on 19 Dec 1894, the son of Ernest Lawrence Windover and Leah Windover (née Thompson). He was educated at Highgate School, playing in their cricket 1st XI. He was a student in City and Guilds College, University of London when he sought a commission on 10 Sep 1914 having been a member of the university’s Officers Training Corps for two years. He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 23 Sep 1914 and went to France on Christmas Eve 1914. He was serving there the following year when he was evacuated back to the UK suffering from neurasthenia. He left his unit on 19 May 1915 and sailed from Boulogne on the Hospital Ship “St David” on 22 May 1915, arriving in Dover the same day. A medical board held at 10 Palace Green, Kensington granted him leave to recuperate between 4 Jun and 16 Jul 1915. After that he joined 5C Reserve Bde on 25 Aug 1915. At some point in the following year he joined B/58 because on 6 Jun 1916 he was at el Ferdan, Egypt with the brigade when he punished A/Bdr Richard Semple (93493) for being out of camp. After the brigade went to France, he was acting as the Forward Observation Officer for the battery on 3 Sep 1916 supporting an attack taking place that day. On 28 Sep 1916 he went to hospital sick and was evacuated back to the UK, sailing from Boulogne on the Hospital Ship “St Denis” on 1 Oct 1916, arriving in Dover the same day. A medical board held at 2nd Western General Hospital in Manchester granted him leave to recuperate between 8 Oct and 5 Nov 1916. He returned to 58 Bde when he was posted back to the brigade from the Base Depot on 7 May 1917. He was promoted to Lt on 1 Jul 1917 and went to Paris on leave with Maj T J Hutton between 5 and 10 Aug 1917. Two months later he was wounded when observing from a dug-out on the Poelcappelle Road in St Julien on 12 Oct 1917. A shell hit the dug-out and he was wounded behind his right ear on the back of his head. The dug-out then caved in onto his shoulders and sprained his back. He did not need an operation but was evacuated back to the UK, sailing from Le Havre on 15 Oct 1917 and arriving in Southampton the following day. He was again admitted to 2nd Western General Hospital in Manchester on 17 Oct 1917. A medical board held on 20 Nov 1917 at that hospital believed he would require at least another 3 months to recover from his injuries. In January 1918 he was living back at his family home of Stanley Lodge, 137 Hornsey Lane, London N6. He was assessed as being classed as C(1), which meant that he was deemed able to stand service in garrisons at home so he was instructed to report to the Royal Artillery Command Depot at South Ripon, Yorks on 1 Feb 1918. A medical board held on 12 Jun 1918 at Ripon concluded that he was no longer incapacitated, adding that he was “Tender in upper part of back between the shoulders. No evidence can be found of any injury. His knee jerks are exaggerated. Wound of scalp is healed.” It is not clear if he served overseas again, but after the Armistice he attended No.2 Dispersal Unit at Crystal Palace, London on 31 Jan 1919 and relinquished his commission the following day on completion of service, retaining the rank of Lieutenant. After the war he returned to live in London and joined the family firm of Windovers, a carriage-makers who made bodies for, amongst others, Rolls Royce and Bentley cars. In 1924 he married Ruth Millicent Dove and in 1939 they were living in Hornsey and he was a director of the family company. He was in charge of the company when it had to close in 1956. He and Ruth then appear to have left London and retired to Angmering, Sussex. Reginald died in Worthing Hospital on 6 Oct 1961, aged 66.
2/Lt.
Window 
Alfred McEwen
n/a
A/58
Alfred McEwan Window was born on 4 Feb 1897 into an Army family in Campbellpore, India. By 1911 the family were back in the UK and living in London where his father, Alfred Serapis Window was an NCO in the RFA and his mother Martha Fraser Window was working as a schoolmistress. He joined the RFA and was assigned service number 209073 and then sought a commission. He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA on 10 Nov 1917 and was posted to France, arriving on 20 Dec 1917. From the Base Depot he was posted a week later to join 11 Division Ammunition Column on 27 Dec 1917 and three days later was assigned to A/58. He went on 3 week course for Forward Observation Officers and Signallers at the 11 Division Artillery school on 20 Aug 1918. A few days later on 26 Aug 1918, as the German resistance began to crumble, he formed part of the mobile battery which the brigade created. At 5 p.m. on 6 Nov 1918 he was sent out on a mounted patrol to ascertain and report what was going on and he returned with “most valuable and accurate information” obtained “under great difficulty”. After the Armistice he went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 16 Dec 1918, rejoining from leave on 5 Jan 1919. He was assigned to take over command of the calibration range at Ecaillon on 8 Feb 1919, rejoining on 13 Feb 1919. He was sent to Codners Camp in charge of a group of animals being demobilised on 14 Feb 1919, returning to the unit on 27 Feb 1919. He repeated the journey with a second group of animals on 6 Mar 1919, returning on 17 Mar 1919, before going off on a course to the Indian Royal Artillery Advanced Base Depot in Rouen on 31 Mar 1919. Later that year he joined the Freemasons. When World War 2 was declared he re-enlisted and was awarded the Military Cross in 1943 when he was a temporary Major. He was promoted to Lt.Colonel and appointed the OIC of the new 5 Combined Operations Bombardment Unit in India. In 1961 he married Margrethe Antoinette Bille Brahe Selby. He retired to the Canary Islands and died on 18 Mar 1981 in Queen Victoria Hospital, Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, Spain, aged 84.
Lt. Col.
Winter   
Ormonde de l’Epée
n/a
Bde Cdr
Ormonde de l’Epée Winter was born on 15 Jan 1875 in Chiswick, Middx, the son of William Henry and Fanny Cheney Winter.  He attended Cheltenham College between 1889 and 1892 and was then a career soldier.  He was commissioned into the RFA as a 2/Lt on 17 Nov 1894.  He was promoted to Lt on 17 Nov 1897 and to Capt on 1 Feb 1901 and served in 7th Battery RFA in India that year.  In 1904, he is reported to have struck with an oar a 15-year old boy who had been throwing stones at him while he rowed on the River Ouse.  The boy was killed by a single blow and Winter found guilty of manslaughter.  In 1908 he was serving in Peshawar with 67 Battery RFA and in 1911 in 2nd Ammunition Column RFA.  By 1912 he had been promoted to Major.  He was serving as a Major in 10th Battery, 147 Bde RFA in 29th Division when that division landed at Gallipoli in April 1915 and Winter was Mentioned in Dispatches for the first time in the war on 5 Nov 1915.  He would be mentioned a further four times, on 2 Jan 1917, 18 May 1917, 11 Dec 1917 and on 24 May 1918.  He was promoted to Lt Col in April 1916 which may be when he took over command of 58 Bde.  After the brigade had gone to France, he welcomed Capt T J Hutton warmly to the brigade in late July 1916.  On 1 Aug 1916, C/133 was temporarily attached to 58 Bde and the expanded unit was known as Winter’s Group.  He witnessed the failed British attack astride the River Ancre on 3 Sep 1916 and wrote a coruscating criticism of it, though whether his report was ever sent is not clear.  In mid Sep 1916 while at Leipzig redoubt, Winter was hit on the head by a bit of shell.  On 6 Dec 1916 he spent the first of several periods standing in for the Commander Royal Artillery (CRA) of 11 Division while the latter was away.  He then went on leave on 6 Jan 1917, retuning on 22 Jan 1917.  A few days later he went on a “special mission” with British and French counter-battery groups on 27 Jan 1917.  On 1 Mar 1917 he went to hospital for a few days, returning on 5 Mar 1917, and the following day was appointed commander of the “Left Group” which comprised 59 Bde RFA and 14 Army Horse Artillery Bde.   On 7 May 1917 he was granted 10 days’ leave to go to Paris.  He was awarded the CMG in the King’s Birthday Honours on 5 Jun 1917 and was also awarded a bar to his Distinguished Service Order on 19 Jun 1917 for helping to put out a fire in an ammunition dump on 2 Jun 1917.  He had some leave, rejoining the brigade on 12 Dec 1917.  A few days later, on 15th, he was sent on a week’s course in Amiens on co-operation between the artillery and the Royal Flying Corps, returning to the brigade on 21 Dec 1917.  Two days later he relieved Maj Dane as commander of the Cambrin Group.  The following day however, 24 Dec 1917, he was promoted to Brigadier General and appointed as CRA of 11 Division’s Artillery (11 DA) in place of Brigadier Lamont who had gone for a tour in the UK having been ill periodically for some time, so Winter left 58 Bde on 26 Dec 1917 to take up his new role.  He relinquished command of 11 DA on 13 Oct 1918.  After the war, he was appointed Chief of Intelligence in Ireland during the Irish War of Independence and was head of the so-called Cairo Gang, surviving at least one assassination attempt.  He briefly joined the British fascists and in 1927 he married Marjorie E Pinder and they settled in Kensington.  In 1940, when he was 65, he joined the Finnish Army in their defence against an invasion by the Soviet Union.  Ormonde Winter died in Myrtles Nursing Home, Worthing on 13 Feb 1962, aged 87.  He clearly divided opinion.  After his death, he was described by one of his former battery commanders, Thomas Hutton (by then a Lt General) as “the bravest man I have ever known” and that he “really seemed to enjoy war and yet was one of the most considerate of commanders”.   Not all officers who served under him had such a favourable view: Richard Blaker depicts him as “a hollow little thing” in “Medal Without Bar”.  Winter published his memoirs in 1955 as “Winter’s Tale, An Autobiography”.  There are several articles about him on-line, and he has an entry in Wikipedia.
Lt.
Wood
Percy Neville
n/a
B/58
Percy Neville Wood was born in 1884 in Halifax, Yorks the son of Percy and Beatrice Mary Wood. In 1911 he and his widowed father were living in London where they worked together at a boiler works, the father as a director and London manager and the son as the assistant London manager. After war was declared he enlisted into the “Artist’s Rifles” which was more officially known as the 28th battalion of the London Regiment as a Private with service number 2654 but within a few weeks he applied for a regular commission in the RFA on 21 Dec 1914. He was aged 30 at the time and was commissioned a week later on 28 Dec 1914 as a 2/Lt in the RFA. He went overseas, arriving in Egypt in July 1915. In December 1915 he was promoted to Lt on the 6th and then on the 27th he was serving in C/56 Bde at Cape Helles, Gallipoli when he was struck by a spent bullet. As a result, he was evacuated to Malta and the bullet was removed at Hamrun Hospital on 1 Jan 1916. He was described as “much run down in health”. He joined 58 Bde in 1916, though the precise date is unknown. On 10 Sep 1916 he left B/58 due to “debility through overwork”. He was evacuated back to the UK on the Hospital Ship “Lanfranc” on 13 Sep 1916, sailing from Le Havre and arriving at Southampton the next day. He was sent to the Convalescent Home for Officers at Osborne on the Isle of Wight. He was appointed an A/Captain on 1 Jun 1918. He applied to help the Army Ordnance Department, which is presumably when he transferred to the Royal Army Ordnance Corps and was appointed an A/Major as a result on 12 Jun 1919. On 17 Sep 1919 he married Meryl Broomfield in Holy Innocents church, South Norwood, London. On 23 May 1939 he was a Major in the Reserve of Officers and reached the age when he was no longer liable for recall so was removed from the Reserve of Officers. Later that year he and Meryl were living in Forest House, Uckfield, Sussex and he was working as the managing director of a company making boilers. This appears to have been Sentry Boiler Company, which until 1938 had been called Wood, Russell and Co. He died in Uckfield in 1952, aged 68.
2/Lt.
Woodland
Leonard Milverton
n/a
B/58
Leonard Milverton Woodland was born on 2 Apr 1893. He was commissioned as a 2/Lt in the RFA Special Reserve on 10 Sep 1916. He was serving in 17 (Northern) Division’s artillery when he was posted to join 11 Division Ammunition Column on 8 Oct 1917 and from there was posted to B/58 on 12 Oct 1917. He went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 2 Dec 1917 and went on a course at the Lewis Gun School on 3 Mar 1918 with 4 other ranks. He was promoted to Lt on 10 Mar 1918. He was in hospital and was one of several officers who were sick as of 12 May 1918. He did not return to the brigade so was struck off the strength on 1 Jun 1918 because a medical board had declared him unfit for active duty on 2 May 1918 but was able to stand service on lines of communication (medical category B2). He was appointed A/Capt on 15 Jul 1918. After the Armistice he was appointed A/Major on 25 Jun 1919 while commandant of a Royal Artillery Reception Camp, relinquishing that acting rank on 18 Nov 1919. On 1 Apr 1920 he relinquished his commission and was granted the rank of Captain. In 1939 he was living in Epsom with his wife Ida Catherine Woodland and was working as a company secretary and director of a tailors and outfitters. He was also acting as a part-time ARP warden in Epsom. He died in 1971 in Battle, Sussex, aged 78.
Cpl.
Wooland
 
7625
B/58
While serving at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, Cpl Wooland (7625) reported sick and was probably evacuated. He was replaced by A/Cpl Daniel McLeod (93603). This may be Cpl Horace Edgar Wooland who arrived in Egypt on 14 Jul 1915, though his service number was 9113. Horace Edgar Wooland was killed on 18 Aug 1916 in France aged 22 while serving with 107 Battery, 23 Bde RFA.
Bdr.
Wragg
Harold
20310
C/58
Harold Wragg was born in about 1890 in the parish of Ecclesfield, near Sheffield, Yorks, the son of Tom and Mary Ann Wragg. He was one of eight of their children, but five of his siblings sadly died in childhood. In 1911 he was living with his family in West Brightside, Sheffield where his father was a beerhouse keeper and Harold was working as a storekeeper in an iron foundry. He probably enlisted shortly after war was declared and he joined the RFA. He went overseas to the Balkans, arriving there on about 9 Aug 1915. Two years later Harold was 27 years old and was serving as a Bdr in C/58. On the morning of 29 Sep 1917 he was in his dug out with some of his comrades when a shell struck. He was killed as well as two of his comrades, Gnr John Crockford (94307) and Cpl Ernest Inch (21122). They were all buried the next day by the Chaplain, Rev Cecil G Ruck, and are believed to be buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium. Harold is also commemorated on the lych gate war memorial of St Leonard’s Church, Wortley, near Barnsley, Yorks.
Lt. Col.
Wray   
Henry Cecil
n/a
Bde Cdr
Henry Cecil Wray was born on 11 Dec 1878 in Scarborough, Yorks, the son of Cecil Henry Wray and Edith Catherine Wray (née Pease). In 1881 the family were in Hastings, Sussex and in 1891 they were living in The Hall, Thurlby, Kesteven, Lincs. Henry studied at Haileybury College between 1892 and 1896, and then went to Christ Church College, Oxford where he joined the Freemasons in 1899. He joined the RFA straight from Oxford the following year and was commissioned 26 May 1900 as a 2/Lt. He was promoted to Lt on 31 Mar 1902 and in April 1904 he was serving in 65th Battery and applied to joined the RHA. His application included a report from his battery commander who described him as “fond of outdoor sports, very keen on hunting, and takes every opportunity of riding to hounds.” Although his application was approved, four years later he was again serving in 65th Howitzer Battery in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1908. The following year, Henry married Bessie Phillipson on 31 Oct 1909 in St Nicholas Church, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He was promoted to Capt on 1 Apr 1911 and in February 1914, he was stationed in Jullundur [Jalandhar], Punjab, India and wrote to the War Office agreeing to come under the new Royal Warrant of 31 Aug 1911. He was promoted to Major on 30 Oct 1914 and had been serving with 18th Battery in India when it was sent back to the UK after war was declared in readiness for deployment to France. Maj Wray was left behind in India to give instruction and hand over the battery’s horses to the Territorial unit which was to replace his old battery in India. Having done that he returned to the UK in early 1915 and wrote to the War Office to seek instructions on 4 Feb 1915. He was assigned to 51 Bde RFA, part of the new 9th (Scottish) Division, and went with them to France in May 1915. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the King’s Birthday Honours in June 1917 and was twice mentioned in despatches, on 21 Jan 1916 and on 18 May 1917. He had been serving in 6th Division Artillery when on 27 Dec 1917 he joined 58 Bde to take command of the brigade to replace Lt Col Winter who had just left on promotion. Henry Wray was made an acting Lt Col on 9 Jan 1918 and was also described as the OIC of the “Cambrin Group” when he went on 14 days’ leave to the UK on 6 Jan 1918, returning on 21 Jan 1918. Two days later he reconnoitred the battery positions of 230 Bde RFA ahead of taking over these positions in the St Elie sector of the Béthune salient. He was sent on a Brigade Commanders’ Course at the Overseas School on 15 Feb 1918, returning to the brigade on 4 Mar 1918. On 20 Apr 1918 he went to the 1st Corps Officers’ Rest Station at Aire having been slightly gassed, returning to the unit on 30 Apr 1918. On 19 Jun 1918 he was sent home for 6 months’ tour of duty at home so had a farewell lunch, relinquishing his acting rank the following day so reverted to being a Major. He retired on retired pay on 16 Jun 1921, this having been gazetted the previous day. He retired to live in Winthorpe, Newark, Notts and on 31 Jul 1921 he was appointed as a Major in command of an artillery battery in the Territorial Force: 237 (Howitzer) Battery, part of the 60th (North Midland) Bde, he also became a Justice of the Peace. In 1939 he and Bessie were living in Swinderley Lane, North Kesteven, Lincs along with Henry’s widowed father, Cecil. At that time Henry was retired but was serving in the ARP service while Bessie was in the Women’s Voluntary Service. Henry Wray died in 1957, aged 79.
Sgt.
Wright
Arthur
82835
D/58
Arthur Wright was born in Ticehurst, Sussex. He enlisted into the Army in Woolwich and went to France on 11 Mar 1915. He probably served in 458 (Howitzer) Battery, which became A/118 Bde. He was serving in D/58 near Courcelette in France on 2 Nov 1916 when he and Bdr Harold Paine (14729) were killed by an enemy shell. He is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery, France alongside Harold Paine. Richard Blaker portrays a Sgt Wright in his semi-autobiographical novel, “Medal Without Bar” as a calm, well-organised man who inspired confidence. Another former D/58 member, Ftr John Bailey, recognised Sgt Wright from the book and regretted that a good man such as Dick Wright – as he knew him – had been “knocked out”.
           
S/Smith
Yates
Frederick
90680
A/58
Frederick Yates was born in Shrewsbury, Salop in about 1890. His father was Thomas Yates and his mother was Fanny Yates. Frederick enlisted in Manchester first into the infantry where he served as a Private in the Lancashire Fusiliers with service number 3540 before transferring to the RFA where he was assigned a new service number, 90680. He was serving as a shoeing smith in A/58 when he was killed in action, aged 26, on 27 Oct 1916. He is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery, France. He is commemorated on the Blackley War Memorial in Manchester where his mother was living shortly after the war. It is possible that Frederick was actually the soldier referred to in one set of memoirs who was killed by an enemy 5.9″ shell which hit the emplacement of A/58’s No.4 gun emplacement on 24 Oct 1916, throwing a man 60 yards and whose body was not found for several days.
Dvr.
Young  
Alexander F
84337
A/58
Alexander F Young was from Montrose. He went abroad very likely with 58 Bde to Egypt arriving there on 14 Jul 1915. He was still in the brigade in 1918 and was working as a signaller in A/58 when he was awarded the Médaille Militaire by the French Government on about 30 Apr 1918, the award being gazetted on 17 Aug 1918.
Key:
A/           Acting.  Fulfilling the role and duties of the rank given without having yet been formally promoted.
2/Lt.       Second Lieutenant
Bdr.        Bombardier.  The artillery’s equivalent rank to the infantry’s lance corporal.
BQMS   Battery Quarter Master Sergeant, the second-most senior NCO in the battery.
BSM       Battery Sergeant Major, the most senior NCO in the battery.
Capt.     Captain.
Cpl.        Corporal.
Far.        Farrier.
Ftr.         Fitter.
Lt.           Lieutenant.
Lt. Col.  Lieutenant Colonel.
Maj.       Major.
Sgt.        Sergeant. (For much of the war, the older spelling Serjeant – abbreviated Sjt. – was used.  During the war, the form Sergeant was adopted and this has been used throughout for consistency).
S/Sgt.    Staff Sergeant.
S/S         Shoeing Smith.
T/           Temporary
Whlr.    Wheeler.
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